Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have some functions for which I want to log time consumed in them.

DBResult longTask(DBCommand command)
{
   ...
}

Is there a way to attchieve this

[LogTimeUsed()]
DBResult longTask(DBCommand command)
{
   ...
}

So that I can have class/function somewhere which gets called every time when this function is called and I can inject my own code, get access to command and DBResult and log time spent in function?

THNX

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is no built in way to do this in .NET.

If your wish is not to use any 3rd party libraries (as you said in one of your comments), doing code weaving or dynamic proxy generation is a lot of work. In that case it's better to step away from using attributes and go with the decorator design pattern. Here's an example:

// Define an interface for the operation
public interface IMyLongRunningTask
{
    DBResult longTask(DBCommand command);
}

// Define an implementation for the operation:
public class MyLongRunningTask : IMyLongRunningTask
{
    public DBResult longTask(DBCommand command)
    {
        // code here
    }
}

And now you can write a decorator for the IMyLongRunningTask:

public class MyLongRunningTaskMonitor : IMyLongRunningTask
{
    private readonly IMyLongRunningTask wrappedService;
    private readonly ILogger logger;

    public MyLongRunningTaskMonitor(IMyLongRunningTask wrapped,
        ILogger logger)
    {
        this.wrappedService = wrapped;
        this.logger = logger;
    }

    public DBResult longTask(DBCommand command)
    {
        var watch = Stopwatch.CreateNew();

        var result = this.wrappedService.longTask(command);

        this.logger.Log("longTask executed in " + 
            watch.ElapsedMilliseconds + " ms.");

        return result;
    }
}

When you use dependency injection, you can easily configure an MyLongRunningTaskMonitor to be returned when an IMyLongRunningTask is requested. For instance:

container.Register<IMyLongRunningTask>(() =>
    new MyLongRunningTaskMonitor(
        container.GetInstance<MyLongRunningTask>(),
        container.GetInstance<ILogger>()
    )
);
share|improve this answer
    
what is container.Register and how does it work? –  0xDEAD BEEF Mar 9 '11 at 15:23
    
@0xDEAD BEEF: A container is a term used by dependency injection frameworks. Those frameworks offer ways to compose object hierarchies at the top of your application. The code provided is what you would typically write to wire these dependencies together. All frameworks offer a different syntax to configure the dependencies. The example shown is from the simpleservicelocator.codeplex.com DI framework. –  Steven Mar 9 '11 at 15:33
    
If you're interested in how it works under the covers, read this article: codeproject.com/KB/library/simpleservicelocator.aspx. –  Steven Mar 9 '11 at 15:34
    
Oh. But this approach forces me to use "specific" syntax, when creating class instances. –  0xDEAD BEEF Mar 10 '11 at 12:35
    
Using the Dependency Injection pattern forces you in a specific direction (because that's what patterns do). DI/IoC frameworks each have their own 'language' for configuring this dependency wiring. When you use the DI pattern correctly, you can keep all your code (except the startup code) of your application free of this wiring. –  Steven Mar 10 '11 at 13:20

If you're not handling that particular type of attribute yourself, you should look into Aspect Orientated Programming, using something like PostSharp

share|improve this answer

You could use Castle DynamicProxy.

DynamicProxy generates proxies for your objects that you can use to transparently add or alter behavior to them, provide pre/post processing and many other things.

share|improve this answer
    
How do I do this myself? I don't want to use 3rd party classes/software. How do I create this decorator? Is this thing called proxy? How do I write my own proxy? –  0xDEAD BEEF Mar 9 '11 at 10:18
1  
Why do you want to write it yourself? There's little point in reinventing the wheel. - You can always get the Castle source code and see how they've done it - it's open source. –  Jakub Konecki Mar 9 '11 at 10:52

You can do this using PostSharp

Also check the answer to my question on SO - Aspect Oriented Logging with Unity\T4\anything else

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.