Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using shanselmann's MvcMockHelper class to mock up some HttpContext stuff using Moq but the issue I am having is being able to assign something to my mocked session object in my MVC controller and then being able to read that same value in my unit test for verification purposes.

My question is how do you assign a storage collection to the mocked session object to allow code such as session["UserName"] = "foo" to retain the "foo" value and have it be available in the unit test.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 37 down vote accepted

I started with Scott Hanselman's MVCMockHelper, added a small class and made the modifications shown below to allow the controller to use Session normally and the unit test to verify the values that were set by the controller.

/// <summary>
/// A Class to allow simulation of SessionObject
/// </summary>
public class MockHttpSession : HttpSessionStateBase
{
    Dictionary<string, object> m_SessionStorage = new Dictionary<string, object>();

    public override object this[string name]
    {
        get { return m_SessionStorage[name]; }
        set { m_SessionStorage[name] = value; }
    }
}

//In the MVCMockHelpers I modified the FakeHttpContext() method as shown below
public static HttpContextBase FakeHttpContext()
{
    var context = new Mock<HttpContextBase>();
    var request = new Mock<HttpRequestBase>();
    var response = new Mock<HttpResponseBase>();
    var session = new MockHttpSession();
    var server = new Mock<HttpServerUtilityBase>();

    context.Setup(ctx => ctx.Request).Returns(request.Object);
    context.Setup(ctx => ctx.Response).Returns(response.Object);
    context.Setup(ctx => ctx.Session).Returns(session);
    context.Setup(ctx => ctx.Server).Returns(server.Object);

    return context.Object;
}

//Now in the unit test i can do
AccountController acct = new AccountController();
acct.SetFakeControllerContext();
acct.SetBusinessObject(mockBO.Object);

RedirectResult results = (RedirectResult)acct.LogOn(userName, password, rememberMe, returnUrl);
Assert.AreEqual(returnUrl, results.Url);
Assert.AreEqual(userName, acct.Session["txtUserName"]);
Assert.IsNotNull(acct.Session["SessionGUID"]);

It's not perfect but it works enough for testing.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for this sample, it's been very useful. I've modified your MockHttpSession slightly to return null rather than throw an exception when the key does not exist in the dictionary to more closely mimic the HttpSession object. Just a tip for other consumers. –  DavidWhitney Nov 17 '09 at 11:02
    
Exactly what I needed. +1 –  fre0n Jul 21 '11 at 20:52
    
I've been trying to do this w/o currently being able to reference a mocking framework, and your MockHttpSession is the best example I've found so far. I did discover that changing the getter as such get { return _sessionStorage.ContainsKey(name) ? _sessionStorage[name] : null; } will allow the testing of code which is written as -- if (sessionProperty["some key"] == null){} –  ardave Apr 2 '12 at 18:19

Using Moq 3.0.308.2 here is an example of my account controller setup in my unit test:

    private AccountController GetAccountController ()
    {
      .. setup mocked services..

      var accountController = new AccountController (..mocked services..);

      var controllerContext = new Mock<ControllerContext> ();
      controllerContext.SetupGet(p => p.HttpContext.Session["test"]).Returns("Hello World");
      controllerContext.SetupGet(p => p.HttpContext.User.Identity.Name).Returns(_testEmail);
      controllerContext.SetupGet(p => p.HttpContext.Request.IsAuthenticated).Returns(true);
      controllerContext.SetupGet(p => p.HttpContext.Response.Cookies).Returns(new HttpCookieCollection ());

      controllerContext.Setup (p => p.HttpContext.Request.Form.Get ("ReturnUrl")).Returns ("sample-return-url");
      controllerContext.Setup (p => p.HttpContext.Request.Params.Get ("q")).Returns ("sample-search-term");

      accountController.ControllerContext = controllerContext.Object;

      return accountController;
    }

then within your controller method the following should return "Hello World"

string test = Session["test"].ToString ();
share|improve this answer
    
Great answer! This was just what i needed to unit test data from my session –  Rob Aug 23 '10 at 9:31
    
Worked perfectly. Thank you!! –  Cheese Widget Mar 7 at 17:54

I just found a nice example of how the Oxite team fakes their HttpSessionState and maintains a SessionStateItemCollection collection within that fake. This should work just as well as a moq in my case.

EDIT:

URL for this example is http://oxite.codeplex.com/sourcecontrol/changeset/view/33871?projectName=oxite#388065

share|improve this answer
1  
for the benefit of others finding this question through searches, could you please post a link to the information you found that answers the question. –  Hamish Smith Mar 2 '09 at 23:08
    
+1 to a link for more info on this. –  Pure.Krome May 5 '09 at 2:50
    
I think he is talking about this class: oxite.codeplex.com/sourcecontrol/changeset/view/… –  andrecarlucci Jul 1 '09 at 14:30

I've made a slightly more elaborate Mock than the answer posted by @RonnBlack

public class HttpSessionStateDictionary : HttpSessionStateBase
{
    private readonly Dictionary<string, object> _values = new Dictionary<string, object>();

    public override object this[string name]
    {
        get { return _values.ContainsKey(name) ? _values[name] : null; }
        set { _values[name] = value; }
    }

    public override int CodePage
    {
        get { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
        set { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    }

    public override HttpSessionStateBase Contents
    {
        get { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    }

    public override HttpCookieMode CookieMode
    {
        get { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    }

    public override int Count
    {
        get { return _values.Count; }
    }

    public new IEnumerable<string> Keys
    {
        get { return _values.Keys; }
    }

    public Dictionary<string, object> UnderlyingStore
    {
        get { return _values; }
    }

    public override void Abandon()
    {
        _values.Clear();
    }

    public override void Add(string name, object value)
    {
        _values.Add(name, value);
    }

    public override void Clear()
    {
        _values.Clear();
    }

    public override void CopyTo(Array array, int index)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        return _values.Equals(obj);
    }

    public override IEnumerator GetEnumerator()
    {
        return _values.GetEnumerator();
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return (_values != null ? _values.GetHashCode() : 0);
    }

    public override void Remove(string name)
    {
        _values.Remove(name);
    }

    public override void RemoveAll()
    {
        _values.Clear();
    }

    public override void RemoveAt(int index)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return _values.ToString();
    }

    public bool Equals(HttpSessionStateDictionary other)
    {
        if (ReferenceEquals(null, other)) return false;
        if (ReferenceEquals(this, other)) return true;
        return Equals(other._values, _values);
    }
}

Only thing to watch out for is if you want to access the .Keys property make sure you interact with the type directly as HttpSessionStateDictionary otherwise if you end up calling base.Keys you'll get a NIE.

share|improve this answer

I think you can set an expectation on the mock with a specific value it should return whatever. Mocks are not used as actual fakes but rather things that you can assert behavior on.

It sounds like you are actually looking for an adapter that you can wrap around the session that you can supply a different implementation during tests and during runtime it would return HttpContext Session items?

Does this make sense?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.