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I have a query which calculates the sum/ count of amount (QTY) for a Prefix for a particular Client. A Prefix has been used in place of product to reduce versions/ naming variants.

This query is run on two separate tables that are linked by a foreign key, where client_ID is the shared attribute and primary key in the third table. One table is called Purchased and the other Installed.

I am attempting to calculate what the difference between the quantity installed and quantity purchased is along with a number of additional fields from each table. The concept is similar to a stock check (Amountinstock - AmountSold).

The issue that I’m having is that this creates a cross-join on the result. What are the method(s) to avoid the cross-join? Would outer, right or left joins resolve this or do I need to utilise a union statement.

The tables are as follows:

Client  ( Client_ID*, Client) 
Purchased (Client_ID, Product, Prefix, License Status, Amount, Deployed at, Start_date, End_date) 
Installed (Client_ID, Product, Prefix, Publisher, Version, Domain, Server, Amount) 
*Primary Key 

The quantity of the Prefix & Client query code is:

SELECT 
    Installed.Client_ID, 
    Client.Client, 
    Installed.Prefix, 
    SUM(Installed.Amount) AS QuantityofLicensesInstalled
FROM Installed 
    INNER JOIN Client 
        ON Installed.Client_ID=Client.Client_ID
GROUP BY Installed.Client_ID, Installed.Prefix, Client.Client;

The code attempting to join the results is:

SELECT 
    Installed.Prefix, 
    QuantityofLicensesInstalled, 
    Purchased.Prefix, 
    QuantityofLicensesPurchased, 
    (QuantityofLicensesInstalled-QuantityofLicensesPurchased) AS Differencebetweenvalues
FROM ClientIDPrefixSumInstalled, ClientIDPrefixSumPurchased;

This is currently producing a cross join result.

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if efficiency is your concern, I have often found that 3 simple queries can be better than 1 complex query. Would querying for client, then for purchased and then for install be an option? An other approach I once used was the same except I used UNION as follow SELECT columnA,"" as columnB FROM TableA UNION SELECT "",columnB FROM TableB; this is ofcourse an over simplified example. –  Ali Mar 9 '11 at 10:54
    
Well of course its producing a cross join, thats what you wrote. NEver use implied syntax and you will never have this problem again. Implied joins are a very poor programming technique. –  HLGEM Mar 9 '11 at 15:44
    
Give some sample results so we can better help you with the right query. –  HLGEM Mar 9 '11 at 15:45
    
Sample data of the table and result I have posted on Skydrive at: cid-17aab01efe66331d.office.live.com/browse.aspx/.Public –  Phil Brown Mar 10 '11 at 15:37
    
I have also included Installed.Client_ID and Purchased.Client_ID in the select statement and note that the query needs to match on client/prefix. Should I be using a statement such as WHERE (Installed.Client_ID = Purchased.Client_ID) AND (Installed.Prefix = Purchased.Prefix). Outer join looks like it could remove repeating attributes but I am having issues getting the query to run (Using ACCESS 2007). HLGEM –  Phil Brown Mar 10 '11 at 15:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First: drop the client column from ClientIDPrefixSumPurchased and ClientIDPrefixSumInstalled both from the select clause and the group by.

Then this might result in what you need.

SELECT 
    Installed.Prefix, 
    QuantityofLicensesInstalled, 
    Purchased.Prefix, 
    QuantityofLicensesPurchased, 
    (QuantityofLicensesInstalled-QuantityofLicensesPurchased) AS Differencebetweenvalues
FROM ClientIDPrefixSumInstalled 
full outer join ClientIDPrefixSumPurchased on installed.prefix = purchased.prefix;
share|improve this answer
    
Many Thanks Jens. I couldn't get it to work straight away becauase its appears that MS Access has an issuesupporting the 'full outer join' statement. Tested in MS SQL server and it works. Thanks again. –  Phil Brown Mar 25 '11 at 15:30

Obtain a single list of all the prefixes present in both tables, get the total amount for every prefix in each table, then left join the totals to the prefix list to calculate the difference.

SELECT
  c.Client,
  a.Prefix,
  IFNULL(i.SumAmount, 0) - IFNULL(p.SumAmount, 0) AS AmountDiff

FROM (
  SELECT Client_ID, Prefix
  FROM Installed
  UNION
  SELECT Client_ID, Prefix
  FROM Purchased
) a

  INNER JOIN Client c ON a.Client_ID = c.Client_ID

  LEFT JOIN (
    SELECT Client, Prefix, SUM(Amount) AS SumAmount
    FROM Installed
    GROUP BY Client, Prefix
  ) i
    ON a.Client_ID = i.Client_ID AND a.Prefix = i.Prefix

  LEFT JOIN (
    SELECT Client, Prefix, SUM(Amount) AS SumAmount
    FROM Purchased
    GROUP BY Client, Prefix
  ) p ON a.Client_ID = p.Client_ID AND a.Prefix = p.Prefix
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