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I have such code to read a text file using BufferedReader:

BufferedReader reader=null;
    try {
        reader = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("file1.txt"));

        while (reader.ready()) {
            final String line = reader.readLine();
            System.out.println("<"+line+">");
        } catch (..)
    {
        ...
    }

It works correctly but Findbugs reports a warning:

NP_DEREFERENCE_OF_READLINE_VALUE : The result of invoking readLine() is dereferenced without checking to see if the result is null. If there are no more lines of text to read, readLine() will return null and dereferencing that will generate a null pointer exception.

Then I changed that code in this and tested:

BufferedReader reader=null;
    try {
        reader = new BufferedReader(new StringReader("ABCD"));

        while (reader.ready()) {
            final String line = reader.readLine();
            System.out.println("<"+line+">");
        } catch (..)
    {
        ...
    }

This time the readLine method did return null while ready method always returned true - indeed this is an infinite loop.

This seems that the readLine may return null even if ready returns true. But why the behavior differs from different Readers?

UPDATE:

I do know the normal way to read a text file (just like Peter and Ali illustrated). but I read that piece of code from my colleague and realized that I don't know the ready method. Then I read JavaDoc, but don't understand about "block". Then I did a test and posted this question. So the better way to put this question might be:

When will the input be blocked? How to use ready method (or why not to use it)? Why those 2 Reader (FileReader and StringReader) behave different with ready method?

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I don't see the difference in those code parts... –  LumpN Mar 9 '11 at 11:12
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The ready method tells us if the Stream is ready to be read.

Imagine your stream is reading data from a network socket. In this case, the stream may not have ended, because the socket has not been closed, yet it may not be ready for the next chunk of data, because the other end of the socket has not pushed any more data.

In the above scenario, we cannot read any more data until the remote end pushes it, so we have to wait for the data to become available, or for the socket to be closed. The ready() method tells us when the data is available.

This is my understanding, please correct me if it's wrong.

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your explain sounds easy to understand!+1 –  chance Mar 10 '11 at 15:21
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The Reader.ready() and InputStream.available() rarely work as you might like, and I don't suggest you use them. To read a file you should use

String line;
while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null)
    System.out.println("<"+line+">");
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code hangs forever on that reader.readline() line. Any suggestions? –  Paul Mar 30 '12 at 18:25
1  
That means the other end is is not sending a new line (possible any thing else) –  Peter Lawrey Mar 30 '12 at 21:31
    
nah, that's not it; I did it in openssl on the command line just fine –  Paul Mar 30 '12 at 21:43
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Here's what the Javadocs have to say:

Tells whether this stream is ready to be read. A buffered character stream is ready if the buffer is not empty, or if the underlying character stream is ready.

So a BufferedReader is considered ready simply if the underlying stream is also ready. Since BufferedReader is a wrapper, this underlying stream could be any Reader implementation; hence the semantics of ready() are those declared on the interface:

Returns true if the next read() is guaranteed not to block for input, false otherwise. Note that returning false does not guarantee that the next read will block.

So you only really get timing guarantees, i.e. that read() will not block. The result of calling ready() tells you absolutely nothing about the content you'll get back from a read() call, and so cannot be used to elide a null check.

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4  
Unfortunately for readLine(), ready() only guarentees that one character is available i.e. read() will not block. readLine() will block if there is data but not a complete line. –  Peter Lawrey Mar 9 '11 at 11:15
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Look at the API for ready.

What you're doing is wrong. ready() only tells you if the stream is readable and valid. Read the comment under return on that link as well.

What you want to do is:

String thisLine;

//Loop across the arguments
for (int i=0; i < args.length; i++) {

  //Open the file for reading
  try {
    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(args[i]));
    while ((thisLine = br.readLine()) != null) { // while loop begins here
      System.out.println(thisLine);
    } // end while 
  } // end try
  catch (IOException e) {
    System.err.println("Error: " + e);
  }
} // end for
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