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#include <iostream>
 using namespace std;

struct X
{
    int i_Val;

    X(int iVal)
        :i_Val(iVal)
    {
    }

    X& operator++()
    {
        cout << "X::operator++()" << endl;

        ++i_Val;
        return *this;
    }

    operator int() const
    {
        return i_Val;
    }
};

const X operator+(const X& lhs, const X& rhs)
{
    cout << "operator+(const X&, const X&)" << endl;
    return lhs.i_Val + rhs.i_Val;
}

int main()
{
    X x = 5;
    X y = (++x) + (++x) + (++x);

    cout << y << endl;
}

compile and run. It produces the output:

X::operator++()
X::operator++()
X::operator++()
operator+(const X&, const X&)
operator+(const X&, const X&)
24

But I expected this:

X::operator++()
X::operator++()
operator+(const X&, const X&)
X::operator++()
operator+(const X&, const X&)
22

Who's at blame? Me or the compiler?

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2  
You. This question is asked bidaily it seems :) - See stackoverflow.com/questions/4176328/… –  Erik Mar 9 '11 at 11:54
2  
Our compiler overlords are never wrong. –  Jon Mar 9 '11 at 11:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is not undefined behaviour or a dupe of some i++ = ++i misery, because an overloaded operator is a function call and an implicit sequence point is introduced.

However, it's my understanding that the order of evaluation in this context is unspecified and the compiler is free to re-order this however it likes.

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+1. This is correct. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 9 '11 at 12:05
    
I am always at a loss with the details. How is execution of an expression with an undefined order or evaluation not undefined behavior? For sure the standard does not define a behavior for the execution of that statement. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 9 '11 at 12:22
    
@David Rodriguez: Undefined behaviour produces any result. Executing an expression with undefined order merely produces one of a number of defined results. –  Puppy Mar 9 '11 at 12:24
3  
I just checked the standard (once again and I will forget in a few minutes). To be precise, the order of execution is not undefined but rather unspecified: 1.9/3 Certain other aspects and operations of the abstract machine are described in this International Standard as unspecified (for example, order of evaluation of arguments to a function). –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 9 '11 at 12:27

DeadMG gave the right answer.

If you like to get a 22 you can try a different compiler. ;)

icc gives me your desired output and the gcc produces the 24.

share|improve this answer
    
or different compilation flags, or ... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 9 '11 at 12:29
    
which flag changes the behavior on that? i tried the -O flags but there was no difference. –  tgmath Mar 9 '11 at 12:31
1  
the point is not that any particular compiler flag has to change the output, it's that it is free to do so, just as introducing an extra variable somewhere might tip the register allocation algorithm in the optimiser over some threshold that results in a different order of evaluation, or the next compiler release might just do something different for the hell of it... –  Tony D Mar 9 '11 at 12:36
    
@TonyD: I've never heard a better explanation for the results of unspecified behaviour. Very good. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 3 '12 at 18:53

The produced output is more sound mathematically. Do everything in all parentheses once left to right, then do the parent operation.

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