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In my Python application, I need to write a regular expression that matches a C++ for or while loop that has been terminated with a semi-colon (;). For example, it should match this:

for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++);

... but not this:

for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)

This looks trivial at first glance, until you realise that the text between the opening and closing parenthesis may contain other parenthesis, for example:

for (int i = funcA(); i < funcB(); i++);

I'm using the python.re module. Right now my regular expression looks like this (I've left my comments in so you can understand it easier):

# match any line that begins with a "for" or "while" statement:
^\s*(for|while)\s*
\(  # match the initial opening parenthesis
    # Now make a named group 'balanced' which matches a balanced substring.
    (?P<balanced>
        # A balanced substring is either something that is not a parenthesis:
        [^()]
        | # …or a parenthesised string:
        \( # A parenthesised string begins with an opening parenthesis
            (?P=balanced)* # …followed by a sequence of balanced substrings
        \) # …and ends with a closing parenthesis
    )*  # Look for a sequence of balanced substrings
\)  # Finally, the outer closing parenthesis.
# must end with a semi-colon to match:
\s*;\s*

This works perfectly for all the above cases, but it breaks as soon as you try and make the third part of the for loop contain a function, like so:

for (int i = 0; i < 10; doSomethingTo(i));

I think it breaks because as soon as you put some text between the opening and closing parenthesis, the "balanced" group matches that contained text, and thus the (?P=balanced) part doesn't work any more since it won't match (due to the fact that the text inside the parenthesis is different).

In my Python code I'm using the VERBOSE and MULTILINE flags, and creating the regular expression like so:

REGEX_STR = r"""# match any line that begins with a "for" or "while" statement:
^\s*(for|while)\s*
\(  # match the initial opening parenthesis
    # Now make a named group 'balanced' which matches
    # a balanced substring.
    (?P<balanced>
        # A balanced substring is either something that is not a parenthesis:
        [^()]
        | # …or a parenthesised string:
        \( # A parenthesised string begins with an opening parenthesis
            (?P=balanced)* # …followed by a sequence of balanced substrings
        \) # …and ends with a closing parenthesis
    )*  # Look for a sequence of balanced substrings
\)  # Finally, the outer closing parenthesis.
# must end with a semi-colon to match:
\s*;\s*"""

REGEX_OBJ = re.compile(REGEX_STR, re.MULTILINE| re.VERBOSE)

Can anyone suggest an improvement to this regular expression? It's getting too complicated for me to get my head around.

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Your last regex should actually work, no? –  Frank Feb 7 '09 at 21:43
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9 Answers

up vote 44 down vote accepted

You could write a little, very simple routine that does it, without using a regular expression:

  • Set a position counter pos so that is points to just before the opening bracket after your for or while.
  • Set an open brackets counter openBr to 0.
  • Now keep incrementing pos, reading the characters at the respective positions, and increment openBr when you see an opening bracket, and decrement it when you see a closing bracket. That will increment it once at the beginning, for the first opening bracket in "for (", increment and decrement some more for some brackets in between, and set it back to 0 when your for bracket closes.
  • So, stop when openBr is 0 again.

The stopping positon is your closing bracket of for(...). Now you can check if there is a semicolon following or not.

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Thanks - I guess regular expressions really are the wrong tool for the job! –  Thomi Feb 8 '09 at 8:29
5  
You also need to take into account comments and strings, both of which will throw of this algorithm. –  Loki Astari Feb 8 '09 at 12:31
    
You can remove the comments and strings beforehand with a regular expression. :) Or introduce more variables like openBr, that indicate if you're inside a comment (and what type of comment, so you know what character closes it) or a string. –  Frank Feb 8 '09 at 14:59
15  
Troll line: for (int i = 0; i < 10; doSomethingTo("(")); –  est Apr 25 '11 at 10:13
    
I implemented a similar algorithm to parse functions from C, but i'm running into issues with brackets inside preprocessor directives like #ifdef. Any ideas on how to solve this? –  onetwopunch Aug 13 '13 at 18:19
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This is the kind of thing you really shouldn't do with a regular expression. Just parse the string one character at a time, keeping track of opening/closing parentheses.

If this is all you're looking for, you definitely don't need a full-blown C++ grammar lexer/parser. If you want practice, you can write a little recursive-decent parser, but even that's a bit much for just matching parentheses.

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Actually, with boost:xpressive and possibly python, you can have regexp that perform balanced paren matching. –  Bill Perkins Feb 8 '09 at 1:43
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This is a great example of using the wrong tool for the job. Regular expressions do not handle arbitrarily nested sub-matches very well. What you should do instead is use a real lexer and parser (a grammar for C++ should be easy to find) and look for unexpectedly empty loop bodies.

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+1, Strictly speaking, regex's don't handle nested expressions at all. Regular expressions which handle nested expressions have transcended into context free grammars. –  JaredPar Feb 7 '09 at 20:54
    
I agree with using flex/yacc or similar. But is a C++ grammar really easy to find? Does anyone have a link? I remember the folks from CDT/Eclipse had a hard to actually parsing the C++ input correctly and fast. –  Frank Feb 7 '09 at 21:14
    
Perhaps not; C++ is of course notoriously difficult to parse. Since the original question doesn't require full semantic analysis of the input source, a simpler, incomplete parser could probably do the job just as well. –  Greg Hewgill Feb 7 '09 at 21:20
    
Actually, with boost:xpressive, you can have regexp that perform balanced paren matching. –  Bill Perkins Feb 8 '09 at 1:44
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I wouldn't even pay attention to the contents of the parens.

Just match any line that starts with for and ends with semi-colon:

^\t*for.+;$

Unless you've got for statements split over multiple lines, that will work fine?

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That's probably not sufficient because people do split for() statements over multiple lines. –  Frank Feb 7 '09 at 21:34
    
dehmann is correct - the idea is that the pattern matches examples from a real code-base, so it must be able to handle all valid for loop constructs, including multi-line ones. –  Thomi Feb 8 '09 at 8:30
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Greg is absolutely correct. This kind of parsing cannot be done with regular expressions. I suppose it is possible to build some horrendous monstrosity that would work for many cases, but then you'll just run across something that does.

You really need to use more traditional parsing techniques. For example, its pretty simple to write a recursive decent parser to do what you need.

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I don't know that regex would handle something like that very well. Try something like this

line = line.Trim();
if(line.StartsWith("for") && line.EndsWith(";")){
    //your code here
}
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+1. Of course we're talking Python here so the syntax is trivially different. But if you're not actually parsing the C properly, there's no reason to look for anything other than ‘);’ at the end of a ‘for’ line. –  bobince Feb 8 '09 at 2:00
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Another thought that ignores parentheses and treats the for as a construct holding three semicolon-delimited values:

for\s*\([^;]+;[^;]+;[^;]+\)\s*;

This option works even when split over multiple lines (once MULTILINE enabled), but assumes that for ( ... ; ... ; ... ) is the only valid construct, so wouldn't work with a for ( x in y ) construct, or other deviations.

Also assumes that there are no functions containing semi-colons as arguments, such as:

for ( var i = 0; i < ListLen('a;b;c',';') ; i++ );

Whether this is a likely case depends on what you're actually doing this for.

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Try this regexp

^\s*(for|while)\s*
\(
(?P<balanced>
[^()]*
|
(?P=balanced)
\)
\s*;\s

I removed the wrapping \( \) around (?P=balanced) and moved the * to behind the any not paren sequence. I have had this work with boost xpressive, and rechecked that website (Xpressive) to refresh my memory.

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Not a Python solution (maybe you could write a wrapper...)

First, download lexertl (http:/www.benhanson.net/lexertl.html), then:

#include <algorithm>
#include "lexertl/generator.hpp"
#include <iostream>
#include "lexertl/lookup.hpp"

int main()
{
    lexertl::rules rules_;
    lexertl::state_machine sm_;

    rules_.add_state("FW");
    rules_.add_state("SEMI");
    rules_.add_state("NESTED");

    rules_.add("*", "[/][/].*|[/][*](.|\n)*?[*][/]|[\"](.|\\\")*[\"]",
        rules_.skip(), ".");
    rules_.add("INITIAL", "for\\s*\\([^;]*;[^;]*;|while\\s*\\(",
        rules_.skip(), "FW");
    rules_.add("FW", "\\)", rules_.skip(), "SEMI");
    rules_.add("FW,NESTED", "\\(", ">NESTED");
    rules_.add("NESTED", "\\)", rules_.skip(), "<");
    rules_.add("SEMI", "\\s*;", 1, "INITIAL");
    rules_.add("SEMI", ".|\n", rules_.skip(), "INITIAL");
    lexertl::generator::build (rules_, sm_);

    lexertl::memory_file buff_("main.cpp");
    const char *start_ = buff_.data ();
    const char *end_ = start_ + buff_.size ();
    lexertl::crmatch results_(start_, end_);

    do
    {
        lexertl::lookup(sm_, results_);

        if (results_.id == 1)
        {
            std::cout << "found on line " <<
                std::count(start_, results_.end, '\n') + 1 << '\n';
        }
    } while (results_.id != sm_.eoi());

    return 0;
}
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