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I have a series of Python classes in a file. Some classes reference others.

My code is something like this:

class A():
    pass

class B():
    c = C()

class C():
    pass

Trying to run that, I get NameError: name 'C' is not defined. Fair enough, but is there any way to make it work, or do I have to manually re-order my classes to accommodate? In C++, I can create a class prototype. Does Python have an equivalent?

(I'm actually playing with Django models, but I tried not complicate matters).

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It's called function prototype in Kernighan and Ritchie, where I remember it from. –  Mat Feb 19 '09 at 20:40
    
Just checked, no "class prototypes" in my K&R copy ;) –  Constantin Feb 21 '09 at 23:55
    
Yeah its a bit confusing because the concept of prototypes in OOP and Functional coding are completely unrelated. o_O –  Shayne Dec 11 '12 at 10:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 24 down vote accepted

In Python you don't create a prototype per se, but you do need to understand the difference between "class attributes" and instance-level attributes. In the example you've shown above, you are declaring a class attribute on class B, not an instance-level attribute.

This is what you are looking for:

class B():
    def __init__(self):
        self.c = C()
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1  
I'd be curious for an explanation as to why Python can find the def'n of C when it's assigning an instance attribute but not a class level one. Is it because it's trying to do the assignment at class definition rather than at runtime? –  Dana Feb 7 '09 at 22:31
    
Yes, since the c=C() is in the class definition (executed upon module load), class C does not yet exist. –  truppo Feb 7 '09 at 22:34
1  
@truppo is correct. When you declare class attributes the corresponding references are resolved when the module is loaded (i.e. the class is interpreted). The init method is analogous to constructors in other languages so references in its local scope don't have to resolve until invoked –  Joe Holloway Feb 7 '09 at 22:39
1  
Interesting answer, and I now have better search terms to understand class and instance-level attributes. I'm actually playing with Django models, so am not sure exactly how class versus instance-level attributes will affect that. –  Mat Feb 7 '09 at 22:55
3  
Good recommendations here. The only other thing I would add is that if you're actually running into this issue when trying to define a ForeignKey, you can simply pass the class name as a string and Django will resolve it. –  Carl Meyer Feb 8 '09 at 15:59

Actually, all of the above are great observations about Python, but none of them will solve your problem.

Django needs to introspect stuff.

The right way to do what you want is the following:

class Car(models.Model):
    manufacturer = models.ForeignKey('Manufacturer')
    # ...

class Manufacturer(models.Model):
    # ...

Note the use of the class name as a string rather than the literal class reference. Django offers this alternative to deal with exactly the problem that Python doesn't provide forward declarations.

This question reminds me of the classic support question that you should always ask any customer with an issue: "What are you really trying to do?"

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It was clear from the question what the OP was trying to do, that it was Django-related and that the OP was trying to understand Python's model for object-oriented programming, because Django's ORM can be confusing to beginners. –  Joe Holloway Feb 25 '10 at 6:09
    
That may be true, but what the OP ended up asking was very different from the title of the question. I'm reluctant to change the title three years later, even though it is inaccurate. –  ObscureRobot Nov 23 '11 at 4:47
    
Thanks! This is the exact problem I was getting into. –  Lander Jul 26 at 23:03

This would solve your problem as presented (but I think you are really looking for an instance attribute as jholloway7 responded):

class A:
    pass

class B:
    pass

class C:
    pass

B.c = C()
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1  
In the case of Django models, this is the only answer that works since we're trying to modify the Class itself, not instances of the Class. Django introspects the classes and uses that metadata to drive it's ORM layer. –  verveguy Feb 24 '10 at 22:27
    
I retract my comment - this is fine as a way to add class members to a Python class without needing forward decls. But it does not actually solve the problem for Django model declarations due to something (?) internal to the way Django processes these models. –  verveguy Feb 24 '10 at 23:13

Python doesn't have prototypes or Ruby-style open classes. But if you really need them, you can write a metaclass that overloads new so that it does a lookup in the current namespace to see if the class already exists, and if it does returns the existing type object rather than creating a new one. I did something like this on a ORM I write a while back and it's worked very well.

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All correct answers about class vs instance attributes. However, the reason you have an error is just the order of defining your classes. Of course class C has not yet been defined (as class-level code is executed immediately on import):

class A():
    pass

class C():
    pass

class B():
    c = C()

Will work.

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I know I can do that to fix it (and is what I've done for now) but now my code ordering is non-intuitive. –  Mat Feb 8 '09 at 0:09
    
Well, I see what you mean, but I think it would be more non-intuitive to try to use something that doesn't yet exist. Like doing: print a; a=5 –  Ali Afshar Feb 8 '09 at 0:43
1  
Trying to run some statements such as print a; a=5 clearly doesn't make much sense, but a class is self-contained and perfectly reasonable to forward reference if C-style class prototypes were available. –  Mat Feb 8 '09 at 19:12
1  
Right, well, that sounds like implicit hell. In python things are executed in a straight line, and being "class definition code" makes no difference. What you were trying to do is exactly the same as: print a; a=5 –  Ali Afshar Feb 8 '09 at 21:45

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