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I was going to ask "How to pickle a class that inherits from dict and defines __slots__". Then I realized the utterly mind-wrenching solution in class B below actually works...

import pickle

class A(dict):
    __slots__ = ["porridge"]
    def __init__(self, porridge): self.porridge = porridge

class B(A):
    __slots__ = ["porridge"]
    def __getstate__(self):
        # Returning the very item being pickled in 'self'??
        return self, self.porridge 
    def __setstate__(self, state):
        print "__setstate__(%s) type(%s, %s)" % (state, type(state[0]), 
                                                type(state[1]))
        self.update(state[0])
        self.porridge = state[1]

Here is some output:

>>> saved = pickle.dumps(A(10))
TypeError: a class that defines __slots__ without defining __getstate__ cannot be pickled
>>> b = B('delicious')
>>> b['butter'] = 'yes please'
>>> loaded = pickle.loads(pickle.dumps(b))
__setstate__(({'butter': 'yes please'}, 'delicious')) type(<class '__main__.B'>, <type 'str'>)
>>> b
{'butter': 'yes please'}
>>> b.porridge
'delicious'

So basically, pickle cannot pickle a class that defines __slots__ without also defining __getstate__. Which is a problem if the class inherits from dict - because how do you return the content of the instance without returning self, which is the very instance pickle is already trying to pickle, and can't do so without calling __getstate__. Notice how __setstate__ is actually receiving an instance B as part of the state.

Well, it works... but can someone explain why? Is it a feature or a bug?

share|improve this question
    
Would this allow circular references to be stored? –  James Mar 9 '11 at 14:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Maybe I'm a bit late to the party, but this question didn't get an answer that actually explains what's happening, so here we go.

Here's a quick summary for those who don't want to read this whole post (it got a bit long...):

  1. You don't need to take care of the contained dict instance in __getstate__() -- pickle will do this for you.

  2. If you include self in the state anyway, pickle's cycle detection will prevent an infinite loop.

Writing __getstate__() and __setstate__() methods for custom classes derived from dict

Let's start with the right way to write the __getstate__() and __setstate__() methods of your class. You don't need to take care of pickling the contents of the dict instance contained in B instances -- pickle knows how to deal with dictionaries and will do this for you. So this implementation will be enough:

class B(A):
    __slots__ = ["porridge"]
    def __getstate__(self):
        return self.porridge 
    def __setstate__(self, state):
        self.porridge = state

Example:

>>> a = B("oats")
>>> a[42] = "answer"
>>> b = pickle.loads(pickle.dumps(a))
>>> b
{42: 'answer'}
>>> b.porridge
'oats'

What's happening in your implementation?

Why does your implementation work as well, and what's happening under the hood? That's a bit more involved, but -- once we know that the dictionary gets pickled anyway -- not too hard to figure out. If the pickle module encounters an instance of a user-defined class, it calls the __reduce__() method of this class, which in turn calls __getstate__() (actually, it usually calls the __reduce_ex__() method, but that does not matter here). Let's define B again as you originally did, i.e. using the "recurisve" definition of __getstate__(), and let's see what we get when calling __reduce__() for an instance of B now:

>>> a = B("oats")
>>> a[42] = "answer"
>>> a.__reduce__()
(<function _reconstructor at 0xb7478454>,
 (<class '__main__.B'>, <type 'dict'>, {42: 'answer'}),
 ({42: 'answer'}, 'oats'))

As we can see from the documentation of __reduce__(), the method returns a tuple of 2 to 5 elements. The first element is a function that will be called to reconstruct the instance when unpickling, the second element is the tuple of arguments that will be passed to this function, and the third element is the return value of __getstate__(). We can already see that the dictionary information is included twice. The function _reconstructor() is an internal function of the copy_reg module that reconstructs the base class before __setstate__() is called when unpickling. (Have a look at the source code of this function if you like -- it's short!)

Now the pickler needs to pickle the return value of a.__reduce__(). It basically pickles the three elements of this tuple one after the other. The second element is a tuple again, and its items are also pickled one after the other. The third item of this inner tuple (i.e. a.__reduce__()[1][2]) is of type dict and is pickled using the internal pickler for dictionaries. The third element of the outer tuple (i.e. a.__reduce__()[2]) is also a tuple again, consisting of the B instance itself and a string. When pickling the B instance, the cycle detection of the pickle module kicks in: pickle realises this exact instance has already been dealt with, and only stores a reference to its id() instead of really pickling it -- this is why no infinte loop occurs.

When unpickling this mess again, the unpickler first reads the reconstruction function and its arguments from the stream. The function is called, resulting in an B instance with the dictionary part already initialised. Next, the unpickler reads the state. It encounters a tuple consisting of a reference to an already unpickled object -- namely our instance of B -- and a string, "oats". This tuple now is passed to B.__setstate__(). The first element of state and self are the same object now, as can be seen by adding the line

print self is state[0]

to your __setstate__() implementation (it prints True!). The line

self.update(state[0])

consequently simply updates the instance with itself.

share|improve this answer

Here's the thinking as I understand it. If your class uses __slots__, it's a way to gaurantee that there aren't any unexpected attributes. Unlike a regular Python object, one that's implemented with slots cannot have attributes dynamically added to it.

When Python unserializes an object with __slots__, it doesn't want to just make an assumption that whatever attributes were in the serialized version are compatible with your runtime class. So it punts that off to you, and you can implement __getstate__ and __setstate__.

But the way you implemented your __getstate__ and__setstate__, you appear to be circumventing that check. Here's the code that's raising that exception:

try:
    getstate = self.__getstate__
except AttributeError:
    if getattr(self, "__slots__", None):
        raise TypeError("a class that defines __slots__ without "
                        "defining __getstate__ cannot be pickled")
    try:
        dict = self.__dict__
    except AttributeError:
        dict = None
else:
    dict = getstate()

In a round about way, you're telling the Pickle module to set its objections aside and serialize and unserialize your objects as normal.

That may or may not be a good idea -- I'm not sure. But I think that could come back to bite you if, for example, you change your class definition and then unserialize an object with a different set of attributes than what your runtime class expects.

That's why, when using slots especially, your __getstate__ and __getstate__ should be more explicit. I would be explicit and be clear that you're just sending the dictionary key/values back and forth, like this:

class B(A):
    __slots__ = ["porridge"]
    def __getstate__(self):
        return dict(self), self.porridge 
    def __setstate__(self, state):
        self.update(state[0])
        self.porridge = state[1]

Notice the dict(self) -- that casts your object to a dict, which should make sure that the first element in your state tuple is only your dictionary data.

share|improve this answer
    
dict(self) does not cast the object to a dict. It copies it. And there is a tremendous difference when it comes to performance. Other than that, I certainly found your answer informative. But it is a bit indecisive. I don't really need the answer as this was just an experiment, but I'd like to know what really goes on here. Maybe I'll bounty it later. –  porgarmingduod Mar 10 '11 at 2:01
    
Yes, it will create a copy of the hash, and if your dictionary is big or you do this often, it will cost you. I'm a little indecisive because it isn't really clear what you're doing the wrong thing per se... You might ask on the Python mailing list. –  Ken Mar 10 '11 at 21:18

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