Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using the jQuery animate method in which I want to call a function when the animation is complete. Since the function is called several times in a loop, I need to access some variable but do not know how to do this (something to do with closures I guess).

I have :

while (i<numberofTimeIntervals)
{   
     // some calculations here
     xPos = initialPosX + x + "px";
     yPos = initialPosY - y + "px";

     $("#object").animate({left: xPos},10).animate({top: yPos},10, function(){ console.log(xPos) });  <-- what I want here is the access to xPos and yPos

     i = i + 1;
}

So I need to have access to xPos and yPos at the time it is calculated as the callback is called at a later time.

JD.

share|improve this question
    
You should have the variable there. It's in the closure's scope... what's it doing? –  Groovetrain Mar 9 '11 at 14:41
    

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use a second closure:

while(i<numberofTimeIntervals)
{
    var xPos = initialPosX + x + "px";
    var yPos = initialPosY - y + "px";

    (function(xPos) {
        $('#object').animate({left: xPos},10).animate({top: yPos},10, function(){  console.log(xPos) });
    })(xPos);

    i++;
}

Explanation: JavaScript has no block scope, just a function scope. So your callback function's closure saves the variable (not its value) xPos. So at the end of the loop, the saved variable - which is the same one as the loop variable - has the final value. By wrapping the call in an anonymous function which gets the variable passed as an argument, it's now saved as a new variable which will not be modified anymore.


Btw, if you had access to JavaScript 1.7 (unfortunately only few browsers support it) you could also use let xPos instead of var xPos to move it into the block scope.

share|improve this answer
    
Whoever downvoted: Please leave a comment. From what I know this is the correct way to deal with closures inside of loops. –  ThiefMaster Mar 9 '11 at 14:47
    
Thank you so much, this worked, how and why? –  JD. Mar 9 '11 at 14:59
    
JavaScript has no block scope, just a function scope. So your callback function's closure saves the variable (not its value) xPos. So at the end of the loop, the saved variable - which is the same one as the loop variable - has the final value. By wrapping the call in an anonymous function which gets the variable passed as an argument, it's now saved as a new variable which will not be modified anymore. –  ThiefMaster Mar 9 '11 at 15:04
    
mennovanslooten.nl/blog/post/62 explains it more detailed –  ThiefMaster Mar 9 '11 at 15:05
1  
You can't really attribute the lack of let support to IE - no versions support it including IE 9 - let is a Mozilla extension to the ECMAScript specification which JavaScript is based upon. FWIW, Chrome and plenty other browsers don't support it either, useful as it may be. –  Andy E Mar 9 '11 at 15:22

You can define them as global variables, meaning outside of any function or object. Then you can access them from anywhere.

share|improve this answer

You have a closure there. You should have access to both these variable already. Can you post the exact code pleas?

share|improve this answer
    
No, he will always have the last xPos value as the closure. See mennovanslooten.nl/blog/post/62 –  ThiefMaster Mar 9 '11 at 14:46
    
Yep, that is what is happening. –  JD. Mar 9 '11 at 14:53
    
Ahh my bad. Sorry. –  Nikhil Mar 9 '11 at 15:30

try this:

while (i<numberofTimeIntervals) {   

   //<!-- some calculations here--->

   (function(){
       var 
          xPos = initialPosX + x + "px",
          yPos = initialPosY - y + "px";

       $("#object")
          .animate({left: xPos},10)
          .animate({top: yPos},10, function(){  console.log(xPos) });  
       //<-- what I want here is the access to xPos and yPos

   })();

   i = i + 1;
}
share|improve this answer

I got it to work this way: http://jsfiddle.net/gailbear/WbNdx/6/

function printme(xpos){
    console.log(xpos);
}

while (i < numberofTimeIntervals) {

    var xPos = initialPosX + x + "px";
    var yPos = initialPosY - y + "px";

    $("#object").animate({
        left: xPos
    }, 10).animate({
        top: yPos
    }, 10, printme(xPos));

    i = i + 1;
}

The first error I got was "don't define functions within a loop". Let me know if that code helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry to say, but that's completely wrong. You pass the (undefined) return value of a new function instead of a function as the callback. So you execute the function immediately instead of when the callback should be called. –  ThiefMaster Mar 9 '11 at 15:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.