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I want to create a list of names and access it as a strongly typed enum. For eg.

string foo = FileName.Hello; //Returns "Hello.txt"
string foo1 = FileName.Bye; //Returns "GoodBye.doc"

Or it could be an object like:

Person p = PeopleList.Bill; //p.FirstName = "Bill", p.LastName = "Jobs"

How do I create a datatype like this?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Although the question is strange or not completely explained, here is the literal solution:

Option 1:

public static class FileName
{
    public const string Hello = "Hello.txt";
    public const string GoodBye= "GoodBye.doc";
}

Option 2:

public class Person
{
    public string FirstName {get; set; }
    public string LastName {get; set; }

    public Person(string firstName, string lastName)
    {
        this.FirstName = firstName;
        this.LastName = lastName;
    }
}

public static class PeopleList
{
    public static Person Bill = new Person("Bill", "Jobs");
}
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lol, I was over-complicating things with a dictionary. –  Shawn Mclean Mar 9 '11 at 19:33
    
FYI this still feels "strange" (perhaps because I don't know what you're actually doing). I assume it is just a test app or school work but hard coding things like this is not "normal." –  Josh M. Mar 9 '11 at 19:36
    
I basically using a template system and rather than pass a string for the file name, I store the file name else where and access it with a strongly types property. –  Shawn Mclean Mar 9 '11 at 19:41

just use a Dictionary<People, Person> for that:

 enum People { Bill, Bob};

 var myDict = new Dictionary<People, Person>();

 myDict.Add(People.Bill, new Person() { FirstName = "Bill", LastName = "Jobs" });

now you can get Bill back with this syntax:

Person p = myDict[People.Bill];
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You can you Extension Methods on your Enum object to return specific values.

Have a look at:

http://pietschsoft.com/post/2008/07/C-Enhance-Enums-using-Extension-Methods.aspx

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1  
This answer looks pretty fine... the proper way to associate metadata information with an Enum in .Net. Quote: “So, what can't you take? Decide which of the two options is harder, and do the other. That way, no matter how hard your choice turns out to be, at least you can find comfort in knowing you're avoiding something even worse.” ― Josephine Angelini –  Faisal Mq Jan 7 at 12:24
    
@FaisalMq Agreed. And that's an awesome quote. –  Brandon Moretz Jan 7 at 12:54

Here's an article on CodeProject that will show you how to create an attribute that you can apply to each enumeration member to give it some "extra" data (like your filename, in this case) that you can use elsewhere in code.

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You can use static class with values..

public static class PeopleList
{
   public static readonly Person Bill = new Person("Bill", "Jobs");
   public static readonly Person Joe = new Person("Joe", "Doe");
}

public static class FileNames
{
   public static readonly string Hello = "Hello.txt";
   public static readonly string Bye = "Byte.txt";
}

then you can reference them as PeopleList.Bill or FileNames.Hello. It won't have the same properties as an enum and your methods will need to take a string or Person as parameter.

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This is an over the top solution using attributes for your second example. Note this code has a lot of problems and is just an example.

public static T GetValue<T>(this Enum e) where T:class
{
    FieldInfo fi = e.GetType().GetField(e.ToString());
    var valueAttribute = fi.GetCustomAttributes(typeof (ValueAttribute), 
        false).FirstOrDefault() as ValueAttribute;
    if (valueAttribute != null) return valueAttribute.Value as T;
    return null;
}

class PersonValueAttribute : ValueAttribute
{
    public PersonValueAttribute(string firstName, string lastName)
    {
        base.Value = new Person {FirstName = firstName, LastName = lastName};
    }
}

class Person
{
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }

    public static implicit operator Person(Enum e)
    {
        return e.GetValue<Person>();
    }
}

enum PeopleList
{
    [PersonValue("Steve", "Jobs")]
    Steve
}

Allowing for simple usage:

Person steve = PeopleList.Steve;
Console.WriteLine(steve.FirstName); //Steve
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I would use the Description attribute to attach custom data to an enum. Then you can use this method to return the value of the description:

    public static string GetEnumDescription(Enum value)
    {
         FieldInfo fi = value.GetType().GetField(value.ToString());
         DescriptionAttribute[] attributes = (DescriptionAttribute[])fi.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DescriptionAttribute), false);
         string description = (attributes.Length > 0) ? attributes[0].Description : string.Empty;
         return description;
    }
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