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I am wondering what the best way to store a .pdf would be. Is it okay to store them as blobs in SQL or is it better to store them on a data disk and store the path in the table?

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What size are the PDFs? What RDBMS are you using? SQL Server 2008 has Filestream for example which stores them outside the database file but in an integrated manner (but still the recommendation as to whether to use this or blobs depends on file size) –  Martin Smith Mar 9 '11 at 19:31
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This question has been asked many time. search for "store files in database vs filesystem" –  Shawn Mclean Mar 9 '11 at 19:32
    
See e.g. my answer to this: stackoverflow.com/questions/2467774/working-with-images-in-wcf - Microsoft Research has a great whitepaper To Blob or not to Blob which answers this question in greate detail –  marc_s Mar 9 '11 at 19:45
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There isn't one right answer here but one consideration is if volume of data will be a problem. If it's not too large I prefer to keep them in the database for the same reason I like to have a database with backups, consistency and recoverability of my data. If you use file system, or even filestream you do not back up your pdf when you backup your database, and if you restore to another server or rollback to a previous point in time you may end up with your pdfs and your data in inconsistent states. Sure it will perform better and you should definitely keep that in mind but if performance isn't an issue it sure is nice to be able to restore a database to another server, even in development or test and know that you have all of your data, not all of your data EXCEPT your pdfs.

UPDATE: Martin is correct, filestream data is backed up with your regular backups and you can use the WITH MOVE option when restoring to restore the data to a different location if needed. So to clarify, if you use plain old pointers to files on disk somewhere you will not have your pdfs backed up when you backup your database but you will if you use filestream. You still need to be careful that the files are not modified outside of the database since the database will no longer ensure integrity of your records, for example a user could delete the file off of the filesystem that the filestream is pointing too, or antivirus could quarantine the file if it was configured incorrectly. With a little planning filestream looks like a great option for many scenarios.

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If you plan that your DB will very big, then better to store. pdf files on a data disk (and in DB only path) due to performance issues. But if your DB will not very big - saving .pdf files in DB is ok.

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Okay I doubt this DB even with pdf storage would ever exceed 30gb. I think I will store them as blobs then. Thank you! –  korrowan Mar 9 '11 at 19:41
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If you store just the path in the DB, make sure that you think about archiving. Will the PDFs live forever on the disk? What happens if you run out of space? How will the database be updated in these cases?

Not an argument against storing on disk, just some things to keep in mind.

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If you store them in the database your performance will decrease and you will not be able to use 3rd party tools to view the data.

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If the file size is less then 1Mb and/or the file is rarely edited you should store the file in SQL server, because of the performance. If the file will be edited a lot and/or is greater then 1Mb you should store your file into the file system.

See this question for more information: Save documents as BLOB in SQL or on file system

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