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Suppose I have a response variable and a data containing three covariates (as a toy example):

y = c(1,4,6)
d = data.frame(x1 = c(4,-1,3), x2 = c(3,9,8), x3 = c(4,-4,-2))

I want to fit a linear regression to the data:

fit = lm(y ~ d$x1 + d$x2 + d$y2)

Is there a way to write the formula, so that I don't have to write out each individual covariate? For example, something like

fit = lm(y ~ d)

(I want each variable in the data frame to be a covariate.) I'm asking because I actually have 50 variables in my data frame, so I want to avoid writing out x1 + x2 + x3 + etc.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 50 down vote accepted

There is a special identifier that one can use in a formula to mean all the variables, it is the . identifier.

y <- c(1,4,6)
d <- data.frame(y = y, x1 = c(4,-1,3), x2 = c(3,9,8), x3 = c(4,-4,-2))
mod <- lm(y ~ ., data = d)

You can also do things like this, to use all variables bar one:

mod <- lm(y ~ . - x3, data = d)

Technically, . means all variables not already mentioned in the formula. For example

lm(y ~ x1 * x2 + ., data = d)

where . would only reference x3 as x1 and x2 are already in the formula.

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The data frame 'd' has 4 columns (y, x1, x2, and x3). So if the formula is "y ~ .", does the right hand side mean "all the columns" except those listed on the left hand side? –  stackoverflowuser2010 Feb 3 '14 at 4:17
    
@stackoverflowuser2010 Yes, . technically means all variables in data not already in the formula. –  Gavin Simpson Feb 3 '14 at 14:50

A slightly different approach is to create your formula from a string. In the formula help page you will find the following example :

## Create a formula for a model with a large number of variables:
xnam <- paste("x", 1:25, sep="")
fmla <- as.formula(paste("y ~ ", paste(xnam, collapse= "+")))

Then if you look at the generated formula, you will get :

R> fmla
y ~ x1 + x2 + x3 + x4 + x5 + x6 + x7 + x8 + x9 + x10 + x11 + 
    x12 + x13 + x14 + x15 + x16 + x17 + x18 + x19 + x20 + x21 + 
    x22 + x23 + x24 + x25
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1  
This works very well for reading these values from a file. Thanks! –  Ben Sidhom Apr 2 '14 at 22:38

Yes of course, just add the response y as first column in the dataframe and call lm() on it:

d2<-data.frame(y,d)
> d2
  y x1 x2 x3
1 1  4  3  4
2 4 -1  9 -4
3 6  3  8 -2
> lm(d2)

Call:
lm(formula = d2)

Coefficients:
(Intercept)           x1           x2           x3  
    -5.6316       0.7895       1.1579           NA  

Also, my information about R points out that assignment with <- is recommended over =.

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Thanks! Yeah, I know everyone always says to use <-, but nobody ever says why and = is easier to type =). –  grautur Mar 9 '11 at 22:40
1  
@gratur One reason is that things like foo(bar <- 1:10) work (and bar is created) but foo(bar = 1:10) would either fail because bar is not an argument of foo and won't create bar either. –  Gavin Simpson Mar 25 '13 at 16:02
1  
Why is the coefficient of x3 NA? –  ziyuang Apr 14 '13 at 5:41

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