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I have a table that has Time1 and Time2 (for the sake of example). Time2 allows for nulls.

I have an object model and I want to have Time2 as nullable; so far I have this:

public Class MyModel{
   public DateTime Time1 {get;set;}
   public System.Nullable<DateTime> Time2 {get;set}
}

When I go to my query, I have this:

var MyQuery = ...
   select new MyModel()
   { 
      Time2 = (a.Time2)

and here I'm wondering if I should have the SingleOrDefault operator? It's not showing in the intellisense. Howver, the intellisense is showing several other options, amongst whic are: HasValue, Value, GetValueOrDefault.

Any ideas on what's the right one to choose from?

Thanks

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1  
You can use DateTime? instead of System.Nullable<DateTime>. –  Mike Cole Mar 9 '11 at 20:51
    
Are you sure you've included System.Linq? If so, please post your entire query. –  Mike Cole Mar 9 '11 at 20:51
    
You can use DateTime? instead of the System.Nullable<DateTime>. It is ok as you are writing it, if a.Time2 is a DateTime or a DateTime?. –  xanatos Mar 9 '11 at 20:52
    
Do I just replace public System.Nullable<DateTime> with DateTime? in my object model definition? –  frenchie Mar 9 '11 at 20:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

That's because Time2 is a nullable type. Nullable types always have a value property. If you revise your line to:

Time2 = (a.Time2).Value

and then press the period symbol after Value, you'll see the Intellisense pop up.

As a safety check you may want to also check that the value of a.Time2 is not null, before using .Value. Otherwise you'll get a null reference exception

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Well sometimes Time2 will be null. How should I write this line? I changed the type to DateTime?; is this good? –  frenchie Mar 9 '11 at 20:57
    
DateTime? is equivalent to Nullable<DateTime>. –  Shan Plourde Mar 9 '11 at 21:05
    
Mike C's suggestion is a good way to write the line. –  Shan Plourde Mar 9 '11 at 21:06
    
Yes but I get a "no explicit conversion between System.DateTime and <null>" right after the question mark with Time2 defined either as System.Nullable<DateTime> or as DateTime? –  frenchie Mar 9 '11 at 21:08
    
cast the null like this: (DateTime?)null –  Shan Plourde Mar 9 '11 at 21:22
Time2 = a.Time2.HasValue ? a.Time.Value : null;
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OK, and for the object model, should I keep it defined as System.Nullable<DateTime> or DateTime? –  frenchie Mar 9 '11 at 21:02
1  
I get a "no explicit conversion between System.DateTime and <null>" right after the question mark with Time2 defined either as System.Nullable<DateTime> or as DateTime? –  frenchie Mar 9 '11 at 21:08
    
cast the null like this: (DateTime?)null –  Shan Plourde Mar 9 '11 at 21:23
    
I use the DateTime? form everywhere. It's easier to read and it doesn't have angle braces to hurt my eyes. –  Mike Cole Mar 9 '11 at 21:57

Why do you think that You should have a method that exists for items of a collection on something that is a System.Nullable<DateTime>.

You won't have SingleOrDefault() on this.

Time2 = (a.Time2.HasValue ? a.Time2.Value : null)

That's how you should set the value or have it be null.

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So what do I do? Do I choose GetSingleOrDefault? –  frenchie Mar 9 '11 at 20:55
    
@frenchie nothing, it will either be the Value or null. You may need to call the Value on the a.Time2().Value –  msarchet Mar 9 '11 at 20:57
    
Ok so I just write Time2 = a.Time2.Value? Will it throw an exception when it's null? –  frenchie Mar 9 '11 at 20:58
    
@frenchie see the edit. –  msarchet Mar 9 '11 at 21:00
    
I get a "no explicit conversion between System.DateTime and <null>" right after the question mark with Time2 defined either as System.Nullable<DateTime> or as DateTime? –  frenchie Mar 9 '11 at 21:07

SingleOrDefault is a extension method for the generic IEnumerable as you see below.

public static TSource SingleOrDefault( this IEnumerable source)

If you had some list of Nullable you could use that method and it would return the first value or throws if the list had none or more than one item.

//a list of Nullable<DateTime> with exactly 1 item
var listOfDates = new DateTime?[] { null };

var myDate = listOfDates.SingleOrDefault(); // myDate => ((DateTime?)null)

That is probably not what you want, you want some value when it is null, then you should use either the coalesce operator of C# 3.0 or one of the overloads of the GetValueOrDefault method from Nullable<> type.

DateTime? myNullDate = null;

DateTime myDate;
myDate = myNullDate ?? DateTime.Now; // myDate => DateTime.Now
myDate = myNullDate ?? default(DateTime); // myDate => DateTime.MinValue
myDate = myNullDate.GetValueOrDefault(DateTime.Now); // myDate => DateTime.Now
myDate = myNullDate.GetValueOrDefault(); // myDate => DateTime.MinValue
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