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I have 3 models: Customers, Stores, Signups (a mailing list)

(Signups are their own object since they have state like opted in, opted out, blacklisted, etc)

Customers and Stores are fairly independent and currently have no direct association to each other.

However, we're adding a 'mailing list' construct, Signups:

Signup belongs_to :store AND :customer
Store has_many :signups 
Customer has_many :signups

It's not clear to me under what conditions I would need to include:

store has_many :customers, :through => :signups
customer has_many :stores, :through => :signups

Without the :through when a store X sends a broadcast email to it's mailing list, we'd simply let mail_list = customers.signup.find( where store_id matches X)

Question 1: Is there any problem with that approach?

Question 2: if we DID add the :through, what would the query looks like to get all the customers who have a 'signup' for the current store?

Question 3: if we had 3 or 3 different joint tables between customers and stores (for example orders, invoices, signups, discountclubs) does that present any problem?

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1 Answer 1

Question 1: Is there any problem with that approach?

The example you've given wouldn't work (the non :through approach) because if customers have many signups, customer.signup will only be available on a customer instance, not a collection. If you were to not use join tables, you'd have to either iterate over a lot of data to collect everything, or write some sql to deal with it, which means you're pretty much using a join table anyway, but inefficiently.

Question 2: if we DID add the :through, what would the query looks like to get all the customers who have a 'signup' for the current store?

store.customers would generate something along these lines:

SELECT `customers`.* FROM `customers` INNER JOIN `signups` ON `customers`.id = `signups`.customer_id WHERE ((`signups`.store_id = 1))

Question 3: if we had 3 or 3 different joint tables between customers and stores (for example orders, invoices, signups, discountclubs) does that present any problem?

No, it shouldn't be a problem. It's the right day to deal with those kind of relationships (well, maybe not orders and invoices unless they're common to multiple customers or something). Just make sure you put indexes on the right columns.

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You mentioned using store.customers as the way to find the customers for the store, but if you have multiple join tables (orders, signups, discountcards) isn't it ambiguous WHICH join table you're going through? in other words if there are 3 possible join tables how do we specify WHICH 'join' we want to use ot find the customers who are on the mailing list (vs in the discountclub)? –  jpwynn Mar 9 '11 at 23:04
    
Well, that would depend on how you name your associations. :) If signups represents people who're subscribed to a mailing list, then perhaps 'customers' isn't the correct name for them. Subscribers maybe. Discount club members could be called 'discount_club_members'. It might make more sense for store.customers to use the store to order relationship rather than mailing list subscribers. Then there's less ambiguity. Depends on what you call a customer, I guess. That's just semantics though. Not so much to do with the use of :through or not... –  idlefingers Mar 9 '11 at 23:14
    
well we have stores and customers and they do in fact intersect in 3 different ways. some customers ar eon the mailing list. some have discount cards. and some have invoices. for each of those three types of intersections, there is a join table. can we no say stores.JOINTABLENAME.customers to specify WHICH list of customers we want? we're –  jpwynn Mar 10 '11 at 0:19
    
I think you're missing my point of how they could be named differently to make it more obvious what they are, but if you prefer to do it the other way, then go for it. Do what works best for you - the best way to learn is to try. You'll probably quite quickly see the pitfalls of trying to do it that way, but because of how easy Rails makes it to refactor these kind of things, you'll easily be able to change the association names later. –  idlefingers Mar 10 '11 at 10:06

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