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Having a look around, am I correct in thinking that the only type of background services are audio, voip and location services and so that if I wanted to communicate with a server I have to use push notifications. This means that badges are only uses for push notifications.

Update: I want to check for updates on the server every 5 minutes or so. So the device is checking the server, not the server pushing to the device. I suppose email is an example. It polls the server.

Thanks Simon

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What are you trying to achieve? Also, re push notifications, think of them as "server communicating with device" rather than "device communicating with server"... push notifications can also have messages, sounds, and custom user data. –  wpearse Mar 9 '11 at 21:55
    
Is it possible for device to communicate with server in background? I just thinking of a way to exchange data without the mess of setting up a push notification –  Burf2000 Mar 9 '11 at 22:40
    
Again, I think we need more detail... are you sending data to the server, or receiving data from the server? What triggers the exchange? –  wpearse Mar 9 '11 at 23:13
    
Updated. Thanks –  Burf2000 Mar 10 '11 at 10:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have a number of options:

  • Push Notifications
    This is the most friendly for battery and device resources; requires a server-side implementation of the notification system, though. --- Possibly not what you are currently looking for, but definitely the "best" solution when it comes to instant notifications and network-loss handling.

  • Running the App in the background
    Apps can run in the background and keep checking a server for new data, etc... However, it is not guranteed that the application may run for a long time since iOS's process manager might put your App to sleep or quit it unexpectedly. --- Possibly comes closer to what you are looking for and might work for basic tests; but is not very reliable.

  • Supporting Multitasking
    This is obviously the "best" way to do it. Implement support for multitasking and have iOS wake up your application whenever traffic is detected. This can be done using the "voip" background-mode.

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I will have to do some research on multitasking. Do most apps use push notification then? e.g games –  Burf2000 Mar 10 '11 at 11:30
    
It really depends on what you want to do. For instance, if you are providing a instant messenger app and have a central server manage the connectivity; it's better to use Push Notifications, because they don't require any code to run on the device that "polls" for new data. Multitasking is basically to let iOS "call" your App when new data is available or something else happens. For games Push Notifications usually are sufficient. –  badcat Mar 10 '11 at 11:40
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Points 2 and 3 aren't quite right: (2) You can't just run an app in the background, but you can ask for up to 10 minutes of background processing time before the OS kills your app after the user closes it. (3) Multitasking can only be implemented for one of three app types: audio, GPS and VOIP. VOIP is a PITA because it requires persistent sockets (I'm using that method for an internal project at the moment). If your app is marked as one (or more) of those three app types, and your app doesn't use that type of background multitasking, Apple will reject it from the App Store. –  wpearse Mar 10 '11 at 19:04

Push Notifications sounds like your best bet. Rather than have the client check for updates every 5 minutes have the server tell your client when there is an update that it should be aware of.

Whether this is going to annoy your users or not depends on how frequently you're pushing updates. Notifications on iOS are fairly intrusive so use them sparingly.

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