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I'm working on making a logical right shift function in C using only bitwise operators. Here's what I have:

int logical_right_shift(int x, int n)
{
    int size = sizeof(int); // size of int

    // arithmetic shifts to create logical shift, return 1 for true
    return (x >> n) & ~(((x >> (size << 3) - 1) << (size << 3) -1)) >> (n-1);
}

This actually works for all cases except if n = 0. I've been trying to figure out a way to fix it so it will work for n = 0 as well, but I'm stuck.

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1  
You're making a logical right shift operator for a signed type? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Mar 9 '11 at 22:43
    
What's wrong with if (n == 0) { return x; } ? –  Mark Rushakoff Mar 9 '11 at 22:45
    
Using @Mark 's suggestion, you can change it to this (no guarantees it works): return (n == 0 ? x : (x >> n) & ~(((x >> (size << 3) - 1) << (size << 3) -1)) >> (n-1)); –  Mateen Ulhaq Mar 9 '11 at 22:47
    
@Dan: Did you want to allow casts in the answer? –  Jeremiah Willcock Mar 9 '11 at 22:57
1  
@Mark: The braces. ;-) –  R.. Mar 9 '11 at 23:10

7 Answers 7

int lsr(int x, int n)
{
  return (int)((unsigned int)x >> n);
}
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1  
This is the correct answer (modulo the unnecessary and ugly cast on the result). Right-shift of a negative value has implementation-defined behavior (or is it an implementation-defined value? I forget), so any implementation of your lsr function in terms of using the >> operator on a signed value is simply non-portable. –  R.. Mar 9 '11 at 23:12
    
One issue with this solution: strictly speaking, it has implementation-defined behavior in the case of n==0, since casting from an int to unsigned and back results in implementation defined behavior if the original value is negative. The first conversion must happen modulo UINT_MAX+1, but the conversion back to signed int might simply be a reinterpretation of the representation, in which case the value would be changed. –  R.. Mar 9 '11 at 23:14

This is what you need:

int logical_right_shift(int x, int n)
{
    int size = sizeof(int) * 8; // usually sizeof(int) is 4 bytes (32 bits)
    return (x >> n) & ~(((0x1 << size) >> n) << 1);
}

Explain

x >> n shifts n bits right. However, if x is negative, the sign bit (left-most bit) will be copied to its right, for example:

Assume every int is 32 bits here, let
x     = -2147483648 (10000000 00000000 00000000 00000000), then
x >> 1 = -1073741824 (11000000 00000000 00000000 00000000)
x >> 2 = -536870912  (11100000 00000000 00000000 00000000)
and so on.

So we need to erase out those sign extra sign bits when n is negative.

Assume n = 5 here:

0x1 << size moves 1 to the left-most position:

(10000000 00000000 00000000 00000000)

((0x1 << size) >> n) << 1 copies 1 to its n-1 neighbors:

(11111000 00000000 00000000 00000000)

~((0x1 << size) >> n) << 1! reverses all bits:

(00000111 11111111 11111111 11111111)

so we finally obtain a mask to extract what really need from x >> n:

(x >> n) & ~(((0x1 << size) >> n) << 1)

the & operation does the trick.

And the total cost of this function is 6 operations.

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1  
I think this is correct. But can you do left shift by 32 times? That will be an undefined shift? –  Timothy Leung Aug 17 '13 at 5:13
1  
Yes, if int is, for example, 4 bytes, this fails. He needs to subtract 1 from size so that if int is 4 bytes, sizeis 31. –  Lucas Jul 25 '14 at 2:29

Just store your int in an unsigned int, and perform >> upon it.

(The sign is not extended or preserved if you use unsigned int)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logical_shift

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Derived from php's implementation of logical right shifting

function logical_right_shift( i , shift ) {

    if( i & 2147483648 ) {
        return ( i >> shift ) ^ ( 2147483648 >> ( shift - 1 ) );
    }

    return i >> shift;
}

For 32bit platforms only.

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As with @Ignacio's comment, I don't know why you would want to do this (without just doing a cast to unsigned like in the other answers), but what about (assuming two's complement and binary, and that signed shifts are arithmetic):

(x >> n) + ((1 << (sizeof(int) * CHAR_BIT - n - 1)) << 1)

or:

(x >> n) ^ ((INT_MIN >> n) << 1)
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I think problem is in your ">> (n-1)" part. If n is 0 then left part will be shift by -1. So,here is my solution

int logical_right_shift(int x, int n)
{
  int mask = ~(-1 << n) << (32 - n);
  return  ~mask & ( (x >> n) | mask); 
}
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Milnex's answer is great and has an awesome explanation, but the implementation unfortunately fails due to the shift by total size. Here is a working version:

int logicalShift(int x, int n) {
  int totalBitsMinusOne = (sizeof(int) * 8) - 1; // usually sizeof(int) is 4 bytes (32 bits)
  return (x >> n) & ~(((0x1 << totalBitsMinusOne) >> n) << 1);
}

To have 1 as the most significant bit, and all zeroes elsewhere, we need to shift 0x1 by number of bits - 1. I am submitting my own answer because my edit to the accepted answer was somehow rejected.

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