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Is it possible to execute a proc within the context of another object?

I know that normally you'd do proc.call(foo), and then the block should define a parameter. I was wondering though whether I could get "self" to bind to foo so that it's not necessary to have a block parameter.

proc = Proc.new { self.hello }

class Foo
  def hello
    puts "Hello!"
  end
end

foo = Foo.new

# How can proc be executed within the context of foo
# such that it outputs the string "Hello"?

proc.call
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up vote 37 down vote accepted
foo.instance_eval &proc

instance_eval can take a block instead of a string, and the & operator turns the proc into a block for use with the method call.

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foo.instance_eval(&poc) – Alex Wayne Feb 8 '09 at 8:18
    
Can anyone give me a documentation link for this? It certainly works (and is really awesome), but I'd like to read the docs. :) – Josh Glover Apr 6 '11 at 11:39
1  
@Josh Glover: ruby-doc.org/core-1.8.7/classes/Object.html#M000005 – Chuck Apr 6 '11 at 15:44
7  
If you run foo.instance_exec(params, &proc) you can also pass parameters to the function in the context. – Sideshowcoder Jan 13 '14 at 15:26
    
Just used the @Sideshowcoder solution on Capybara to reuse some block of code and I had a nerd/devgarsm. Made my code so much beautiful. Thanks – cassioscabral Dec 22 '15 at 19:15

This is for ruby 1.9:

class MyCat
  def initialize(start, &block)
    @elsewhere = start
    define_singleton_method(:run_elsewhere, block) if block_given?
  end
end
MyCat.new('Hello'){ @elsewehere << ' world' }.run_elsewhere
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