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I've been asking couple of questions before concerning my database analysis. I am grateful for all the replies yet here is another question.

I am trying to fetch route data and airlines that are complement to each other. Meaning, two routes share a node: Route 1's destination airport is route 2's source airport. I was able to get all the complementary routes by simply using WHERE clause, but here is a problem. I want to find the routes that are complementary to each other, BUT route 2's destination airport should not be one of route 1's destination airport. In other words, the airline servicing route 1 should not be able to reach route 2's destination on its own.

I have three tables:

name: complement
fields: route_id1, route_id2, airline_id1, airline_id2, source_airport, node_airport, destination_airport

name: airlines
fields: id(PK), name, iata_code

name: routes
fields: id(PK), airline_id, source_airport, destination_airport

I believe these three tables are needed to create a query for this requirement. Please let me know if you need further table information.

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Is the Complement table derived from the airlines and routes tables? –  Daniel Williams Mar 10 '11 at 0:18

2 Answers 2

I'm not entirely sure the purpose of your complement table, so I ignored it. (Could it actually contain the information you need already? Or are you going to load the results of your investigation into that table?)

Given a list of routes, I believe the following query would provide a list of consecutive routes whose first destination is the second source, not serviced by the same airline. The subquery is key - it will ensure that the airline from route1 does not have routes that reach the destination of route 2.

SELECT *
FROM routes route1 INNER JOIN routes route2
    ON route1.destination_airport=route2.source_airport
WHERE route1.airline_id<>route2.airline_id
    AND NOT EXISTS (
        SELECT * 
        FROM routes subqryRoutes
        WHERE subqryRoutes.airline_id=route1.airline_id
            AND subqryRoutes.destination_airport=route2.destination_airport
    )

Disclaimer: This is from memory, I haven't tested it.

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Here is my solution. I am assuming that "airline" means a flight, which is an airplane flying to multiple airports on a regular basis. The only table I will use I call "PlanePorts", which lists flight and the airport the flight is at. Does not matter if it's a source or destination.

The question is this (in my mind, maybe incorrect): Identify a route where a plane goes to the same airport as another plane on another route. Find all routes such that the two planes share only one common airport. If you know that, then you know that the two routes complement each other without overlap.

In this way, you can find all routes which complement each other. In the real world you would add the component of time to see if the planes arrive within a certain interval and in the right order, but that's just icing on the cake, some filters to add once the main part is solved.

In the example I have three routes: UA123 goes to DEN, MCO and then MSY SW456 goes to DAL, MSY then SAN, so it overlaps with UA123 only once F0000 goes to 000, which is just unrelated junk AA121 goes to CHI, MSY, and MCO so it overlaps UA123, but more than once

In the queries below we find that only SW456 complements UA123.

DROP TABLE PlanePort
CREATE TABLE PlanePort (
  id integer
, airline varchar(10)
, airport varchar(3)
) 

INSERT INTO PlanePort(id, airline, airport) VALUES ( 1, 'UA123','DEN');
INSERT INTO PlanePort(id, airline, airport) VALUES ( 2, 'UA123','MSY');
INSERT INTO PlanePort(id, airline, airport) VALUES ( 3, 'UA123','MCO');
INSERT INTO PlanePort(id, airline, airport) VALUES ( 4, 'SW456','DAL');
INSERT INTO PlanePort(id, airline, airport) VALUES ( 5, 'SW456','MSY');
INSERT INTO PlanePort(id, airline, airport) VALUES ( 6, 'SW456','SAN');
INSERT INTO PlanePort(id, airline, airport) VALUES ( 7, 'F0000','000');
INSERT INTO PlanePort(id, airline, airport) VALUES ( 8, 'AA121','CHI');
INSERT INTO PlanePort(id, airline, airport) VALUES ( 9, 'AA121','MSY');
INSERT INTO PlanePort(id, airline, airport) VALUES (10, 'AA121','MCO');

SELECT * FROM PlanePort

-- find planes which go to the same place - this will be repeat each one twice
SELECT *
FROM PlanePort P1
INNER JOIN PlanePort P2
  ON P2.airport = P1.airport
 AND P2.airline != P1.airline
WHERE 1=1

-- how many of these flights above have one other route in common?
-- only get the flight with no others in common!
SELECT Flight1, Flight2, count(*)
FROM (
    SELECT P1.airline as Flight1, P1.Airport, P2.airline as Flight2
    FROM PlanePort P1
    INNER JOIN PlanePort P2
      ON P2.airport = P1.airport
     AND P2.airline != P1.airline
    WHERE 1=1
) as Q1
GROUP BY Q1.Flight1, Q1.Flight2
HAVING count(Q1.airport) < 2

Cheers,

Daniel

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