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I'm trying to set a variable I previously set in a Perl script as an environment variable, but it seems to not realize the parameter I'm passing in is a variable and not the actual path I want.

For example, when I run this:

$ENV{'ENV_VARIABLE'}='\'$file_path\'';
print($ENV{'ENV_VARIABLE'});

I only get:

'$file_path'

Is there any way I can tell it that what I'm passing in is actually a variable and not a literal string?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

In Perl, single quoted strings do not interpolate variables. You want to use a double quote:

$ENV{'ENV_VARIABLE'}= "'$file_path'";

In that line, the rvalue is interpreted as q{'} . $file_path . q{'} where q{'} is a fancy way of writing '\'', which is a bit harder to read.

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This worked!! Thanks so much. –  beans Mar 10 '11 at 0:16
2  
@beans, since it worked, you should mark as correct. –  Joel Berger Mar 10 '11 at 1:35

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