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I'd like to know if it's possible to inherit from boost::function.

Basically, for ease of use, what I'd like to is have a type "Delegate" which is basically a boost::function. It's just for ease of use in some code I'm writing.

I at one point typedef'd boost::function to Delegate, but typedef'ing in my experience plays hell with gdb stuff. Especially if it's templated, so I wanted to avoid that (ever try debugging stl containers that've been typdeffed? oofta).

I found some code online which gave some sort of an example:

template<class Signature>
class Delegate : public boost::function<Signature>
{
public: 
    using boost::function<Signature>::operator();
};

Now, as I attempt to use it I get some errors. A usage example would be:

Tank * tankptr = new Tank();
Delegate<void ()> tankShoot(boost::bind(boost::mem_fn(&Tank::Shoot),tankptr));

This yields errors such as

error: no matching function for call to ‘Delegate<void ()()>::Delegate(boost::_bi::bind_t<boost::_bi::unspecified, boost::_mfi::mf0<void, Tank>, boost::_bi::list1<boost::_bi::value<Tank*> > >)’
Delegate.h:26: note: candidates are: Delegate<void ()()>::Delegate()
Delegate.h:26: note:                 Delegate<void ()()>::Delegate(const Delegate<void()()>&)

If I had to guess why I'm getting these errors, I'd have to say it's cause I'm missing some kind of copy constructor that takes whatever base a boost::bind constructor returns.

Any thoughts on how I can get past this hurdle, or anyone able to point me to good examples of inheriting from boost::function?

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2 Answers 2

Deriving from a class does not automatically 'inherit' the base class constructors for the derived class. You will need to create all required constructors there.

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I was just getting at posting a similar answer. He's going to need a constructor that takes boost::function<> and passes it to the base class. –  lefticus Mar 10 '11 at 3:13
    
I figured as much. Any examples of this being done that anyone knows of? I'm having trouble with the syntax and would benefit from a good example. –  sbrett Mar 10 '11 at 18:31
    
Ah, I think I figured it out. I had to do something like template<class Signature> class Delegate : public boost::function<Signature> { public: using boost::function<Signature>::operator(); Delegate() : boost::function<Signature>() {} Delegate(const boost::function<Signature>& x) : boost::function<Signature>(x) {} }; (My formatting is terrible, apologies). –  sbrett Mar 10 '11 at 19:12
    
@sbrett: You could also just implement a template ctor template<class Functor> Delegate(Functor f) : boost::function<Signature>(f){} and rely on the Boost.Function ctors. –  Xeo Mar 11 '11 at 2:36

hKaiser was correct in my needing to write the required constructors.

I had a hell of a time of it, until I found the interface file for the boost class "function" on their website.

In the end I ended up with something like:

template<class Signature>
class Delegate : public boost::function<Signature>
{
public:
  ///use the functor operator from the original class
  using boost::function<Signature>::operator();

  ///base constructor for our new type, 
  Delegate() : boost::function<Signature>() {/*empty*/}

  ///copy constructor for our new type
  Delegate(const boost::function<Signature>& x) : boost::function<Signature>(x) {/*empty*/}

  Delegate& operator=(const Delegate & _delegate)
  {
    boost::function<Signature> x = _delegate;
    try
    {
      dynamic_cast<boost::function<Signature> & >(*this) = x;
    }
    catch(bad_cast &bc)
    {
      cout << "Bad Cast Exception. " << bc.what();
      int * ptr = NULL;
      *ptr = 1; //force seg fault instead of assert
    }
    return *this;
  }
};

I'm not sure if I'm properly using the dynamic_cast (in the context of adhering to good coding practices) or if I even need it there in the assignment operator, but it does work, and works extremely well.

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Wanted to add a bit more to this,Acutally, although the above works on compiler gcc 4.1.1 –  sbrett Mar 12 '11 at 1:43

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