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I'm currently restricted to only using JRE 1.4 (java runtime environment) and i have a class which has some current time calculations. I am trying to unit test the class but it seems quite hard as all the mocking tools that i have encountered require annotations which aren't support by JRE1.4.

I'd tried using a JRE 1.4 friendly version of mockito but that does not allow me to mock out static classes. Jmockit has a super easy solution that's available to download BUT there doesn't seem to be a JRE1.4 friendly version of Jmockit

There's two ways i could have gotten around this if i were using JRE1.5 and above (mock out the method that calls for current time or just mock out the current system time), but sadly i am not.

The only solution for this is to just pass the current system time into the methods with +/- a day/month/year.

I would however like to do it the mocking way if possible under the JRE 1.4 environment.

Thanks

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5 Answers

Why not simply use Java 5 for test code only? With a decent IDE, you should be able to have separate modules/projects for test code (Java 5+) and production code (Java 1.4).

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Besides Zsolt's solution (creating a wrapper), another possible one is extracting the call to a method, and then testing against a subclass which overrides that method.

Code to be tested:

class A{
    protected long now(){
        return System.currentTimeMillis();
    }
}

Unit test:

class ATest{
    public void testStuff(){
        // actual test
    }

    class MyA extends A {
        long currentTime;

        protected long now(){
            return currentTime;
        }
    }
}

I prefer the wrapper approach, but subclassing might be useful in some cases.

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@yoshi594 I've read the comments on Zsolt's answer after writing mine. Since you cannot change the code, this solutions doesn't work either. Sorry. –  JoaoHornburg Aug 23 '11 at 20:36
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I suggest to use a wrapper when you deal with static methods. For example in your case, you could use a TimeWrapper:

public class TimeWrapper() {
    public long getCurrentTimeInMillis() {
        return System.currentTimeMillis();
    }
}

Inject the TimeWrapper, when you must get the current time in your other classes. This solution doesn't depend on mocking frameworks and jdks.

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Well i forgot to mention that i'm just unit testing the class and not changing the code inside. What i have tried to do before was subclass the method that calls for the current time and inject that when needed, but it still calls the original method. –  yoshi594 Mar 10 '11 at 6:57
    
I see. If you cannot change the code, go with @UWe's solution an try easymock. On the other hand it is not wise to mix mocking frameworks (one reason is that they may use different JUnitRunners which will make your test code hard to read and maintain), so if you decide and go with easymock, you may have to convert your old test cases. –  Zsolt Mar 10 '11 at 9:16
    
Yea i will try to use easy mock. will let you guys know if i'm successful or not =) –  yoshi594 Mar 11 '11 at 1:45
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easymock doesn't require annotations, so it will work with 1.4.

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cheers, i'll try this and let you know how it turns out :) –  yoshi594 Mar 11 '11 at 1:45
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Or use a special class for all time-related methods, like DateHelper Then you can mock this in your UnitTests and change the time via a static variable.

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