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I'd like to write a simple unit of work class that would behave like this:

using (var unitOfWork = new UnitOfWork())
{
   // Call the data access module and don't worry about transactions.
   // Let the Unit of Work open a session, begin a transaction and then commit it.
}

This is what I have so far (any comments will be welcome if you think my design is wrong):

class UnitOfWork : IDisposable
{
   ISession _session;
   ITransation _transaction;
   .
   .
   .
   void Dispose()
   {
      _transaction.Commit();
      _session.Dispose();
   }
}

What I would like to do is to roll back the transaction in case the data acess code threw some exception. So the Dispose() method would look something like:

   void Dispose()
   {
      if (Dispose was called because an exception was thrown) 
      {
         _transaction.Commit();
      }
      else
      {
         _transaction.RollBack();
      }
      _session.Dispose();
   }

Does it make sense? And if so, how can it be done?

share|improve this question

The "Dispose()" should have nothing to do with transaction commit or rollback. You should dispose you transaction in your Dispose() method. Changing the semantics of your Dispose() method will only add to confusion in the long run for you and anyone else using your class.

The Transaction's Commit() and RollBack() methods have nothing whatsoever to do with a Dispose() method since there is no correlation between these two method and Dispose(), since you have to dispose a transaction no matter what the final outcome is.

This is the correct pattern to use as regards connections and transactions. Notice that Roolback(0 relates to an exception (and not dispose)

connection.Open();
var trasnaction = null;
try
{
  transaction = connection.BeginTransaction(); 
  ///Do Some work
  transaction.Commit();
}
catch
{
  transaction.Rollback();
}
finally
{
  if (transaction != null)
    transaction.Dispose();
  connection.Close();
}

So mimic this pattern in your UnitOfWork, with methods for Commit(), Roolback() and Dispose().

share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly what I want to avoid. I don't expect the user to remember to call Commit() in the end of each block. I want the Commit() to happen by itself. But never mind, I think I've come to a good solution. I'll post it next week. – Ilya Kogan Mar 10 '11 at 17:51
    
@llya, not sure why the "user" has to call or do anything besides initiate the process. The code I've shown is part of a method. The user should only have to initiate the process (call the method). – Shiv Kumar Mar 10 '11 at 18:57
    
Rollback in a Dispose is entirely proper and idiomatic. Whenever possible, a class should be designed so that any object which isn't going to be used again may be safely abandoned after calling IDisposable.Dispose, without having to do anything else. If a database requires that any transaction that isn't ultimately going to be Commit'ed should be Rollback'ed, it is much cleaner for the connection object to be encapsulated in such a way to allow its responsibility to be handled via IDisposable.Dispose than to require some non-standard mechanism to ensure it's left in a reasonable state. – supercat Mar 11 '11 at 21:26

You need to UnitOfWork.Commit() at the end of the using block. Inside UnitOfWork you have a committed flag that you check in UnitOfWork.Dispose. If the flag is false there, then you UnitOfWork.Rollback().

share|improve this answer

The point of Dispose is that it is always run. And by using this commit-rollback idiom you don't need to know the difference.

using (var unitOfWork = new UnitOfWork())
{
    // use unitOfWork here - No need to worry about transactions for this code.
    unitOfWork.Commit();
}

Here we see that either an exception is thrown or the unitOfWork is committed. We can then have a bool in UnitOfWork keeping track whether the Commit was executed or not. Then the Dispose can Rollback not commited. This way the unit-of-work is always either rollbacked or commited.

I would in any case avoid having the Commit inside the Dispose. For starters a ITransaction.Commit method typically may throw exceptions on errors - This is perfectly normal. However, the Dispose method is not supposed to throw exceptions. See this link and search on Stackoverflow for more indepth information on why.

I'm thinking something like this in big strokes

class UnitOfWork : IDisposable
{
   ISession _session;
   ITransation _transaction;
   bool _commitTried;

   // stuff goes here

   void Commit()
   {
      _commitTried = true;
      _transaction.Commit();
   }

   void Dispose()
   {
      if (!_commitTried) _transaction.Rollback();
      _transaction.Dispose();
      _session.Dispose();
   }
}

The problem with forgetting to call Commit altogether I would say is not that big since unless commited, the client code will not work since the transaction is Rollback'ed and changes are not applied which will be discovered when exercising the code inside a fixture or manually.

I actually tried to deal with this in one project by using a syntax with lambdas like so

_repository.InTransactionDo(ThisMethodIsRunInsideATransaction);

This way clients did not need to worry about Commiting anything. I actually ended up regretting this since it complicated things too much and wished I hade gone with the above approach.

share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly what I want to avoid. I don't expect the user to remember to call Commit() in the end of each block. I want the Commit() to happen by itself. But never mind, I think I've come to a good solution. I'll post it next week. – Ilya Kogan Mar 10 '11 at 17:50
    
Alright, I'm going to edit my post a bit to direct that. Looking forward to your post then! – vidstige Mar 11 '11 at 7:18
    
@Ilya Kogan Edited my post a bit to adress the problem with users forgetting to call Commit(). – vidstige Mar 11 '11 at 7:37
    
@vidstige This is exactly what I'm intending to do, great minds think alike :) – Ilya Kogan Mar 11 '11 at 13:39
1  
@vidstige: The Consensus Problem means that when dealing with a remote system there will always be a possibility of a commit failing in such fashion that the code attempting to perform it won't know whether it succeeded or not unless or until it can query the remote system. If the factor that caused the commit failure makes the remote system unavailable (e.g. a break in communications) that might not be possible for awhile. Rollbacks that can't be proven to have occurred can easily occur if communications are unreliable. Genuinely failed rollbacks are rare, but should be VERY alarming. – supercat May 2 '13 at 19:19

A bit late to the game here, but check this post from Ayende for a (slightly mad) solution:

In the Dispose method, you just need to figure out whether or not it got there 'cleanly' - i.e. figure out if an unhandled exception exists before committing the transaction:

public class ExceptionDetector : IDisposable
{
    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (Marshal.GetExceptionCode()==0)
            Console.WriteLine("Completed Successfully!");
        else
            Console.WriteLine("Exception!");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
What are the exact semantics of that? What happens if one Dispose method chains to another method within a try/finally block? – supercat May 2 '13 at 19:24
    
if (Marshal.GetExceptionCode() == 0) _repository.CommitUnitOfWork(); – Squiggle May 13 '13 at 13:33
    
If one Dispose method within a finally block chains to another which is within a try/finally block, will the Marshal.GetExceptionCode report the status of the innermost block or the outer block, or what? – supercat May 13 '13 at 14:57
up vote 1 down vote accepted

After all, I implemented a method through which all operations should be performed:

class UnitOfWork : IDisposable
{
   ...
   public void DoInTransaction(Action<ISession> method)
   {
       Open session, begin transaction, call method, and then commit. Roll back if there was an exception.
   }
}
share|improve this answer

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