Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I began using Git last year and have enjoyed it so much that I'm considering switching over my largest, most active Subversion repo. Unfortunately, that repo contains several (related, but independant) projects.

There are many, many pages describing how to convert a single-project repo, but far fewer for multi-project repos. In fact, I've only found a few, and they all seem to assume that each project has its own trunk:

project1/
    branches/
    tags/
    trunk/
project2/
    branches/
    tags/
    trunk/
project3/
    branches/
    tags/
    trunk/

Regrettably, my Subversion repo looks something like this:

branches/
    *empty*
tags/
    project1-0.9/
    project1-1.0/
    project1-1.0.1/
    project2-0.9/
    project2-0.9.1/
    project3-0.5/
trunk/
    project1/
    project2/
    project3/

Worse, the tags are all created from the working copy (e.g. svn copy . svn://example.com/svn/tags/project1-1.0.2), so include small changes never commited to the trunk (mostly hard-coding version numbers). Also, there are a handful of commits which span all projects (license updates, etc.). Thankfully, at least, there are no merges!

Is there a clean way to untangle these projects while keeping my tags? If it helps, this would be a one-way conversion, with the Subversion repo taken offline afterward.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I used http://gitorious.org/svn2git/svn2git to do the very same thing. This tool was originally created to convert the huge KDE SVN repository to Git, which BTW is also laid out as your repository. All you have to do is writing a simple control file describing which directories correspond to which project and branch. In the end you have a nice set of git repositories for your projects.

One note though: There is no direct support for SVN tags. You will have to import them as Git branches and postprocess them, cf. http://gitorious.org/svn2git/svn2git/blobs/master/samples/merged-branches-tags.rules.

share|improve this answer
    
This tool sounds like it has a lot of promise, but I can't for the life of me get it to compile. :-/ –  Ben Blank Mar 11 '11 at 0:01
    
I used it under a Linux environment and I had no problems what so ever compiling it. Looking at src/src.pro I can only assume the original developers had no incentive to support other platforms as this fill uses the typical linux paths for shared libaries. Under Linux you need Qt and the development files for SVN to compile it. –  sebasgo Mar 11 '11 at 9:19
    
Yeah, I'm running Ubuntu Server and it doesn't want to install libqt4-devel without also installing X11. *rolls eyes* And of course, it won't compile at all under Windows. I'm still trying to find a third option. :-) –  Ben Blank Mar 11 '11 at 17:26
    
Well, the tool should compile and run perfectly well without X11 as it only depends on QtCore. But it seems Ubuntu decided not to split the Qt development packages into their modules, which is unfortunate. I guess the least time consuming option would be to obtain a Linux appliance to do the work there and run it as a virtual machine under Windows. –  sebasgo Mar 11 '11 at 18:12
    
That's what I'm doing now — installing Gentoo under VirtualBox. This has been considerably more work than I expected having to do before starting the conversion process. ;-) –  Ben Blank Mar 11 '11 at 20:08

http://repo.or.cz/w/svn-all-fast-export.git seems to take extensive rules files that can sort out your repository. I know from using git-svn (bidirectionally) that you can prune out substantial parts of the svn repo with no problems (including ignoring parts of a commit due to the svn root pointing deep into the repository or via --ignore-paths).

After you make your new repo you can use git-submodule to tie the back together if there are cross references.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not able to get git-svn to omit the tags from e.g. project2 and project3 when cloning project1. --ignore-paths doesn't seem to do the trick. –  Ben Blank Mar 11 '11 at 0:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.