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Hello I need to replace only single occurrence of substring Example:

Some sentence #x;#x;#x; with #x;#x; some #x; words #x; need in replacing.

Need replace only single #x; by #y; and get following string

Some sentence #x;#x;#x; with #x;#x; some #y; words #y; need in replacing.

Some note: My string will contain unicode chars and operator \b doesn't work.

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Please show the code you are trying to use. –  HBP Mar 10 '11 at 9:34
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can match #x; repeated any number of times, and only replace those where it occurs once:

sentence = sentence.replace(/((?:#x;)+)/g, function(m) {
  return m.length == 3 ? '#y;' : m;
});
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+1: I think this is better than the lookbehind workaround. It's certainly much easier to read. –  Mark Byers Mar 10 '11 at 9:47
    
Thank you guys for your answers. It's really helped. –  Ilya Mar 11 '11 at 10:05
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The simplest regular expression to match single occurences of #x; only would be to use a lookbehind and a lookahead assertion.

/(?<!#x;)#x;(?!#x;)/

However Javascript does not support lookbehinds so you can try this workaround using only lookaheads instead:

/(^[\S\s]{0,2}|(?!#x;)[\S\s]{3})#x;(?!#x;)/

Complete example:

> s = 'Some sentence #x;#x;#x; with #x;#x; some #x; words #x; need in replacing.'
> s = s.replace(/(^[\S\s]{0,2}|(?!#x;)[\S\s]{3})#x;(?!#x;)/g, '$1#y;')
"Some sentence #x;#x;#x; with #x;#x; some #y; words #y; need in replacing."
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A single #x; could qualify by having white-space before and after. In this case you could use this:

str.replace( /(\s+)#x;(\s+)/g, '$1#y;$2' )
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thanks for answer but sentence can doesn't have any spaces. –  Ilya Mar 11 '11 at 9:19
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use str.replace('/(#x;)+/g','#y;')

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1  
I think that you mean /(#x;){1}/g rather than '/#x;{1}/', but the {1} still doesn't keep it from replacing each occurance on it's own. –  Guffa Mar 10 '11 at 9:53
    
@Guffa yes, i mean that, thanks for correcting me :) –  diEcho Mar 10 '11 at 9:56
    
You still have apostrophes around it, so it's not a regular expression but a string. It will look for the text /(#x;)+/g in the string, not #x;. The change from {1} to + means that it will replace #x;#x;#x; with #y; instead of #y;#y;#y;, but it will still not only replace the single occurances. –  Guffa Mar 10 '11 at 13:09
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