Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to implement a simple char count of an UITextView while the user is typing in text (i.e. it should update continuously).

I have two problems.

(1) The first is that I don't know in which method I should put my charCount method. textViewShouldBeginEditing doesn't work, as it simply asks if an editing session should begin. textView:shouldChangeTextInRange doesn't work either, as it again asks if it is permitted to begin editing. I couldn't find other useful methods in the Apple doc.

(2) Next problem: I tried to call my charCount method from within another method. But I get the compiler error: 'ViewController' may not respond to 'charCount'.

Here is my humble attempt:

- (IBAction)charCount:(id)sender {

// all chars
int charsAsInt = (int)(textView.text.length);
NSString *newText = [[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:@"All chars: %d", charsAsInt];
allCharacters.text = newText;
[newText release];}

- (BOOL)textViewShouldBeginEditing:(UITextView *)aTextView {

    [self charCount];}

I guess it has to do with me trying to call a IBAction defined method that this won't work. But what would be the proper way to call a IBAction method from within a non-IBAction method?

As always, I'm sorry for these very basic questions and I do appreciate every little help to get my beginner's mind around this.

share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 26 down vote accepted

I used to create like this, for prevent UITextview to type only 140 characters.
And i shown that count in UILabel like this

-(void)textViewDidChange:(UITextView *)textView 
{
   int len = textView.text.length;
   lbl_count.text=[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%i",140-len];
}

- (BOOL)textView:(UITextView *)textView shouldChangeTextInRange:(NSRange)range replacementText:(NSString *)text
{
    if([text length] == 0)
    {
        if([textView.text length] != 0)
        {
            return YES;
        }
    }
    else if([[textView text] length] > 139)
    {
        return NO;
    }
    return YES;
} 

this may help for you!!!

share|improve this answer
2  
thanks! really helpful as well. –  n.evermind Mar 10 '11 at 11:17
1  
Did you disable paste in your view? If not it's quite easy to get more than 140 characters. Select 1 character and paste as much text as you want. –  Matthias Bauch Mar 10 '11 at 12:16
    
@Suresh.D thanks dear... It worked well :) –  iShwar Oct 5 '13 at 10:35
    
@Suresh.D there is one problem , as Matthias Bauch said, If i copy the text and keep it past on the textView its going beyong the number of characters we are limiting from the code with your solution, How should i solve it. Coz i want the cut/copy/paste functionality working, along with limiting in the characters enter by the user. –  iShwar Oct 5 '13 at 10:44
    
@iShwar to prevent users pasting in more than allowed, use the UITextFieldTextDidChangeNotification and in the target selector, implement a trim, like follows: if (myTextField.text.length > CHARACTER_MAX) { myTextField.text = [myTextField.text substringToIndex:CHARACTER_MAX]; } –  weienw Feb 4 at 16:19

textView:shouldChangeTextInRange doesn't work either, as it again asks if it is permitted to begin editing.

but nothing will prevent you from counting the characters in there too. Just return YES at the end.

I guess it has to do with me trying to call a IBAction defined method that this won't work

You can call IBActions from code. IBAction is just a key word for Interface Builder, but it is the same as void.

But you have to use the correct method signature.
Your method - (IBAction)charCount:(id)sender has one parameter (id sender)
But your call [self charCount] has no parameter.

change it to [self charCount:nil] and you should be fine.


Edit: I don't have a textView right now and I'm too lazy to create one now but this works with a UITextField:

- (BOOL)textField:(UITextField *)textField shouldChangeCharactersInRange:(NSRange)range replacementString:(NSString *)string {
    NSInteger textLength = 0;
    textLength = [textField.text length] + [string length] - range.length;
    NSLog(@"Length: %d", textLength);
    return YES;
}

I add the length of the replacement string to the current text of the field. Then I subtract the length of the replacement range.
You should do some experimentation to better understand the relationship between those 3.
Basically if you overwrite some text the length of the range will be the length of the text you want to overwrite (ie the length of the text that is selected)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks so much! You've been really helpful in the last couple of days, accompanying me on my journey to get a little hands-on-experience in programming. I've read a couple of books but nothing is like being faced with real problems and having such friendly people to help out. Thanks again! –  n.evermind Mar 10 '11 at 10:56
    
The only problem I have is that the update is always 1 behind. E.g. if you type in K, char count will show 0, if you type in KK, car count will show 1. I guess this is due to me calling calling the method shouldChange ... which only updates the count after I have typed in a letter. Is there a method like: finishedTyping? –  n.evermind Mar 10 '11 at 11:35
    
if UITextViews use the "value changed" action you could connect your count method to this action. like suresh suggested. But it's possible to calculate in shouldChangeCharacters.... See my edit. You can't do this in an extra method because you need all 3 parameters. –  Matthias Bauch Mar 10 '11 at 11:49

Thanks to n.evermind and Mathias Bauch for their contributions. Below is my solution for UITextField, which combines information from both and works like a charm to set a character limit as well as render a label which keeps track of current characters for the user.

- (BOOL)textField:(UITextField *)textField shouldChangeCharactersInRange:(NSRange)range replacementString:(NSString *)string
{
    int maxLength = 40;
    int textLength = [textField.text length] + [string length] - range.length;

    if(textLength > maxLength)
    {
        return NO;
    }
    else
    {
        //self.currentLabel in this case is just a UILabel
        //it formats the counter like: 0/40
        self.currentLabel.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%i/%i",textLength,maxLength];
        return YES;
    }
}

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer

Code Snippet to have a live word count updating the UI with color.

#define kCharacterMaximumLimit 120
#define kCharacterWarningLimit 110

- (void)textViewDidChange:(UITextView *)textView {
    NSString *substring = [NSString stringWithString:textView.text];
    _lblCount.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%i", kCharacterMaximumLimit-[substring length]];

    if (substring.length == 0)
        _lblCount.text = @"";

    if (substring.length < kCharacterWarningLimit)
        _lblCount.textColor = [UIColor darkGrayColor];

    if (substring.length >= kCharacterWarningLimit && substring.length < kCharacterMaximumLimit)
        _lblCount.textColor = [UIColor redColor];
}

- (BOOL)textView:(UITextView *)textView shouldChangeTextInRange:(NSRange)range replacementText:(NSString *)text
{
    if([text length] == 0)
    {
        if([textView.text length] != 0)
            return YES;
        else
            return NO;
    }

    if([[textView text] length] > kCharacterMaximumLimit-1)
        return NO;

    return YES;
}
share|improve this answer

@fluchtpunkt: works wonderfully! Here's the updated code in case there will ever be another beginner looking for the answer:

- (BOOL)textView:(UITextView *)textView shouldChangeTextInRange:(NSRange)range replacementText:(NSString *)text {

[self charCount:nil];

// let the textView know that it should handle the inserted text
return YES; }
share|improve this answer
    
Hello, how did you solve the problem that one char but char count is zero, two chars char count is one, etc? I faced with the same problem and couldn't find a solution –  LIAL Jun 5 '13 at 17:19

You can use this code let say You Only want 10 charactes in Your view and also want to update the count remain

lets assume coutLabel is the Label which we have to update. make sure you attached the delegate on nib file or in implementaion file.

-(BOOL)textView:(UITextView *)textView shouldChangeTextInRange:(NSRange)range replacementText:(NSString *)text
{
    NSInteger textLength = 0;
    textLength = [textView.text length] + [text length] - range.length;
    if(10-textLength==-1)
    {
        return NO;
    }
    coutLabel.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d characters remaining", 10-textLength];

    return YES;}
share|improve this answer

All you need to use is a textViewDidChange delegate implementation in your code. Here's a sample implementation you may need:

    #pragma-mark TextView Delegates

- (void)textViewDidChange:(UITextView *)textView
{
    NSLog(@"len:%d",textView.text.length);
    txtLength=textView.text.length;
    lblString=[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%i",210-txtLength];
    if(txtLength>200)
    {
        charactersLabel.textColor=[UIColor redColor];
    }
    charactersLabel.text=lblString;
}

Declare the three used variables in you header as:

int txtLength;
NSString *lblString;
IBOutlet UILabel *charactersLabel;

The label prints the characters left as you keep typing in and it's color changes to red when you go beyond 200 here. Finally don't forget to hookup the TextView's delegate to File's Owner & add the implementation for UITextViewDelegate in the header file. Hope it helps..

share|improve this answer

a simpler way for noobs is to implement an NStimer that checks the lenght every second

to do that add "NSTimer countTimer;" to your .h and then add this to your .m

-(void)viewDidLoad {

countTimer = [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:.1 target:self selector:@selector(countTextView) userInfo:nil repeats:YES];

}

-(void)countTextView{

[countTimer invalidate];
int currentChars = [TextView.text length];

if ([TextView.text length]>100) {
    UIAlertView * alert = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:@"Too long"
        message:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"Only 100 chars allowed."]
        delegate:nil
        cancelButtonTitle:@"OK"
        otherButtonTitles:nil];
    [alert show];
    [alert release];
    TextView.text = [TextView.text substringToIndex:100];
}

counterLabel.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d",currentChars];

countTimer = [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:.1 target:self selector:@selector(countTextView) userInfo:nil repeats:YES];

}

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this suggestion! –  n.evermind Apr 19 '11 at 19:01
5  
A 'simpler' way is also a worse way, don't do this. Let the textview tell you when it has changed, don't keep checking repeatedly. –  David Caunt Aug 25 '11 at 16:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.