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I'm trying to put together a very granulary loose coupled design.

But I can't decide how to handle common definitions.

Right now I seperate concerns by adding it as an external dll. Through injection and interfaces my domain can use my business logic without knowing the implementation.

The problem I'm having is that for all my components to be loosely coupled, they need to implement the same interfaces. My solution was a seperate project (dll) with just all the definitions. This started out well, but seems to become bloathed and chains all code together on this one dll-dependency.

What's the most pragmatic way to go about ?

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

EDIT

Sorry I think I initially misunderstood your question. So you have one assembly which contains your interfaces and you have your implementations in other assemblies using DI to create your dependant objects. I tend to create a core assembly in my application which holds the main behaviours of the app (smart entities, enums and interfaces). This assembly depends on little but is heavy depended on by the rest of the application. Check out this project as an example - whocanhelpme.codeplex.com. You could call this core bloated but it, by definition, needs to be very rich.


You might find that many of your abstract units follow common design patterns. Here is a site that gives a good description of each one - you may be able to derive names from these (Observer, Factory, Adapter etc.):

http://www.dofactory.com/Patterns/Patterns.aspx

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What I'm using is closest to the Factory method. But by loosely coupling my layers (GUI, Business, Service, Data) they all need to be aware of shared definitions (interfaces, enums, ..) of which concrete objects can get passed around. So they all need to be aware of the interfaces to use concrete instances, which creates a intersection and dependency on definition. If I try to extract them to a seperate dll, and I would get into my UserManagement logic, I'll also be loading definitions of my DAO objects fe. (much like needing a blueprint of a building when you want to open a door) –  Tim Mar 10 '11 at 12:06
    
Sorry I think I initially misunderstood your question. So you have one assembly which contains your interfaces and you have your implementations in other assemblies using DI to create your dependant objects. I tend to create a core assembly in my application which holds the main behaviours of the app (smart entities, enums and interfaces). This assembly depends on little but is heavy depended on by the rest of the application. Check out this project as an example - whocanhelpme.codeplex.com. You could call this core bloated but it, by definition, needs to be very rich. –  David Neale Mar 10 '11 at 13:02
    
Thanks! I'm checking it out and trying to get an overview of your architecture. I'll read up a bit more and try to rearrange my project to combine "core"-functionality instead of trying to make my interfaces/enums "exportable". –  Tim Mar 10 '11 at 13:26

I would say, that the layer should only know about the next layer and its interfaces, so it is fine to place interfaces along with their implementations and then add references between layers (assemblies) in the chain.

You can configure DI using bootstrapper pattern and resolve through the locator. Regarding cross cutting concerns like logging, caching ect there should be separate assembly referenced to each layer. Here you can also employ contracts and in the future perhaps replace these cross cutting functionalities with another assembly implementing the same contracts.

Hope this helps at least a bit :)

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