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I need to join 5 tables using Inner Join.

Is this a good practice or will it make any inconsistency in later years?

Just have a look

SELECT Distinct(email)
FROM AP_GROUPS_INTO_ORGANIZATION M 
INNER JOIN GROUPSDB G on G.ID = M.GROUPID
INNER JOIN aspnet_Roles r ON R.RoleName = G.GROUPNAME
INNER JOIN aspnet_UsersInRoles U ON U.RoleId = R.RoleId  
INNER JOIN aspnet_membership a on a.UserId = U.UserId
WHERE G.GROUPNAME = 'GROUP001'
share|improve this question
6  
5 JOINs is OK if that's what you need semantically. I'd probably change to WHERE EXISTS rather than JOIN then get rid of duplicates with DISTINCT though. Make sure you look at the query plan and add any required indexes on the FK columns. –  Martin Smith Mar 10 '11 at 11:34
1  
@Martin I would be wary of recommending the use of DISTINCT so freely. I have seen situations where developers write a query, see a bunch of duplicates and just stick in DISTINCT to get rid of them without understanding what is happening. Im not saying thats the case here but its just not something I would encourage people to use without some consideration. –  SecretDeveloper Mar 10 '11 at 11:58
1  
@Kaius - I definitely did not recommend DISTINCT I said the opposite to that in fact and that they should use WHERE EXISTS instead (though perhaps not strongly enough) –  Martin Smith Mar 10 '11 at 12:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This should be fine. I see you are using the aspnet tables in the query and i would advise against altering their structure or indexes without some testing first to ensure you dont create new problems.

Its pretty common to have this number of joins if your data is highly normalized.

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The only thing I would change, and its from the basis of putting the table basing your criteria restrictions up front instead of lower in the joined tables would be to move your groups table up front like... Additionally, the indentation helps to clearly show the relationships between tables.

SELECT
      Distinct(email)
   FROM
      GROUPSDB G
         INNER JOIN AP_GROUPS_INTO_ORGANIZATION M 
            ON G.ID = M.GROUPID
         INNER JOIN aspnet_Roles r
            ON G.GROUPNAME = R.RoleName
            INNER JOIN aspnet_UsersInRoles U 
               ON R.RoleId = U.RoleId
               INNER JOIN aspnet_membership a 
                  on U.UserId = a.UserId
   WHERE
      G.GROUPNAME = 'GROUP001'
share|improve this answer

Although there is absolutely nothing wrong with:

SELECT Distinct(email)
FROM 
    AP_GROUPS_INTO_ORGANIZATION M 
        INNER JOIN 
    GROUPSDB G 
        ON G.ID = M.GROUPID
        INNER JOIN 
    aspnet_Roles r 
        ON R.RoleName = G.GROUPNAME
        INNER JOIN 
    aspnet_UsersInRoles U 
        ON U.RoleId = R.RoleId  
        INNER JOIN aspnet_membership a 
        ON a.UserId = U.UserId
WHERE 
    G.GROUPNAME = 'GROUP001'

fomatted as I prefer personally now that formatting has entered the picture, WHAT IF your server is configured for cASE sENSITIVE ( pun intended) comparisons maybe you want to change:
ON R.RoleName = G.GROUPNAME to ON LOWER(R.RoleName) = LOWER(G.GROUPNAME)
and G.GROUPNAME = 'GROUP001' to LOWER(G.GROUPNAME) = LOWER('GROUP001')

This will prevent future errors hopefully.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 Wrapping all columns used in JOINs in functions that make the JOIN predicates completely unsargable is a terrible idea. –  Martin Smith Mar 10 '11 at 16:43
    
@Martin I don't understand what you mean? What is unsargable. Also Are you down voting because of formatting preferences which are really personal preferences?? The answer is making a more important point, have you read it?? –  mohsensajjadi Mar 10 '11 at 17:51
    
No nothing to do with personal formatting preferences! unsargable means an index cannot be used for the join. –  Martin Smith Mar 10 '11 at 23:49

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