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The following is a common typo with language newcomers, who think that they are defining an object but are actually declaring a function:

struct T
{
   void foo() {}
};

int main()
{
   T obj();
   obj.foo();
}

GCC 4.1.2's error is:

In function 'int main()':
Line 9: error: request for member 'foo' in 'obj', which is of non-class type 'T ()()'
compilation terminated due to -Wfatal-errors.

Why is the reported type in the message T ()()? I'd have expected T ().

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

IIRC this is just a compiler bug. GCC 4.4 says T() while 4.2 says T()() for me.

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Oh, meh. Yea, 4.4.1 gives me the output I expected too. Thanks! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 10 '11 at 11:48

The error is best understood when you realize that you usually don't write out function types without naming at least the function, but it's a bit more common for function pointers.

For instance, int (*fooPtr)() names the pointer. If you omit the name, you have int (*)(). Now, going from function pointer to function type would give you int ()().

There's no real standard here, because ISO C++ doesn't define canonical names for all types. For instance, const volatile int is the same type as volatile const int, and neither form is canonical.

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1  
OK, but then when you provide a "function type" to, say, std::function, you write std::function<int()>(...). –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 10 '11 at 13:28
    
Indeed. And in fact int()() could (should?) be parsed as a function that returns an int() (!). But the question was to explain a GCC error. –  MSalters Mar 10 '11 at 13:47
    
I know what the question was; I wrote it. :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 10 '11 at 15:16

Change

T obj();

to

T obj;  

T obj(); is function declaration with name "obj", return value type T and which accepts no parameters.

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Read the question again. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 10 '11 at 12:10
    
Didn't noticed that you are complaining of the value of compiler error message)) –  Hovhannes Grigoryan Mar 10 '11 at 12:12
    
@Tomalak Geret'kal who cares of that extra () stuff in the error?)) in any event +1 for the question;) –  Hovhannes Grigoryan Mar 10 '11 at 12:13
    
@Hovhannes. I do. That's why I posted the question. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 10 '11 at 12:13
    
@Tomalak Compilers are always giving messy errors. If you want better error try comeaucomputing.com/tryitout it says: expression must have class type –  Hovhannes Grigoryan Mar 10 '11 at 12:24

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