Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following EBNF that I want to parse:

PostfixExp      -> PrimaryExp ( "[" Exp "]" 
                                | . id "(" ExpList ")" 
                                | . length )*

And this is what I got:

def postfixExp: Parser[Expression] = (
    primaryExp ~ rep(
        "[" ~ expression ~ "]"
        | "." ~ ident ~"(" ~ repsep(expression, "," ) ~ ")" 
        | "." ~ "length") ^^ {
        case primary ~ list =>  list.foldLeft(primary)((prim,post) =>
                post match {
                    case "[" ~ length ~ "]" => ElementExpression(prim, length.asInstanceOf[Expression])
                    case "." ~ function ~"(" ~ arguments ~ ")" =>  CallMethodExpression(prim, function.asInstanceOf[String], arguments.asInstanceOf[List[Expression]])
                    case _ => LengthExpression(prim)
                }
            )
    })

But I would like to know if there is a better way, preferably without having to resort to casting (asInstanceOf).

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I would do it like this:

type E = Expression

def postfixExp = primaryExp ~ rep(
    "[" ~> expr <~ "]" ^^ { e => ElementExpression(_:E, e) }
  | "." ~ "length" ^^^ LengthExpression
  | "." ~> ident ~ ("(" ~> repsep(expr, ",") <~ ")") ^^ flatten2 { (f, args) =>
      CallMethodExpression(_:E, f, args)
    }
) ^^ flatten2 { (e, ls) => collapse(ls)(e) }

def expr: Parser[E] = ...

def collapse(ls: List[E=>E])(e: E) = {
  ls.foldLeft(e) { (e, f) => f(e) }
}

Shortened expressions to expr for brevity as well as added the type alias E for the same reason.

The trick that I'm using here to avoid the ugly case analysis is to return a function value from within the inner production. This function takes an Expression (which will be the primary) and then returns a new Expression based on the first. This unifies the two cases of dot-dispatch and bracketed expressions. Finally, the collapse method is used to merge the linear List of function values into a proper AST, starting with the specified primary expression.

Note that LengthExpression is just returned as a value (using ^^^) from its respective production. This works because the companion objects for case classes (assuming that LengthExpression is indeed a case class) extend the corresponding function value delegating to their constructor. Thus, the function represented by LengthExpression takes a single Expression and returns a new instance of LengthExpression, precisely satisfying our needs for the higher-order tree construction.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.