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When I use System.Windows.Forms.Timer class and finish using it then I can't disable it.. it ticks even if I set its property Enabled to false. What is wrong with the code? here is an example:

int counter = 0;
private void timer1_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e) { 
    MessageBox.Show("Hello"); 
    counter++; 
    if (counter == 10){
       timer1.Enabled = false;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Where in all this is counter declared, and how? – Michael Kjörling Mar 10 '11 at 13:20
up vote 7 down vote accepted

This is a subtle bug that's induced by the MessageBox.Show() call. MessageBox pumps a message loop to keep the UI alive. Which allows the Tick event handler to run again, even though it is already active from the previous tick. The counter variable doesn't get incremented until you click the OK button. As a result, the screen fills with message boxes and that won't stop until you click the OK button ten times.

You need to increment the counter before showing the message box. Fix:

int counter = 0;
private void timer1_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e) { 
    counter++; 
    if (counter > 10) timer1.Enabled = false;
    else MessageBox.Show("Hello"); 
}

This kind of problem is also the reason that DoEvents() got such a bad reputation. It is pretty difficult to write code that can properly deal with the re-entrancy induced by the message loop. You need to keep boolean flags around that indicate that code is already active. Which is another way to solve your problem:

int counter = 0;
bool showingBox = false;

private void timer1_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e) { 
    if (showingBox) return;
    showingBox = true;
    try {
        MessageBox.Show("Hello"); 
        counter++;
        if (counter == 10) timer1.Enabled = false;
    }
    finally {
        showingBox = false;
    }
}

You now get only one message box at a time, probably what you are really looking for.

I should mention that this re-entrancy problem is pretty specific to timers. A dialog takes counter-measures to avoid re-entrancy problems, it disables all the windows in the application. That ensures that the user cannot do things like closing the main window or clicking a button that brings up the dialog again. Both rather disastrous mishaps. That takes care of most of the 'unexpected' Windows notifications, basically any of the messages that are generated by the user. The edge case is a timer (WM_TIMER is not disabled) whose event handler has a UI effect.

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Thank you so verry much! Been handling this problem the whole day! – Mathlight Oct 28 '13 at 15:15

It is because the MessageBox.Show blocks until the user presses OK.
The code below the MessageBox will not execute until after 10 OK buttons are pressed.
But the timer continues to fire even if the execution is blocked.

Try this code

int counter = 0;
private void timer1_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e) { 
    counter++; 
    if (counter == 10){
       timer1.Enabled = false;
    }
    MessageBox.Show("Hello"); 
}

(just moved the MessageBox)

share|improve this answer
    
not the mbx itself. Event if there's no user-interface code, it doesn't stop – Desolator Mar 10 '11 at 13:31
1  
If I take your code above and replace the MessageBox with Console.WriteLine it stops after 10 iterations. You must have something else wrong in your code. You need to show more code. – Albin Sunnanbo Mar 10 '11 at 13:35

What about timer1.Stop()? I am not too familiar with this class, but looked it up quickly: Timer Class

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3  
Stop does nothing but this.Enabled = false;. – Bobby Mar 10 '11 at 13:22
    
virtual -1. Calling the Start method is the same as setting Enabled to true. Likewise, calling the Stop method is the same as setting Enabled to false. – Aliostad Mar 10 '11 at 13:23
    
"Calling the Start method is the same as setting Enabled to true. Likewise, calling the Stop method is the same as setting Enabled to false." from your link – Andrey Mar 10 '11 at 13:24
    
Gee, it wasn't necessary to have three comments on this answer all saying the same thing... – BoltClock Mar 10 '11 at 13:33
    
Sorry - you guys are right. My main goal was to link the developer to the tool necessary to answer the question, but you are right - I should have done due diligence. – skaz Mar 10 '11 at 13:34

try this:

int counter = 0;
private void timer1_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e) { 
    MessageBox.Show("Hello"); 
    counter++; 
    if (counter == 10){
       timer1.Stop();
       timer1.Dispose();
       timer1 = null;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
We have made the reference null but what about the object itself? it stills alive – Desolator Mar 10 '11 at 13:27
    
no no it is not going to exist anymore. – JAiro Mar 10 '11 at 13:30

It is also working for me. I placed the timer in the form, on the button click, I am calling timer1.start() and I put the following code in the tick event and its working.

int i = 0;
private void timer1_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    i++;
    this.Text = i.ToString();
    if (i == 10)
    {
        timer1.Enabled = false;
    }
}

You need to call Stop.

int i = 0;
private void timer1_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    i++;
    if (i == 10)
    {
        timer1.Stop();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
4  
"calling the Stop method is the same as setting Enabled to false." – Andrey Mar 10 '11 at 13:25
    
You have removed the magic MessageBox, that is the tricky (but not obvious) part. – Albin Sunnanbo Mar 10 '11 at 13:31
    
@Albin Sunnanbo: It really irritating with small interval. – Anuraj Mar 10 '11 at 13:33

I'm pretty sure the MessageBox is the culprit here. Maybe if you use a short execution interval for the timer handler then this could potentially cause your code to function undesirably, if executions are overlapping.

The problem would be, in this case, that the handler executes and displays the MessageBox which in turn halts execution of the current scope until the the prompt is acknowledged by the user, meanwhile the handler has started again, showing another prompt, and another, and so on. At this point, we have multiple MessageBoxes waiting for input, yet counter hasn't even been incremented once. When we click 'OK' on the prompt, counter increments as desired, but at this point has a value of 1, rather than a value representing the number of prompts shown. This means yet another prompt will be displayed if more time elapses, until the user clicks 'OK' on at least 10 prompts.

You could try inhibiting execution if the process is already under way in order to prevent concurrent runs:

private readonly ReaderWriterLockSlim Locker = new ReaderWriterLockSlim();

int counter = 0;
private void timer1_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e) 
{
    if (Locker.TryEnterWriteLock(0))
    {
        try
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Hello");
            Counter++;
            if (Counter == 10)
            {
                Timer.Enabled = false;
            }
        }
        catch { }
        finally
        {
            Locker.ExitWriteLock();
        }
    }
}
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