Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

How can I turn this tree structure

[1, [2, [3, 4]], [5, [6, [7], 8]]]

1
   2
      3
      4
   5
      6
         7
      8

.... into this "reversed tree" structure, which basically contains the paths from all the leaf nodes to 1 (the root):

[8, [5, [1]], 7, [6, [5, [1]]], 4, [2, [1]], 3, [2, [1]]]

8
   5
      1
7
   6
      5
         1
4
   2
      1
3
   2
      1

The result wouldn’t even have to be structured as a tree, four flat arrays in the correct order would also be fine.

It looks like Depth-first search might be a relevant algorithm, but I can’t understand the pseudocode (what does incidentEdges() return?), so I’m pretty stuck.

If someone could offer a Ruby method (or really easy to understand pseudocode) to convert the original nested array into the result array, I would be infinitely grateful.

And this is not a homework assignment, rather it is the result of it being too long since I’ve studied... I need this to print a dependency tree in the proper order for a given issue in an issue tracker.

share|improve this question
    
I think the trick is in converting the array to a tree and then run DFS. I'll try to put up some code – Augusto Mar 10 '11 at 13:54
    
How come that 3 and 4 are on the same level but 5 and 8 aren't? – Mladen Jablanović Mar 10 '11 at 14:45
    
@mladen-jablanovic: Sorry, that was a bug in the first array, fixed now. I typed them in manually... Thanks! – stiang Mar 10 '11 at 14:51
    
Shouldn't it look [1, [2, [3, 4]], [5, [6, [7]], 8]]? – tokland Mar 10 '11 at 21:00
    
Or maybe: [1, [[2, [3, 4]], [5, [6, [7]], 8]]]. I think are you having problems finding working code because the way the data-structure defines the hierarchy is very weird (IMHO) – tokland Mar 10 '11 at 21:06
up vote 1 down vote accepted

A bit more compact code:

tree = [1, [2, [3, 4]], [5, [6, [7], 8]]]

def find_reverse_leaf_paths(nodes, prefix = [], paths = []) 
  leafs = []
  nodes.each do |node|
    if node.is_a?(Numeric)
      leafs.push(node)
    else
      prefix.push(leafs.pop) unless leafs.empty?
      leafs.clear
      find_reverse_leaf_paths(node, prefix, paths)
    end 
  end 
  leafs.each do |leaf|
    paths.push(prefix + [leaf])
  end 
  prefix.pop unless leafs.empty?
  paths.map { |path| path.reverse }.reverse
end

puts find_reverse_leaf_paths(tree).inspect
share|improve this answer
    
Compact and clean, and it returns an array as requested. Thanks! – stiang Mar 11 '11 at 12:19

You can use this code. It's not my best code, but I'm learning ruby too :D (it was a good exercise)

a = [1, [2, [3, 4]], [5, [6, [7], 8]]]

class Node
  attr_reader :value
  attr_reader :parent
  attr_reader :children

  def initialize(value, parent)
    @value = value
    @parent = parent
    @parent.add_child self unless parent == nil
    @children = []
  end

  def add_child(child)
    @children << child
  end

  def print_node(ident) 
    Range.new(0,ident).each {print ' '}
    print @value.to_s
    print "\n"
    children.each { |child| child.print_node (ident+4) }
  end

end

class Tree
  def self.from_array(array)
    process array, nil
  end


  def self.process(array, parent)
    node = nil
    array.each do |array_item| 
      if array_item.is_a? Numeric
        node = Node.new(array_item, parent) 
      else
        process(array_item, node)
      end
    end

    node
  end

  def self.print_paths_to_root node
    if node.children.empty? 
      puts print_path_to_root(node)
    else
      node.children.each do |child|
        print_paths_to_root child
      end  
    end
  end

  def self.print_path_to_root node 
    if node != nil
      node.value.to_s + '  ' + print_path_to_root(node.parent) 
    else
      ""
    end
  end
end

puts 'TREE'
root = Tree.from_array a
root.print_node 0

puts "\n\n\n"

puts 'PATH TO ROOT'
Tree.print_paths_to_root root
share|improve this answer
    
This looks very promising! And it works exactly as requested for the original array. However, for this array ([2, [4, 8, [15, [49]]], 16]), it only prints the 16. If I remove the 16, it prints everything OK. Any ideas on how to fix that? Anyway, thanks a lot - great job! – stiang Mar 10 '11 at 18:57
    
Err, forget my latest comment. There should of course be a common root in the array I posted. Everything is fine, in other words :) – stiang Mar 10 '11 at 19:09
    
The code is a bit brittle (I'm been very kind to myself here), as you mentioned the validation for "only" one root node, is just not there :(. – Augusto Mar 10 '11 at 19:12

Just thinking off the top of my head, why not recusively traverse the tree progressively concatenating the nodes, and when you reach a leaf output the nodes in reverse order. This should give you the 4 flat arrays you wanted.

your first 2 leaf-arrays would evolve like this:

1 - node 
12 - node
123 - leaf - output 321.
12 - pop out
124 - leaf - output 421

NWS

share|improve this answer
    
But how exactly would I do it? I am able to draw a tree using recursion, with proper indenting, but my brain fails me when I also need to keep track of the path. – stiang Mar 10 '11 at 15:20
    
you accumulate the path as you recurse. Record it as another parameter/argument. If it were a string think of it as appending a character each node and recursing with "12" + "3" as your argument. Therefore inside the recursive call your string looks like "123" – NWS Mar 10 '11 at 20:54

To clarify the point I was trying to make in my previous comments to the question, I'll show some code. I use just an Array as tree, so the empty Tree must [root, []] (hence the guard for empty children).

class Array
  def paths
    root, children = self
    return [root] if children.empty? 
    children.map do |child|
      (child.is_a?(Array) ? child.paths : [[child]]).map do |tail|
        [root] + tail
      end
    end.flatten(1)
  end
end

tree = [1, [[2, [3, 4]], [5, [[6, [7]], 8]]]]
p tree.paths
# [[1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 4], [1, 5, 6, 7], [1, 5, 8]]

Granted, this is neither the input you had nor the the result you wanted ;-) but it's the same idea, isn't it? My point is that if the data structure is "logic", the code should be pretty straighforward (and functional, to walk a tree we shouldn't need an imperative algorithm!).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.