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Given the following HTML:

<div id="container">
  <!-- Other elements here -->
  <div id="copyright">
    Copyright Foo web designs
  </div>
</div>

I would like #copyright to stick to the bottom of #container.

Can I achieve this without using absolute positioning? If the float property supported a value of 'bottom' it seems that would do the trick, but unfortunately, it doesn't.

share|improve this question
125  
This situation is one of the reasons why layout tables are not yet gone. Doing this with a table is dead simple and works everywhere. Doing this in CSS is hilariously difficult and cross-browser support is so-so. Let alone that it is impossible to remember how to do it right. –  Tomalak Feb 8 '09 at 17:45
3  
Why do you need to do it without absolute positioning? –  j-man86 Aug 30 '10 at 5:44
1  
Great answer from @User. It is not that difficult but you dont know @Tomalak. There is a lots of things table can't do. –  CallMeLaNN Mar 9 '11 at 9:59
5  
@Tomalak, how do you go about doing this with a table? –  Icode4food Sep 30 '11 at 16:49
2  
try my answer @Tomalak I think you'll be surprised at the simplicity (over tables) –  Hashbrown Oct 1 '13 at 7:21

17 Answers 17

up vote 480 down vote accepted

Likely not.

Assign position:relative to #container, and then position:absolute; bottom:0; to #copyright.

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7  
Yeah, just remember need position:relative in parent node to make the current parent:absolute still relative to the parent. –  CallMeLaNN Mar 9 '11 at 10:00
2  
how to center the copyright? text-align:center on either #container or #copyright doesn't seem to work –  morpheus May 9 '11 at 1:49
4  
If position:relative on your container breaks your design, remember that you can just include a wrapper div inside of the container with 100% height, and add position:relative to that instead. –  Jack Shepherd Aug 17 '11 at 17:16
73  
Wow, 130 votes for an answer that, in practice has severe issues, especially with something like a page footer as seems the OP's requirement. Read Rick Reilly' answer for details. The problem is the absolute element does not participate in page flow anymore. –  Stijn de Witt Feb 21 '12 at 15:46
3  
An absolutely positioned element seeks it's closest parent that is absolute or relatively position in order to determine it's position. If all fails it resorts to body (window). So hence the need for the parent to be relative. –  user17753 Jun 13 '12 at 18:46

Actually, the accepted answer by @User will only work if the window is tall and the content is short. But if the content is tall and the window is short, it will put the copyright info over the page content, and then scrolling down to see the content will leave you with a floating copyright notice. That makes this solution useless for most pages (like this page, actually).

The most common way of doing this is the "CSS sticky footer" approach demonstrated here, or a slightly slimmer variation here. This approach works great -- IF you have a fixed height footer.

If you need a variable height footer that will appear at the bottom of the window if the content is too short, and at the bottom of the content if the window is too short, what do you do?

Swallow your pride and use a table.

For example:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
  <style>
    * { padding:0; margin:0; }
    html, body { height:100%; }
    #container { height:100%; border-collapse:collapse; }
  </style>
</head>
<body>
<table id="container">
<tr>
<td valign="top">
  <div id="main">Lorem ipsum, etc.</div>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="bottom">
  <div id="footer">Copyright some evil company...</div>
</td>
</tr>
</table>
</body>
</html>

Try it out. This will work for any window size, for any amount of content, for any size footer, on every browser... even IE6.

If you're cringing at the thought of using a table for layout, take a second to ask yourself why. CSS was supposed to make our lives easier -- and it has, overall -- but the fact is that even after all these years, it's still a broken, counter-intuitive mess. It can't solve every problem. It's incomplete.

Tables aren't cool, but at least for now, they are sometimes the best way to solve a design problem.

share|improve this answer
38  
Seems like the best answer to me. In addition, you can always use "css tables" (display: table[-row/-cell]) instead of html tables. That provides the same layout without the semantics. –  chiccodoro Apr 19 '12 at 15:45
11  
+1 for pragmatism :) –  Steve Wilkes Oct 1 '12 at 9:26
23  
"Swallow your pride and use a table" bravo –  Kevin Apr 17 '13 at 16:34
2  
For others reading these comments: this has nothing to do with "pride" or being "cool". Using tables for layout is pragmatically even more painful especially for large amounts of content. Making sure you don't miss a td and sifting through so much irrelevant markup when adding content is hell. It's a pain cause we are creating HTML documents not just layouts, and if most of the content of our document isn't tabular data, then why are we putting it in tables? If we don't like using web technologies the way they were meant, then why use them? Use desktop/mobile apps to publish content instead –  gabe Aug 21 '13 at 22:31
14  
Pride is irrelevant. Tables shouldn't be used for layout, due to accessibility reasons. If you've ever used a screen reader, you'll know why tables should be used for tabular data only. Use css tables as @chiccodoro states. –  Matt Fellows Nov 7 '13 at 9:55

Yes you can do this without absolute positioning and without using tables (which screw with markup and such).

DEMO
This is tested to work on IE>7, chrome, FF & is a really easy thing to add to your existing layout.

<div id="container">
    Some content you don't want affected by the "bottom floating" div
    <div>supports not just text</div>

    <div class="foot">
        Some other content you want kept to the bottom
        <div>this is in a div</div>
    </div>
</div>
#container {
    height:100%;
    border-collapse:collapse;
    display : table;
}

.foot {
    display : table-row;
    vertical-align : bottom;
    height : 1px;
}

It effectively does what float:bottom would, even accounting for the issue pointed out in @Rick Reilly's answer!

share|improve this answer
1  
Nice! Just a note, IIRC you need the <!DOCTYPE> set in order for this to work on IE (<= 8 at least); those older versions only support display:table-XXX in "standards" mode. But standards mode will also break a lot of pages that were designed for, say, IE6. –  David Feb 25 at 12:54
    
This just solved a ton of issues I have been having! Thank you so much; my project now works perfectly. –  Ilmiont Jul 29 at 18:08
1  
I added &nbsp; instead content... –  Michael Phelps Oct 12 at 6:43

Try this;

<div id="container">
  <div style="height: 100%; border:1px solid #ff0000;">
  <!-- Other elements here -->
</div>
<div id="copyright" style="position:relative;border:1px solid #00ff00;top:-25px">
   Copyright Foo web designs
</div>

share|improve this answer

Its an old question, but this is a unique approach that can help in several cases.

Pure CSS, Without Absolute positioning, Without Fixing any Height, Cross-Browser (IE9+)

check out that Working Fiddle

Because normal flow is 'top-to-bottom' we can't simply ask the #copyright div to stick to the bottom of his parent without absolutely positioning of some sort, But if we wanted the #copyright div to stick to the top of his parent, it will be very simple - because this is the normal flow way.

So we will use this in our advantage. we will change the order of the divs in the HTML, now the #copyright div is at the top, and the content follow it right away. we also make the content div stretch all the way (using pseudo elements and clearing techniques)

now it's just a matter of inverting that order back in the view. that can be easily done with CSS transform.

We rotate the container by 180deg, and now: up-is-down. (and we inverse back the content to look normal again)

If we want to have a scroolbar within the content area, we need to apply a little bit more of CSS magic. as can be showed Here [in that example, the content is below a header - but its the same idea]

HTML: (notice the little changes)

<div id="Container">
    <div id="Copyright">
        Copyright Foo web designs
    </div>
    <div id="Stretch">
      <!-- Other elements here -->
        <div>Element 1</div>
        <div>Element 2</div>
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

*
{
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
}
html, body, #Container
{
    height: 100%;
    color: white;
}

#Container:before
{
    content: '';
    height: 100%;
    float: left;
}
#Copyright
{
    background-color: green;
}

#Stretch
{
    background-color: blue;
}
#Stretch:after
{
    content: '';
    display: block;
    clear: both;    
}

#Container, #Container > div
{
    -moz-transform: rotateX(180deg);
    -ms-transform: rotateX(180deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(180deg);
    -webkit-transform: rotateX(180deg);
    transform: rotateX(180deg);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I used the same approach! I guess great minds think alike! jsfiddle.net/3Myn2/224 –  JDuarteDJ Jul 11 at 13:33

If you want it to "stick" to the bottom, regardless of the height of container, then absolute positioning is the way to go. Of course, if the copyright element is the last in the container it'll always be at the bottom anyway.

Can you expand on your question? Explain exactly what you're trying to do (and why you don't want to use absolute positioning)?

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Create another container div for the elements above #copyright. Just above copyright add a new div: <div style="clear:both;"></div> It will force the footer to be under everything else, just like in the case of using relative positioning (bottom:0px;).

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You can indeed align the box to the bottom without using position:absolute if you know the height of the #container using the text alignment feature of inline-block elements.

Here you can see it in action.

This is the code:

#container {
    /* So the #container most have a fixed height */
    height: 300px;
    line-height: 300px;
    background:Red;
}

#container > * {
    /* Restore Line height to Normal */
    line-height: 1.2em;
}

#copyright {
    display:inline-block;
    vertical-align:bottom;
    width:100%; /* Let it be a block */
    background:green;
}
share|improve this answer

Also, if there's stipulations with using position:absolute; or position:relative;, you can always try padding parent div or putting a margin-top:x;. Not a very good method in most cases, but it may come in handy in some cases.

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Link here.

HTML:

<div class="overlay">
    <div class="container">
        <div class="height">
          content
        </div>
    </div>

    <div class="footer">
        footer
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

html, body {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
}

.overlay {
    min-height: 100%;
    position: relative;
}

.container {
    width: 900px;
    position: relative;
    padding-bottom: 50px;
}

.height {
    width: 900px;
    height: 50px;
}

.footer {
    width: 900px;
    height: 50px;
    position: absolute;
    bottom: 0;
}
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Here is an approach targeted at making an element with a known height and width (at least approximately) float to the right and stay at the bottom, while behaving as an inline element to the other elements. It is focused at the bottom-right because you can place it easily in any other corner through other methods.

I needed to make a navigation bar which would have the actual links at the bottom right, and random sibling elements, while ensuring that the bar itself stretched properly, without disrupting the layout. I used a "shadow" element to occupy the navigation bar's links' space and added it at the end of the container's child nodes.


<!DOCTYPE html>
<div id="container">
  <!-- Other elements here -->
  <div id="copyright">
    Copyright Foo web designs
  </div>
  <span id="copyright-s">filler</span>
</div>

<style>
  #copyright {
    display:inline-block;
    position:absolute;
    bottom:0;
    right:0;
  }
  #copyright-s {
    float:right;
    visibility:hidden;
    width:20em; /* ~ #copyright.style.width */
    height:3em; /* ~ #copyright.style.height */
  }
</style>
share|improve this answer

If you do not know the height of child block:

    #parent{background:green;width:200px;height:200px;display:table-cell;vertical-align:bottom;}
    .child{background:red;vertical-align:bottom;}

  </style>
</head>
<body>

<div id="parent">
  <div class="child">child
  </div> 
  </div>

http://jsbin.com/ULUXIFon/3/edit

If you know the height of the child block add the child block then add padding-top/margin-top :

    #parent{background:green;width:200px;height:130px;padding-top:70px;}
    .child{background:red;vertical-align:bottom;height:130px;}

<div id="parent">
  <div class="child">child
  </div> 
  </div>  
share|improve this answer

Maybe this helps someone: You can always place the div outside the other div and then push it upwards using negative margin:

<div id="container" style="background-color: #ccc; padding-bottom: 30px;">
  Hello!
</div>
<div id="copyright" style="margin-top: -20px;">
  Copyright Foo web designs
</div>
share|improve this answer

While none of the answers provided here seemed to apply or work in my particular case, I came across this article which provides this neat solution :

#container {
  display: table;
}

#copyright {
  display: table-footer-group;
}

I find it very useful for applying responsive design for mobile display without having to reorder all the html code of a website, setting body itself as a table.

Note that only the first table-footer-group or table-header-group will be rendered as such : if there are more than one, the others will be rendered as table-row-group.

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Div of style, position:absolute;bottom:5px;width:100%; is working, But it required more scrollup situation.

window.onscroll = function() {
    var v = document.getElementById("copyright");
    v.style.position = "fixed";
    v.style.bottom = "5px";
}
share|improve this answer
1  
-1 for using JavaScript to apply static CSS. –  Gajus Kuizinas Jan 14 at 22:55

Just because this hasn't been mentioned at all, what usually works well in situations like yours:

Placing the copyright-div after the container-div

You would only have to format the copyright-div in a similar way to the other container (same overall width, centering, etc.), and all is fine.

CSS:

#container, #copyright {
    width: 1000px;
    margin:0 auto;
}

HTML:

<div id="container">
    <!-- Other elements here -->
</div>

<div id="copyright">
    Copyright Foo web designs
</div>

The only time this might not be ideal is when your container-div is declared with height:100%, and the user would need to scroll down to see the copyright. But even still you could work around (e.g. margin-top:-20px - when the height of your copyright element is 20px).

  • No absolute positioning
  • No table layout
  • No crazy css, that looks different in every other browser (well IE at least, you know)
  • Simple and clear formatting

Aside: I know the OP asked for a solution that "... sticks to the bottom of the 'container' div ...", and not something under it, but come on, people are looking for good solutions here, and this is one!

share|improve this answer
    
In OP's case, this solution is only good if #copyright is fixed-height (then you could set margin-top: -{element height}. –  Gajus Kuizinas Jan 14 at 22:54
    
@Gajus: This is not absolute nor fixed positioning. This does exactly what the OP wants (no matter of copyright-height), with the only exception that the copyright-div is not IN the first container. The OP asked for copyright to stick at the bottom of the container, not the page!! –  Levit Jan 17 at 8:37
    
Sorry, I mean't if #container's container is fixed height. –  Gajus Kuizinas Jan 17 at 9:06
    
Unless I am mistaken myself, the real issue that OP is trying to solve is bottom of the element when element height is dictated by another element, eg with comments jsbin.com/acoVevI/3. Here you cannot simply put button outside of the container. To further illustrate the issue see jsbin.com/acoVevI/4. –  Gajus Kuizinas Jan 17 at 9:33
    
The OP said: "I would like #copyright to stick to the bottom of #container.", so this is not totally clear from the question. Moreover this is a valid example for any case where it simply should "stick to the bottom of #container". This solution should be helpful, has a clean approach and works well for many layouts. E.g. any page with scrolling content, like stackoverflow.com ;-) –  Levit Feb 17 at 14:42

There is nothing called float:bottom in CSS. The best way is using positioning in such cases:

position:absolute;
bottom:0;
share|improve this answer
    
For one thing this doesn't flow, no text wrap around it... –  ErikE Oct 4 '13 at 0:10

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