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I like the using(){} statement for its control of scope and for readability. Not only can you create objects, use them and dispose them neatly, but you can also use it like this:

Suppose myInstance is an instance of MyClass from some other place in code - ie a method parameter or something

using (var t = myInstance) {
    t.Foo= "Hello";
    t.Bar= "World";
    ...
}

Definition of MyClass:

public class MyClass : IDisposable
{
   public string Foo {get; set;}
   public string Bar {get; set;}
   ...

   public void Dispose() {}
}

This makes code neater and more readable (I feel) and certainly easier to type. However in order to use this widely you have to implement IDisposable. In this case there's no need for MyClass actually handle anything in Dispose, so its empty.

My question is, is there any drawback to using IDisposable in this way?

I appreciate that there are similar questions already on SO, but I don't think these deal with using IDispose for this purpose (or they refer to specific classes).

EDIT:

OK, so I guess I was being a bit specifc, but there's a wider point here. The using statement is a handy, very neat way to define an instance for a specific length of time, and then you can forget about it. Its seems unfair that this ability should be restricted to IDisposable objects only. Yes there's a certain amount of laziness in not just instancing and then setting to null, but the using block makes it very specific what the instance's scope is. Why shouldn't I be allowed to do it with non IDisposable classes?

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1  
what makes you think this is more readable? IMHO less fluffy code is. More useless code isn't. –  Caspar Kleijne Mar 10 '11 at 13:54
    
I guess its my part VB.Net background - I'm used to the With block meaning that its easier to see properties being used without the spam of the instance name up front getting in the way. –  Jon Egerton Mar 10 '11 at 13:57

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When you implement IDisposable you're advertising that your class is special and needs to be disposed off properly. Not only with inline code like that but also when classes hold references to your class. They'll also need to implement IDisposable in order to dispose of your instance. That creates an artificial requirement on the users of your class.

You can use a scope to achieve what you want:

{
  var _ = instance;
  _.Foo = "Hello"; 
  _.Bar = "World"; 
}

Another option is this:

instance.With(_ => {
  _.Foo = "Hello";
  _.Bar = "World"; 
});

...

public static class WithExtensions {
  public static void With<T>(this T instance, Action<T> action) {
    action(instance);
  }
}

This one is better because what's going on is more explicit.

I also see the pain that you have. It'd be better if we could define our own control blocks (like in Nemerle). Although C# doesn't allow that kind of customization, you shouldn't abuse the specific using statement to achieve what you want. You can use lambdas to do that, much in the way I've shown with the With extension method. In fact, that's how some parallel "constructs" were done in the Task Parallel Library.

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1  
+1 - That about covers it! - I'd read about the extension strategy, but didn't know about the scoping. And I take your point about reuse and forcing work on consumers of the class. –  Jon Egerton Mar 10 '11 at 14:45

I wouldn't (ab)use using just to limit the scope of variables within a method unless these types really need to be disposed - it may just confuse people. In the case of your example it sounds more like you want to add an additional method to structure your code better (and probably get the same readability benefit) :

public void WorkWithMyInstance(MyInstance t)
{
  t.Foo= "Hello";
  t.Bar= "World";
  ...
}
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In the case of a setup method that sets up a number of different instances this would lead to lots of "WorkWith..." methods –  Jon Egerton Mar 10 '11 at 13:57

If your class doesn't need to be disposed, there's no point in using using.

Instead, you can make a normal block:

{ var t = myInstance;
    t.Foo= "Hello";
    t.Bar= "World";
    ...
}

However, I fail to see the purpose.

From a design perspective, you should not implement IDisposable unnecessarily.
Implementing IDisposable tells people who use your class that it uses expensive resources and must be disposed when finished with.
If that's not actually true, you're just making their job harder.

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You're not really using the interface as it was intended. Per the documentation:

The primary use of this interface is to release unmanaged resources.

If you're just using IDisposable so you can wrap it in a using statement, I think that gives the wrong impression to users of your classes. They may interpret this code as doing much more than what it really is doing.

I think the unintended consequence will be confusion.

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1  
The fundamental question is whether the class has, or future versions or derivations may have, a need to perform any cleanup actions before instances are abandoned. A class which implements IDisposable conveys the message "Anyone who creates an instance of this type should ensure that IDisposable.Dispose gets called on that instance before it is abandoned." If nothing's going to care when instances of a class or its descendants get abandoned, there's no reason to burden users of the class with that responsibility. –  supercat Mar 11 '11 at 16:15
    
@supercat - exactly. That was the point I was trying to make. A user of the class sees that it implements IDisposable, so there's the assumption that there's some unmanaged resource being handled by the class. If you're not (and don't plan to as you mentioned), then it's misleading and confusing. –  David Hoerster Mar 11 '11 at 16:29

Yes, the using block is syntactic sugar for a try/finally block.

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3  
with a Dispose() in "finally" :) –  Janus Tøndering Mar 10 '11 at 14:00
    
This doesn't answer the question at all. –  SLaks Mar 10 '11 at 14:10

You can use this one also right?

var myclass = new MyClass
{
MyProperty1 = "Property1",
MyProperty2 = "Property2",
};
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And I do - lots, but that's only relevant where myclass is a new instance. –  Jon Egerton Mar 10 '11 at 13:59
    
@Jon Egerton : Yes it only work with new instance –  Anuraj Mar 10 '11 at 14:08

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