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I have been a follower for a long time but this is the first time I ask a question. In a nutshell, the issue is; vector<Student*> studentvector that is a vector of object pointers seems to push the student info back as student ; but when I print to see the first one in vector whether it performs as intended, I see it always updates the first record with new coming student info although there is no problem on studentvector.size() It pushes the record back to the vector as many as how many time I call addStudent(...) but it fills all vector with the information of last student. What may be done to succeed in filling vector with correct info within this frame, without using smart pointers or advanced stuff?

Sorry if I am vague on my question. You may lead me to provide what is also necessary to understand the problem. Thanks in advance.

addStudent(const string alias, const string name) throw(StudentException)
{
Student* student = new Student(alias, name)
studentvector.push_back(student);
cout << studentvector.front() << endl;
}

That is the implementation of Student;

#include "Student.h"

string *Alias;
string *Name;


Student::Student(string alias)
{
    Alias = new string(alias);
}

Student::Student(string alias, string name)
{
    Alias = new string(alias);
    Name = new string(name);
}

Student::~Student()
{
    delete Alias;
    delete Name;
}

const string& Student::getAlias() const
{
    return *Alias;
}

void Student::setAlias(const string& alias)
{
    *Alias = alias;
}

const string& Student::getName() const
{
    return *Name;
}

void Student::setName(const string& name)
{
    *Name = name;
}

Consider alias is not reserved.

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4  
Show us the Student class –  Erik Mar 10 '11 at 14:18
1  
Can you add an example of how you are accessing studentvector? –  fnokke Mar 10 '11 at 14:20
1  
1) don't use exception specifications 2) learn to use a debugger –  Alexandre C. Mar 10 '11 at 14:22
    
I am certain the code as you wrote it above is correct and will not cause the problem you describe. There are however many other places that could, like the Student class, the operator<<(std::ostream&, const Student *) (or are you really printing just the addresses as the code above will in absence of that operator), the way studentvector is declared and I probably forgot some. You'll need to provide more context to get more diagnosis. –  Jan Hudec Mar 10 '11 at 14:36
    
(Note to future readers: Many of the answers and comments here were written before afu kindly supplied the code that implements Student, which is where the problem actually was. That is why they fail to address the actual problem.) –  Gareth McCaughan Mar 10 '11 at 16:21

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Doh! Here's your problem - all objects from type Student use the same global pointers:

string *Alias;
string *Name;

Make these two as members in you class


class Student
{
private:
    string *Alias;
    string *Name;
//..
}; 

EDIT: Also, I don't think, that it's a good idea to use pointer to std::string, I'd suggest you to use like this:

class Student
{
private:
    string Alias;
    string Name;
//..
}; 
share|improve this answer
    
Members are not stack objects. They occupy memory which is part of their complete object's memory. –  aschepler Mar 10 '11 at 14:46
    
Yep, stupid mistake. 10x –  Kiril Kirov Mar 10 '11 at 14:55
    
Thanks it works; but without changing class privates in my Student header file, how could I do the same job? –  vuvu Mar 10 '11 at 14:58
    
@afu: why would you want to do that? –  larsmans Mar 10 '11 at 15:05
    
@afu - sorry, I don't understand what you mean? P.S. I'm curious how you decide which answer to accept (: –  Kiril Kirov Mar 10 '11 at 15:21

Your Student.cpp defines a single global pointer Alias and a single pointer Name. What you really want is a separate Alias and Name for each Student object. You do this by adding members to the class:

class Student {
public:
  Student(const std::string& a, const std::string& n);
  //...
private:
  std::string Alias;
  std::string Name;
};

Student::Student(const std::string& a, const std::string& n)
  : Alias(a), Name(n)
{}
share|improve this answer

I may be delirious here, but are you not specifically printing out front, while pushing back?

studentvector.push_back(student);
cout << studentvector.front() << endl;

You're pushing onto the back, not the front, then printing what's in front. Of course you're not seeing front changing. You need to print back or push front. If push front isn't available, you can use insert(container.begin(), object).

You also need to move those global string variables into the class as members, so that for each instance of Student, the student has instances of Name and Alias.

Another note... you're dynamically allocating a string class. The purpose of the string class is to handle the dynamic memory of a char* string for you. There's no reason for you to use string*s in this situation, as far as I can tell from your code. string will handle the new and delete internally for you.

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2  
No, studentvector.back(); would normally show what is the last in the vector. The problem is the changing of the studentvector[0] with upcoming student. –  vuvu Mar 10 '11 at 14:39

I agree with what everyone else has said. However, I can't reproduce the problem you say you're having. In particular, the following (rather icky) code correctly outputs two lines saying "Student(foo,bar)".

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>

// NOTE WELL: many things in this code are bad style and should not be imitated.
// One of them is the namespace-polluting using-directive below:
using namespace std;

struct Student {
  string alias, name;
  Student(string a, string n) : alias(a), name(n) {}
};
class StudentException : public exception {};

vector<Student*> studentvector;

ostream& operator<<(ostream& stream, Student* student) {
  stream << "Student(" << student->alias << "," << student->name << ")";
  return stream;
}

void addStudent(const string alias, const string name) throw(StudentException)
{
  Student* student = new Student(alias, name);
  studentvector.push_back(student);
  cout << studentvector.front() << endl;
}

int main(void) {
  addStudent("foo","bar");
  addStudent("baz","quux");
}

It might be helpful to know how your (not-working) code diverges from the above.

A couple of remarks that conceivably might be relevant:

  1. You aren't by any chance confusing the front and back ends of the vector somehow?
  2. If (unlike your addStudent function) your actual code has a single Student object, and is modifying it and then pushing a pointer to it onto your vector, then of course you'll get the kind of wrong results you describe, because it'll be the same pointer every time.
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1  
Please don't use using namespace std;, especially when writing examples for beginners. They will pick it up! –  Björn Pollex Mar 10 '11 at 14:36
    
That's part of what I meant by "rather icky", and it looks as if the particular beginner in question is probably doing it already! But, for the benefit of posterity, be it noted: It is almost always a Bad Thing to say using namespace std in C++ (or to do similar things in other languages, such as import * from some_module in Python), and you should not be fooled into thinking otherwise just because lazy people like me do it in toy examples. -- And now I'm going to add a comment to my icky code saying the same. –  Gareth McCaughan Mar 10 '11 at 16:10

std::vector::front() will return you the reference to the first element in the vector. If you want to remove element, you need to call pop_back() which will return the element and remove from the vector.

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If you have Boost then check out Boost Pointer Containers.

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