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My html contains a series of nested divs, each having the same class ("shell") but a unique id.

<div class="shell s01" id="blah">
    <!-- s01 content -->
    <div class="shell s02" id="bar">
        <!-- s02 content -->
        <div class="shell s03" id="wah">
            <!-- s03 content -->
        </div>

        <div class="shell s03" id="foo">
            <!-- s03 content -->
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

I want the border color of a div to change when the mouse enters it, but it should return to its original color when the mouse enters a child div. The jQuery code below changes the border color to blue, but does not return parent div borders to the original color (#8E8DA2) as the mouse enters a child div. Instead, when mousing over an inner div, it and all its ancestors are highlighted. For example, if hovering over "wah" then "blah" and "bar" are highlighted too. I want "blah" and "bar" to revert to the original border color.

I understand that when the mouse is over a child it is over the child's parent as well. But I'm not sure why the 'parent' statement below does not solve the problem.

$('.shell').mouseover(function() {
    $(this).parent('.shell').css('border-color', '#8E8DA2');
    $(this).css('border-color', '#0000FF');
});

$('.shell').mouseout(function() {
    $(this).css('border-color', '#8E8DA2');
});

Any ideas? Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

Thanks guys--sorry I don't have enough of a rep yet to vote up answers.

I found a working solution in this other stackoverflow question. The key was to invoke the stopPropagation() method on the mouseover event.

$('.shell').mouseover(function(e) {
    e.stopPropagation();
    $(this).css('border-color', '#0000FF');
})

$('.shell').mouseout(function() {
    $(this).css('border-color', '#8E8DA2');
});
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You should have enough now. –  jjnguy Mar 10 '11 at 19:40
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One option would to be to store the cell's current border color in a variable and then reset it once the mouse leaves the cell.

From your code above, it appears as if the color to which you want to return it is consistent so you can probably just store it in its own variable.

You can refactor your code a little bit and do something like this:

var sOriginalColor = '#8E8DA2';
$('.shell')
 .mouseover(function(evt) {
    evt.preventDefault(); // specified for purposes of example mentioned in the comments
    $(this).parent('.shell').css('border-color', sOriginalColor);
    $(this).css('border-color', '#0000FF');
 })
 .mouseout(function() {
    $(this).parent('.shell').css('border-color', sOriginalColor);
    $(this).css('border-color', sOriginalColor);
 });

Admittedly, I ran your code but I'm not completely sure that the solution I've provided is what you're looking for because there is some behavior happening related to event bubbling.

If that's what you're experiencing, then reading the quirks mode article on events may help you pinpoint what's up.

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Thanks very much! After checking out the article you linked, I found this older article on stackoverflow that had a working solution. Now I need to read about about the stopPropagation method to understand why it works. –  Fred Mars Mar 10 '11 at 15:29
    
@Fred Mars you can easily stop propagation within event handlers in jQuery. In the functions, such specify the e argument and then call e.preventDefault(). I've updated my answer just as an example. –  Tom Mar 10 '11 at 15:54
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This should do the trick

$('.shell').mouseenter(function() {
    $(this).parent('.shell').css('border-color', '#8e8da2');
    $(this).css('border-color', '#00f');
});

$('.shell').mouseleave(function() {
    $(this).parent('.shell').css('border-color', '#00f');
    $(this).css('border-color', '#8e8da2');
});

So first of all, you need to use mouseenter and mouseleave, because they don't bubble up, only the specific element they're attached to gets the event. Also, on leave, you need to give the parent back the "highlight" colour, because when you leave a child you end up in the parent, naturally. Without that, the parent will stay default colour because the mouseenter doesn't fire in that case - seems that leaving the child doesn't fire the enter of the parent, so you kinda have to do it manually.

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