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I have this code:

$people=array();
$i=0;
foreach ($xml->xpath('//person') as $character) {
if ($character->status!="Active"){

  $people[$i]['fullname']=(string)$character->fullname;
  $people[$i]['status']=(string)$character->status;
  $i++;

    }
}

It creates an array with numeric keys, based on the value of $i. However, I don't actually want that, I want the "fullname" string to be the key but I can't work out how to dynamically assign the key. I was trying things like:

$people[(string)$character->fullname]=>(string)$character->status;

but this just throws errors. I can't work out how to create keys based on variables. Can anyone help, please?

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What errors does it throw? It certainly looks like it should work. You don't even need the (string) casts. –  Jon Mar 10 '11 at 15:13
    
Does it have to be converted to a string? –  Kavi Siegel Mar 10 '11 at 15:15
    
Doh. As the answers below say, you need to change => to =. –  Jon Mar 10 '11 at 15:17
    
Thank you everyone, I now have it working, thanks for your help. –  Max Mar 10 '11 at 15:35
    
I see you're a new user here. Welcome! You also may want to take a look at the faq as soon as you find the time. –  Alin Purcaru Mar 10 '11 at 15:43
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3 Answers

Try this again, but with =, not =>:

$people[ (string) $character->fullname ] = (string) $character->status;
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You only use => in the Array definition. Otherwise just use bog-standard assignment:

$people[$character->fullname] = $character->status;

You don't need the casts, as you already have strings. Even if you didn't, you could simply rely on the dynamic typing to convert them as needed on output.

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@Tomalak "Why are they not strings in the first place?" Because he's working with XML. They are nodes, but sometimes you need the node value, so you cast to string. –  Alin Purcaru Mar 10 '11 at 15:30
    
@Alin: You shouldn't ever have to use explicit casts in a dynamically typed language. The type can be inferred when he gets to use the array elements. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 10 '11 at 15:36
    
Alin - yes, I was having some weird issues when I tried to sort before specifically turning them to strings. –  Max Mar 10 '11 at 15:37
    
@Max: Ah, you didn't say anything about sorting! Add the casts back in then. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 10 '11 at 15:40
    
@Tomalak You can run in all sort of issues if you keep the full objects. You may run out of memory. Sorting may not work as expected. And one I encountered a lot of times is saving the information in the session, XML objects don't serialize. As for casting the objects used as the array index, that is redundant, but in coding a certain amount of redundancy increases readability. –  Alin Purcaru Mar 10 '11 at 15:41
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$people[$character->fullname] = (string)$character->status;
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