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I'm writing a function to be called by main which allocate memory to a few pointers declared in main. I learnt I can do this by using pointer to pointer or reference to pointer, but I'm having problem deallocating these memories in main. please help me with what is wrong in the following code:

1. using pointer to pointer:

void fun1(int **a, double **b, char **c)
{

    *a=new int[20];
    *b=new double[20];
    *c=new char[10];

    for (int i=0;i<20;i++){
        (*a)[i]=i;
        (*b)[i]=sqrt((double)((*a)[i]));
    }
    *c="0123456789";

}


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    int *a;
    double *b;
    char *c;

    fun1(&a,&b,&c);
    cout<<"a & b are:"<<endl;
    for(int i=0;i<20;i++)
        cout<<a[i]<<"\t"<<b[i]<<endl;
    cout<<"c is: "<<c<<endl;

    delete[] a;
    delete[] b;
    delete[] c;
    return 0;
}

2. using reference to pointer:

void fun1(int*& a, double*& b, char*& c)
{

    a=new int[20];
    b=new double[20];
    c=new char[10];

    for (int i=0;i<20;i++){
        a[i]=i;
        b[i]=sqrt((double)a[i]);
    }
    c="0123456789";

}


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    int *a;
    double *b;
    char *c;

    fun1(a,b,c);
    cout<<"a & b are:"<<endl;
    for(int i=0;i<20;i++)
        cout<<a[i]<<"\t"<<b[i]<<endl;
    cout<<"c is: "<<c<<endl;

    delete[] a;
    delete[] b;
    delete[] c;
    return 0;
}

thanks a lot!

share|improve this question
2  
What do you mean by "I'm having problem deallocating these memories" ? – log0 Mar 10 '11 at 15:18
2  
@Ugo: This sounds like the IT-version of post-traumatic stress syndrome. – Björn Pollex Mar 10 '11 at 15:20
    
What error do you get ? – FrankH. Mar 10 '11 at 15:21
    
side note: you're misusing std::endl by treating it simply as a newline. – justin Mar 10 '11 at 15:25
    
right, after googling it up I now know endl flushes the buffered stream which was there for efficiency in the first place. so using it in places "\n" is required is an overkill. thanks – string_is_hard Mar 10 '11 at 16:33

This in fun1()

*c="0123456789";

followed by this in main()

delete[] c;

is undefined behavior since you try to delete[] a string literal.

share|improve this answer
    
It's also an off-by-one error. – Brian Roach Mar 10 '11 at 15:23
    
@Brian Roach: Where's off-by-one here? – sharptooth Mar 10 '11 at 15:24
    
*c=new char[10]; *c="0123456789"; Where does the \0 go? – Brian Roach Mar 10 '11 at 15:26
    
@Brian Roach: The string literal is already null-terminated. It is not deep-copied here, instead the block returned by new[] is leaked. – sharptooth Mar 10 '11 at 15:28
    
Oh jesus. I need more coffee. No more SO until I'm awake, thanks. – Brian Roach Mar 10 '11 at 15:30

The problem has nothing to do with how you are passing the pointers, and everything to do with how you are initializing the contents of c. c ends up pointing to memory that was not created by new[] and so cannot be freed by delete[].

share|improve this answer
int *a;
double *b;
char *c;

fun1(a,b,c);

You meant:

int* a;
double* b;
char* c;

fun1(&a,&b,&c);

And then you're ok.

However, as sharptooth says, your delete[] c is broken because you just reassigned the pointer to a string literal instead of copying the chars.


Please, use std::vector and std::string instead of all this nonsense:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

void fun1(std::vector<int>& a, std::vector<double>& b, std::string& c)
{
    a.resize(20);
    b.resize(20);

    for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++) {
        a[i] = i;
        b[i] = sqrt((double)a[i]);
    }

    c = "0123456789";
}


int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    std::vector<int> a;
    std::vector<double> b;
    std::string c;

    fun1(a,b,c);

    std::cout << "a & b are: \n";
    for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++)
        std::cout << a[i] << "\t" << b[i] << " \n";

    std::cout << "c is: " << c << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks. I haven't learnt std::vector and std::string yet but I guess the char* or string type in C is not the recommended type in C++. – string_is_hard Mar 10 '11 at 15:52
    
@string_is_hard: That's right. Messing with pointers and buffers like this leads to errors and bugs. – Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 10 '11 at 16:06
    
I tried assigning "012456789" to string str, then use str.copy(c,10,0); and it works now. Thanks again. Think I'm gonna try learn C++ in a more systematical way rather than messing all the old C stuff along the way. – string_is_hard Mar 10 '11 at 16:13
    
@string_is_hard: I think that's a great idea. Good luck! – Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 10 '11 at 16:14

There is no "proper" way to do that, your program design is flawed. The very same code module that is allocating the dynamic memory shall be the same one that frees it. So if fun1() is located in fun.c, there should also be another function in fun.c called cleanup() or whatever, which cleans up the mess fun1() made. Otherwise your programs are soon turning into happy-memory-leak-land.

A better design in this case is to let main() allocate the memory, then pass the allocated buffers as parameter to the function.

This concept is known as "private encapsulation" in object-oriented programming.

share|improve this answer
    
I think this is more an exercise in curiosity on the OP's part than an actual design intended for a useful purpose ... or at least I hope that is the case ;) – AJG85 Mar 10 '11 at 15:35
    
Thanks. I know this method is not recommended because the memory allocating and deallocating is in different function making it difficult to maintain. Just trying out stuff. In fact I've had almost all my problems related to char * and string over the past a few days which I thought is some other problem. /flush – string_is_hard Mar 10 '11 at 15:54

What you are doing is a ticket for disaster. I strongly recommend using stl containers. It is usually recommended to use containers that handle deallocation for you, because deallocation is a frequent cause of annoying bugs. Try to avoid raw pointers, they are very rarely an advantage and make your life more complicated.

#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void fun1(vector<int>& a, vector<double>& b, string& c)
{
    size_t size = 20;
    a.resize(size);
    b.resize(size);
    for (int i=0;i<size;i++){
        a.at(i) = i;
        b.at(i) = sqrt(i); // auto conversion to double
    }
    c="0123456789";
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    vector<int> a;
    vector<double> b;
    string c;

    fun1(a,b,c);
    cout<<"a & b are:"<<endl;
    for(int i=0;i<a.size();i++)
        cout<<a.at(i)<<"\t"<<b.at(i)<<endl;
    cout<<"c is: "<<c<<endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you! I haven't gone that far in my learning of C++. Still a beginner with old C mindset. But I'll keep your suggestions in mind. – string_is_hard Mar 10 '11 at 16:10

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