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There are already a number of questions about text rendering in OpenGL, such as:

But mostly what is discussed is rendering textured quads using the fixed-function pipeline. Surely shaders must make a better way.

I'm not really concerned about internationalization, most of my strings will be plot tick labels (date and time or purely numeric). But the plots will be re-rendered at the screen refresh rate and there could be quite a bit of text (not more than a few thousand glyphs on-screen, but enough that hardware accelerated layout would be nice).

Are there any libraries for text-rendering using modern OpenGL? If not, what is the best approach?

  • Geometry shaders that accept e.g. position and orientation and a character sequence and emit textured quads
  • Geometry shaders that render vector fonts
  • As above, but using tessellation shaders instead
  • A compute shader to do font rasterization
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I'm not able to answer on state of the art, being primarily OpenGL ES oriented nowadays, but tessellating a TTF using the GLU tesselator and submitting it as geometry via the old fixed functionality pipeline with kerning calculated on CPU gave good visual results on anti-aliasing hardware and good performance across the board even almost a decade ago. So it's not just with shaders that you can find a 'better' way (depending on your criteria, of course). FreeType can spit out Bezier glyph boundaries and kerning information, so you can work live from a TTF at runtime. –  Tommy Mar 10 '11 at 16:59
    
QML2 (of Qt5) does some interesting tricks with OpenGL and distance fields when rendering text: blog.qt.digia.com/blog/2012/08/08/native-looking-text-in-qml-2 –  mlvljr Nov 10 '13 at 12:47
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6 Answers

up vote 94 down vote accepted

Rendering outlines, unless you render only a dozen characters total, remains a "no go" due to the number of vertices needed per character to approximate curvature. Though there have been approaches to evaluate bezier curves in the pixel shader instead, these suffer from not being easily antialiased, which is trivial using a distance-map-textured quad, and evaluating curves in the shader is still computionally much more expensive than necessary.

The best trade-off between "fast" and "quality" are still textured quads with a signed distance field texture. It is very slightly slower than using a plain normal textured quad, but not so much. The quality on the other hand, is in an entirely different ballpark. The results are truly stunning, it is as fast as you can get, and effects such as glow are trivially easy to add, too. Also, the technique can be downgraded nicely to older hardware, if needed.

See the famous Valve paper for the technique.

The technique is conceptually similar to how implicit surfaces (metaballs and such) work, though it does not generate polygons. It runs entirely in the pixel shader and takes the distance sampled from the texture as a distance function. Everything above a chosen threshold (usually 0.5) is "in", everything else is "out". In the simplest case, on 10 year old non-shader-capable hardware, setting the alpha test threshold to 0.5 will do that exact thing (though without special effects and antialiasing).
If one wants to add a little more weight to the font (faux bold), a slightly smaller threshold will do the trick without modifying a single line of code (just change your "font_weight" uniform). For a glow effect, one simply considers everything above one threshold as "in" and everything above another (smaller) threshold as "out, but in glow", and LERPs between the two. Antialiasing works similarly.

By using an 8-bit signed distance value rather than a single bit, this technique increases the effective resolution of your texture map 16-fold in each dimension (instead of black and white, all possible shades are used, thus we have 256 times the information using the same storage). But even if you magnify far beyond 16x, the result still looks quite acceptable. Long straight lines will eventually become a bit wiggly, but there will be no typical "blocky" sampling artefacts.

You can use a geometry shader for generating the quads out of points (reduce bus bandwidth), but honestly the gains are rather marginal. The same is true for instanced character rendering as described in GPG8. The overhead of instancing is only amortized if you have a lot of text to draw. The gains are, in my opinion, in no relation to the added complexity and non-downgradeability. Plus, you are either limited by the amount of constant registers, or you have to read from a texture buffer object, which is non-optimal for cache coherence (and the intent was to optimize to begin with!).
A simple, plain old vertex buffer is just as fast (possibly faster) if you schedule the upload a bit ahead in time and will run on every hardware built during the last 15 years. And, it is not limited to any particular number of characters in your font, nor to a particular number of characters to render.

If you are sure that you do not have more than 256 characters in your font, texture arrays may be worth a consideration to strip off bus bandwidth in a similar manner as generating quads from points in the geometry shader. When using an array texture, the texture coordinates of all quads have identical, constant s and t coordinates and only differ in the r coordinate, which is equal to the character index to render.
But like with the other techniques, the expected gains are marginal at the cost of being incompatible with previous generation hardware.

There is a handy tool by Jonathan Dummer for generating distance textures: description page

Update:
As more recently pointed out in Programmable Vertex Pulling (D. Rákos, "OpenGL Insights", pp. 239), there is no significant extra latency or overhead associated with pulling vertex data programmatically from the shader on the newest generations of GPUs, as compared to doing the same using the standard fixed function.
Also, the latest generations of GPUs have more and more reasonably sized general-purpose L2 caches (e.g. 1536kiB on nvidia Kepler), so one may expect the incoherent access problem when pulling random offsets for the quad corners from a buffer texture being less of a problem.

This makes the idea of pulling constant data (such as quad sizes) from a buffer texture more attractive. A hypothetical implementation could thus reduce PCIe and memory transfers, as well as GPU memory, to a minimum with an approach like this:

  • Only upload a character index (one per character to be displayed) as the only input to a vertex shader that passes on this index and gl_VertexID, and amplify that to 4 points in the geometry shader, still having the character index and the vertex id (this will be "gl_primitiveID made available in the vertex shader") as the sole attributes, and capture this via transform feedback.
  • This will be fast, because there are only two output attributes (main bottleneck in GS), and it is close to "no-op" otherwise in both stages.
  • Bind a buffer texture which contains, for each character in the font, the textured quad's vertex positions relative to the base point (these are basically the "font metrics"). This data can be compressed to 4 numbers per quad by storing only the offset of the bottom left vertex, and encoding the width and height of the axis-aligned box (assuming half floats, this will be 8 bytes of constant buffer per character -- a typical 256 character font could fit completely into 2kiB of L1 cache).
  • Set an uniform for the baseline
  • Bind a buffer texture with horizontal offsets. These could probably even be calculated on the GPU, but it is much easier and more efficient to that kind of thing on the CPU, as it is a strictly sequential operation and not at all trivial (think of kerning). Also, it would need another feedback pass, which would be another sync point.
  • Render the previously generated data from the feedback buffer, the vertex shader pulls the horizontal offset of the base point and the offsets of the corner vertices from buffer objects (using the primitive id and the character index). The original vertex ID of the submitted vertices is now our "primitive ID" (remember the GS turned the vertices into quads).

Like this, one could ideally reduce the required vertex bandwith by 75% (amortized), though it would only be able to render a single line. If one wanted to be able to render several lines in one draw call, one would need to add the baseline to the buffer texture, rather than using an uniform (making the bandwidth gains smaller).

However, even assuming a 75% reduction -- since the vertex data to display "reasonable" amounts of text is only somewhere around 50-100kiB (which is practically zero to a GPU or a PCIe bus) -- I still doubt that the added complexity and losing backwards-compatibility is really worth the trouble. Reducing zero by 75% is still only zero. I have admittedly not tried the above approach, and more research would be needed to make a truly qualified statement. But still, unless someone can demonstrate a truly stunning performance difference (using "normal" amounts of text, not billions of characters!), my point of view remains that for the vertex data, a simple, plain old vertex buffer is justifiably good enough to be considered part of a "state of the art solution". It's simple and straightforward, it works, and it works well.

Having already referenced "OpenGL Insights" above, it is worth to also point out the chapter "2D Shape Rendering by Distance Fields" by Stefan Gustavson which explains distance field rendering in great detail.

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Intersting - good stuff. How do these techniques work for making small fonts look as good as "soft" font specific rendering of antialiased fonts for document viewing in the 10 to 30 pixel high range? –  peterk Feb 9 '12 at 23:51
    
They look quite good (even with naive filtering and in absence of mipmapping, since you have very small textures and the data nicely interpolates). Personally I think they even look better than the "real" thing in many cases, because there are no oddities as hinting, which often produce things that I perceive as "weird". For example, smaller text doesn't suddenly get bold for no obvious reason, nor pop to pixel boundaries - effects you often see with "real" fonts. There may be historic reasons for that (1985 b/w displays), but today, it's beyond my comprehension why it has to be like that. –  Damon Feb 10 '12 at 12:23
    
sounds good !!! –  peterk Feb 11 '12 at 16:34
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Works & looks great, thanks for sharing! For those who want HLSL frag shader source see here. You can adapt this for GLSL by replacing the clip(...) line with if (text.a < 0.5) {discard;} (or text.a < threshold). HTH. –  Nick Wiggill Oct 7 '12 at 14:05
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@NicolBolas: You're right about that sentence, sorry. It is indeed a bit misleading. In the previous paragraph, I wrote "One could probably even generate this on the GPU, but that would require feedback and... isnogud." -- but then errornously continued with "the generated data from the feedback buffer". I'll correct this. Actually, I'll rewrite the complete thing on the weekend, so it's less ambiguous. –  Damon Mar 29 '13 at 15:00
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The most widespread technique is still textured quads. However in 2005 LORIA developed something called vector textures, i.e. rendering vector graphics as textures on primitives. If one uses this to convert TrueType or OpenType fonts into a vector texture you get this:

http://alice.loria.fr/index.php/publications.html?Paper=VTM@2005

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Do you know of any implementations using this technique? –  luke Aug 14 '13 at 12:44
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I think your best bet would be to look into cairo graphics with OpenGL backend.

The only problem I had when developing a prototype with 3.3 core was deprecated function usage in OpenGL backend. It was 1-2 years ago so situation might have improved...

Anyway, I hope in the future desktop opengl graphics drivers will implement OpenVG.

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One good place to start would be the font rendering survey on OpenGL.org.

My guess is that there's really not a lot to gain from writing something like a compute shader to handle rasterizing fonts -- the CPU can already do the job faster than anybody cares about. Even under Windows 3.1 on a 486/33 (or something on that order) rendering a screen full of text was virtually instantaneous...

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Font rendering has changed a lot over the years. OpenGL does not have any native method of rendering text. Typically as mentioned in this thread, it is done by generating geometry, texture mapping it appropriately and rendering it on screen. If you are crazy you can generate 3d fonts or vector fonts, but they typically are much to performance heavy for the minimal improvements you can have. Back in the 486 days and dos, text rendering was a lot slower then you remember. Output to screen could be the bottleneck of a lot of console programs. –  HaMMeReD Feb 21 '12 at 6:41
    
Actually I rather recently used a 286 system and it actually did render text faster than many consoles do on modern hardware. At that time text rendering was heavily hardware accelerated, much unlike what it is now. Currently I am reading this thread precisely because software rendering with Cairo/Pango (Freetype) is unacceptably slow, causing noticeable delays in my application for high resolution text. –  Tronic Feb 5 '13 at 2:56
    
^^^Exactly. In terms of text-rendering and 2D performance, we've gone backwards over the past 15 years. 20 years ago, character-mode VGA was practically instantaneous... the only real limiting factor was the 60-85fps framerate imposed by the monitor... to scroll "faster", you had to omit stuff entirely. Ditto, for GDI-rasterized TrueType fonts. In a more sensible universe, 2D acceleration would be a seamless part of 3D chipsets that simply works on rectangular bitmaps, regardless of whether they're "full-screen", wrapped onto something, or otherwise rendered as textures of a "real" 3D surface. –  Bitbang3r Jun 26 '13 at 22:31
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http://code.google.com/p/glyphy/

The main difference between GLyphy and other SDF-based OpenGL renderers is that most other projects sample the SDF into a texture. This has all the usual problems that sampling has. Ie. it distorts the outline and is low quality. GLyphy instead represents the SDF using actual vectors submitted to the GPU. This results in very high quality rendering.

The downside is that the code is for iOS with OpenGL ES. I'm probably going to make a Windows/Linux OpenGL 4.x port (hopefully the author will add some real documentation, though).

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There are really some good places to start with: see: http://ftgl.sourceforge.net/docs/html/ftgl-tutorial.html for example or.. http://code.google.com/p/freetype-gl/ or see the nehe tutorial: freetype_fonts_in_opengl .. all these technics work very well for me.

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Thanks for offering your help, but the best (fastest and best-looking) of these techniques is what I mentioned in the question as well-known but outdated. –  Ben Voigt May 20 '12 at 13:56
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