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The other day I asked this question:

Should the repository layer return data-transfer-objects (DTO)?

The answer (well by just one person, but I already had a hunch that it wasn't a good idea) was that no, the repository later should not have to deal with the DTO objects (their purpose is purely to be sent over the wire) and the service layer should deal with that.

Now I've come up with a construction in the meantime that I need your opinion on. The idea is that, when it makes sense to do so, the repository layer can return an interface type I've defined called IProjectable. This wraps the query (the repository layer does not execute the query yet) but does not allow the consumer to change the query (it's not IQueryable), just to perform projection operations on it (so far for me only First and ToPagedList) that would perform the projection and actually execute the query.

So something like this in the repository:

public IProjectable<User> GetUser(int id)
{
  var query = from u in Set<User>()
              where u.UserID == id
              select u;

  return query.AsProjectable();
}

And in the service layer something like this:

var dto = repository.GetUser(16).Single(u => new SimpleUserDto
{
  FullName = u.FirstName + " " + u.LastName,
  DisplayAddress = u.Address.Street + u.Address.HouseNumber,
  OrderCount = u.Orders.Count()
});

return dto;

Am I correct in saying that doing the actual data access here is still the responsibility of the repository layer (as it should be) and that the projection to a serializable form is the responsibility of the service layer (as it should be)?

The only other way I see to do this efficiently (returning a User from the repository and doing the Count() on his Orders in the service layer would result in an extra query to the database) is to define a type that has all these properties and return it from the repository layer and just don't call it "Dto", which seems silly as it would be identical to the DTO just not named the same for the sake of "purity". This way, it seems, I can have my cake and eat it for the most part too.

The downside I see is that you can get a mismatch where the service layer performs projections that can't actually be translated to SQL which it shouldn't have to worry about, or where it performs such complex projections that makes it questionable what layer is doing the actual data access.

I'm using Entity Framework 4 by the way, if it matters.

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2 Answers 2

Am I correct in saying that doing the actual data access here is still the responsibility of the repository layer (as it should be) and that the projection to a serializable form is the responsibility of the service layer (as it should be)?

Yes you are, the service layer still has no idea how the actual DataAccess is being performed (as it should not have not). Are the calls send to SQL? is there a caching layer in between?

The downside I see is that you can get a mismatch where the service layer performs projections that can't actually be translated to SQL which it shouldn't have to worry about, or where it performs such complex projections that makes it questionable what layer is doing the actual data access.

For this problem i use a pipeline pattern which basicly is just a set of extension methods over IProjectable which can perform tested projections. Next, in your serviceLayer you can just write your query using a composition of these pipeline methods, for example:

var users = repository.GetUsers().FilterByName("Polity").OrderByAge().ToTransferObjects();

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One of developers I most respect ayende (http://ayende.com/Blog/Default.aspx) said: "ORM is your repository" video here -> http://community.devexpress.com/blogs/seth/archive/2011/03/09/interview-with-ayende-rahien-aka-oren-eini.aspx

Question is do you really need Repository pattern? Just my opinion :)

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The repository pattern can actually still be very useful, even when using an ORM framework. I for instance definitely need the repository pattern despite using LinqToSql. That's because I have a "real" repository implementation that actually uses the database and a fake one which is only used for unit testing. While it would be possible to work with mocks instead, it's too tedious for large amounts of tests (right now I have about 900 tests, most of which have several different assertions). –  Adrian Grigore Mar 10 '11 at 19:04
    
@Adrian Grigore - good point, as with all pattern don't use them automatically. You know way you use Repository many people don't. That was may point. –  Darius Kucinskas Mar 10 '11 at 19:08

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