Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Here is a simple webserver I am working on

var server = require("http").createServer(function(req,resp) {
    resp.writeHead(200,{"Content-Type":"text/plain"})
    resp.write("hi")
    resp.end()
    server.close()
})
server.listen(80, 'localhost')
// The shortest webserver you ever did see! Thanks to Node.JS :)

Works great except for keep-alive. When the first request comes in, server.close gets called. But the process does not end. Actually the TCP connection is still open which allows another request to come through which is what I am trying to avoid.

How can I close existing keep-alive connections?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 16 down vote accepted

You can call request.connection.destroy() in the response callback. That will close the request connection.

It will also end your process since there is nothing left to do, the end result is the same as calling process.exit() right there.

share|improve this answer
1  
Calling destroy on each connection would require me to keep an array and periodically clear out the ones that were automatically destroyed. But that might work. –  George Bailey Mar 14 '11 at 13:47
    
Why would that be? The request object is passed along with the response in the callback (the req argument), i.e. just add req.connection.destroy() after resp.end() –  Ricardo Tomasi Mar 15 '11 at 19:02
5  
I do not want to eliminate keep-alive functionality for the sole purpose of easy webserver shutdown. At the time of resp.end(), it may not know that it will be shutting down in the next few seconds (before the connection automatically gets destroyed). Therefore it would not know that it should destroy the connection. That is why it would add to an array. But really, it is possible to have a connection that never makes its first request which means my first comment does not work as a solution and exit may be my best bet (short of cloning http.js source code). –  George Bailey Mar 15 '11 at 19:33

You can control the idle timeout for a connection, so you can set how long a keep-alive connection will remain open. For example:

server=require('http').createServer(function(req,res) {
    //Respond
    if(req.url.match(/^\/end.*/)) {
        server.close();
        res.writeHead(200,{'Content-Type':'text/plain'});
        res.end('Closedown');
    } else {
        res.writeHead(200,{'Content-Type':'text/plain'});
        res.end('Hello World!');
    }
}).listen(1088);
//Set the idle timeout on any new connection
server.addListener("connection",function(stream) {
    stream.setTimeout(4000);
});

We can test this with netcat:

ben@quad-14:~/node$ echo -e "GET /test HTTP/1.1\nConnection: keep-alive\n\n" | netcat -C -q -1 localhost 1088
HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: text/plain
Connection: keep-alive
Transfer-Encoding: chunked

c
Hello World!
0

after 4 seconds, the connection closes

And now we can show that closing the server works: after all idle connections are dropped, the server exits:

ben@quad-14:~/node$ echo -e "GET /end HTTP/1.1\nConnection: keep-alive\n\n" | netcat -C -q -1 localhost 1088
HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: text/plain
Connection: keep-alive
Transfer-Encoding: chunked

9
Closedown
0

after 4 seconds, the connection closes and the server exits

share|improve this answer
    
I guess you cold actually get the server to change the timeout during the course of the running time of the server. So if you are not expecting a shutdown, you can lengthen the keep-alive time... –  George Bailey Dec 16 '11 at 14:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.