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I have the following words on my text file and I want extract as follow.

device1 te rfe3 -1     10.1.2.3   device1 te rfe3

device2 cdr thr        10.2.5.3   device2 cdr thr

device4                10.6.0.8   device4

device3 hrdnsrc dhe    10.8.3.6   device3 hrdnsrc dhe

my objective is to extract the device name and the ip adrress everything else to strip away. the is no pattern after device name some of them has 2-3 word some of them does not have any thing. also I don't need the 3rd column. I am looking the result like this.

device1   10.1.2.3

device2   10.2.5.3 

device3   10.8.3.6 

device3   10.8.9.4 

is this possible? Thanks in advance.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted
 sed -r 's/^([^ ]*) .* (([0-9]{1,3}\.){3}[0-9]{1,3}).*$/\1 \2/'

Proof of Concept

$ sed -r 's/^([^ ]*) .* (([0-9]{1,3}\.){3}[0-9]{1,3}).*$/\1 \2/' ./infile
device1 10.1.2.3

device2 10.2.5.3

device4 10.6.0.8

device3 10.8.3.6
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perfect! you are the man!! thank you so much. –  dan Mar 10 '11 at 19:52

In awk, this is something like

$ awk '{
         for (f = 2; f <= NF; f++) {
           if ($f ~ /^([0-9]+\.){3}[0-9]+$/) {
             print $1, $f
             break
           }
         }
       }' file

Here's a transcript:

mress:10192 Z$ cat pffft.awk
{
  for (f = 2; f <= NF; f++) {
    if ($f ~ /^([0-9]+\.){3}[0-9]+$/) {
      print $1, $f
      break
    }
  }
}
mress:10193 Z$ cat pfft.in 
device1 te rfe3 -1     10.1.2.3   device1 te rfe3
device2 cdr thr        10.2.5.3   device2 cdr thr
device4                10.6.0.8   device4
device3 hrdnsrc dhe    10.8.3.6   device3 hrdnsrc dhe
mress:10194 Z$ awk -f pffft.awk pfft.in
device1 10.1.2.3
device2 10.2.5.3
device4 10.6.0.8
device3 10.8.3.6
mress:10195 Z$ _
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your response but nothing change on the file. –  dan Mar 10 '11 at 18:40
    
I am having trouble interpreting that response. –  geekosaur Mar 10 '11 at 18:45
    
@dan: awk will not change the file. It reads text from the file and writes it to standard output. To update the file, redirect output with something like awk '...' file > file2. Do not use the same file for input and output, because the OS will truncate the file as soon as it opens it for writing. –  Daniel Gallagher Mar 10 '11 at 18:46
    
I did copy and paste each your commands except (>) and at the end I did myFile > myFile2 and the result on the out put file is 0. did I miss anything? I have never use multi line awk command before may be I missed something. thank you Sir!!! –  dan Mar 10 '11 at 19:01
    
You may have missed something. I'll edit with something more useful; for some reason I completely spaced on my example not being cut-and-paste-able. –  geekosaur Mar 10 '11 at 19:12

in perl

perl -ne 'next if /^\s*$/ ; /^(\w+).*?(\d+(\.\d+){3})/; print "$1\t$2\n"' test_file

for sorted results you could probably pipe the output to sort command

perl -ne 'next if /^\s*$/ ; /^(\w+).*?(\d+(\.\d+){3})/; print "$1\t$2\n"' test_file | sort

Updated script like version

my $test_file = shift or die "no input file provided\n";

# open a filehandle to your test file
open my $fh, '<', $test_file or die "could not open $test_file: $!\n";

while (<$fh>) {
    # ignore the blank lines
    next if /^\s*$/;

    # regex matching
    /               # regex starts
    ^               # beginning of the string
    (\w+)           # store the first word in $1
    \s+             # followed by a space
    .*?             # match anything but don't be greedy until...
    (\d+(\.\d+){3}) # expands to (\d+\.\d+\.\d+\.\d+) and stored in $2
    /x;             # regex ends 

    # print first and second match
    print "$1\t$2\n"
}
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Awesome! this is working perfectly on command line,so I want include on my perl script. how is that work inside the script. any idea!!! thank you so very much –  dan Mar 10 '11 at 19:19
    
updated my post, hope it helps. –  Ashish Kumar Mar 10 '11 at 21:29

Depending on how close to an IP number the cruft get, this may or may not cat your cake:

sed -re 's/^([^ ]*).* ([0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}).*/\1 \2/g'
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nothing happen on the command. thanks for your response though. –  dan Mar 10 '11 at 18:46

Python's not on your list, but something like this might work.

import sys
import re
pattern= re.compile( "^(\w+)\s.*?\s(\d+\.\d+\.\d+\.\d+)\s.*$" )
for line in sys.stdin:
    match= pattern.match( line )
    sys.stdout.write( "{0} {1}".format( match.group(1), match.group(2) ) )

It should work on most Linux platforms, since Python is already installed.

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no clue how it's work. add your command on linux command line? or create as script and run. would you tell me how? thanks again! –  dan Mar 10 '11 at 18:43
    
The pattern should be "^(\w+)\s.*?\s(\d+\.\d+\.\d+\.\d+)\s" and the groups to print "match.group(1), match.group(2)". –  Ekkehard.Horner Mar 10 '11 at 18:50
    
@Ekkehard.Horner: Thanks! –  S.Lott Mar 10 '11 at 18:51

Assuming the input file has the fields always aligned to the same columns, the shortest POSIX solution would be

$ cut -c1-8,23-33 x
device1  10.1.2.3

device2  10.2.5.3

device4  10.6.0.8

device3  10.8.3.6
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