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super simple question, but I just wanted some clarification. I want to be able to restart a thread using AutoResetEvent, so I call the following sequence of methods to my AutoResetEvent.

setupEvent.Reset();                   
setupEvent.Set();

I know it's really obvious, but MSDN doesn't state in their documentation that the Reset method restarts the thread, just that it sets the state of the event to non-signaled.

UPDATE:

Yes the other thread is waiting at WaitOne(), I'm assuming when it gets called it will resume at the exact point it left off, which is what I don't want, I want it to restart from the beginning. The following example from this valuable resource illustrates this:

static void Main()
  {
    new Thread (Work).Start();

    _ready.WaitOne();                  // First wait until worker is ready
    lock (_locker) _message = "ooo";
    _go.Set();                         // Tell worker to go

    _ready.WaitOne();
    lock (_locker) _message = "ahhh";  // Give the worker another message
    _go.Set();
    _ready.WaitOne();
    lock (_locker) _message = null;    // Signal the worker to exit
    _go.Set();
  }

  static void Work()
  {
    while (true)
    {
      _ready.Set();                          // Indicate that we're ready
      _go.WaitOne();                         // Wait to be kicked off...
      lock (_locker)
      {
        if (_message == null) return;        // Gracefully exit
        Console.WriteLine (_message);
      }
    }
  }

If I understand this example correctly, notice how the Main thread will resume where it left off when the Work thread signals it, but in my case, I would want the Main thread to restart from the beginning.

UPDATE 2:

@Jaroslav Jandek - It's quite involved, but basically I have a CopyDetection thread that runs a FileSystemWatcher to monitor a folder for any new files that are moved or copied into it. My second thread is responsible for replicating the structure of that particular folder into another folder. So my CopyDetection thread has to block that thread from working while a copy/move operation is in progress. When the operation completes, the CopyDetection thread restarts the second thread so it can re-duplicate the folder structure with the newly added files.

UPDATE 3:

@SwDevMan81 - I actually didn't think about that and that would work save for one caveat. In my program, the source folder that is being duplicated is emptied once the duplication process is complete. That's why I have to block and restart the second thread when new items are added to the source folder, so it can have a chance to re-parse the folder's new structure properly.

To address this, I'm thinking of maybe adding a flag that signals that it is safe to delete the source folder's contents. Guess I could put the delete operation on it's own Cleanup thread.

@Jaroslav Jandek - My apologies, I thought it would be a simple matter to restart a thread on a whim. To answer your questions, I'm not deleting the source folder, only it's content, it's a requirement by my employer that unfortunately I cannot change. Files in the source folder are getting moved, but not all of them, only files that are properly validated by another process, the rest must be purged, i.e. the source folder is emptied. Also, the reason for replicating the source folder structure is that some of the files are contained within a very strict sub-folder hierarchy that must be preserved in the destination directory. Again sorry for making it complicated. All of these mechanisms are in place, have been tested and are working, which is why I didn't feel the need to elaborate on them. I only need to detect when new files are added so I may properly halt the other processes while the copy/move operation is in progress, then I can safely replicate the source folder structure and resume processing.

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What is the context of calling those methods? Is the other thread sitting at a WaitOne? –  BrandonAGr Mar 10 '11 at 18:32
    
Yes, the other thread is sitting at a WaitOne. –  kingrichard2005 Mar 10 '11 at 18:36
    
You assume right, the thread will continue it's work when it gets signalled. Restart from the beginning? That would cause a deadlock! What are you trying to do, exactly? –  Jaroslav Jandek Mar 10 '11 at 18:51
    
Hi Jaroslav Jandek, please see update 2 for an explanation. Thanks. –  kingrichard2005 Mar 10 '11 at 19:07
    
Well, all those updates should have been in the original question. Each of your updates fundamentally changes the algorithm... Btw. why delete the source folder? The program that writes to it would have to recreate it every single time and it would be way more error prone (bcs. of multi-threading). Also, why do you empty source instead of moving files? Or does the destination folder change with each change? –  Jaroslav Jandek Mar 10 '11 at 20:40
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

So thread 1 monitors and thread 2 replicates while other processes modify the monitored files.

Concurrent file access aside, you can't continue replicating after a change. So a successful replication only occurs when there is long enough delay between modifications. Replication cannot be stopped immediately since you replicate in chunks.

So the result of monitoring should be a command (file copy, file delete, file move, etc.). The result of a successful replication should be an execution of a command.

Considering multiple operations can occur, you need a queue (or queued dictionary - to only perform 1 command on a file) of commands.

// T1:
somethingChanged(string path, CT commandType)
{
  commandQueue.AddCommand(path, commandType);
}

// T2:
while (whatever)
{
  var command = commandQueue.Peek();
  if (command.Execute()) commandQueue.Remove();
  else // operation failed, do what you like.
}

Now you may ask how to create a thread-safe query, but that probably belongs to another question (there are many implementations on the web).

EDIT (queue-less version with whole dir replication - can be used with query): If you do not need multiple operations (eg. always replication the whole directory) and expect the replication to always finish or fail and cancel, you can do:

private volatile bool shouldStop = true;

// T1:
directoryChanged()
{
  // StopReplicating
  shouldStop = true;
  workerReady.WaitOne(); // Wait for the worker to stop replicating.

  // StartReplicating
  shouldStop = false;
  replicationStarter.Set();
}

// T2:
while (whatever)
{
  replicationStarter.WaitOne();

  ... // prepare, throw some shouldStops so worker does not have to work too much.

  if (!shouldStop)
  {
    foreach (var file in files)
    {
      if (shouldStop) break;

      // Copy the file or whatever.
    }
  }

  workerReady.Set();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help Jaroslav, the requirement to purge the source directory was removed, which made life much easier. Now all I have to do is worry about cleanup any empty directories in the destination directory. You're suggestion will be useful if I'm required to purge the source directory in some future iteration of the program, thanks again. –  kingrichard2005 Mar 16 '11 at 20:30
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I think this example clarifies (to me anyway) how reset events work:

var resetEvent = new ManualResetEvent(false);
var myclass = new MyAsyncClass();
myclass.MethodFinished += delegate
{
  resetEvent.Set();
};
myclass.StartAsyncMethod();
resetEvent.WaitOne(); //We want to wait until the event fires to go on

Assume that MyAsyncClass runs the method on a another thread and fires the event when complete.

This basically turns the asynchronous "StartAsyncMethod" into a synchronous one. Many times I find a real-life example more useful.

The main difference between AutoResetEvent and ManualResetEvent, is that using AutoResetEvent doesn't require you to call Reset(), but automatically sets the state to "false". The next call to WaitOne() blocks when the state is "false" or Reset() has been called.

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You just need to make it loop like the other Thread does. Is this what you are looking for?

   class Program
   {
      static AutoResetEvent _ready = new AutoResetEvent(false);
      static AutoResetEvent _go = new AutoResetEvent(false);
      static Object _locker = new Object();
      static string _message = "Start";

      static AutoResetEvent _exitClient = new AutoResetEvent(false);
      static AutoResetEvent _exitWork = new AutoResetEvent(false);

      static void Main()
      {
         new Thread(Work).Start();
         new Thread(Client).Start();

         Thread.Sleep(3000); // Run for 3 seconds then finish up

         _exitClient.Set();
         _exitWork.Set();
         _ready.Set(); // Make sure were not blocking still
         _go.Set();
      }

      static void Client()
      {
         List<string> messages = new List<string>() { "ooo", "ahhh", null };
         int i = 0;
         while (!_exitClient.WaitOne(0))       // Gracefully exit if triggered
         {
            _ready.WaitOne();                  // First wait until worker is ready
            lock (_locker) _message = messages[i++];
            _go.Set();                         // Tell worker to go
            if (i == 3) { i = 0; }
         }
      }

      static void Work()
      {
         while (!_exitWork.WaitOne(0))             // Gracefully exit if triggered
         {
            _ready.Set();                          // Indicate that we're ready
            _go.WaitOne();                         // Wait to be kicked off...
            lock (_locker)
            {
               if (_message != null)
               {
                  Console.WriteLine(_message);
               }
            }
         }
      }
   }
share|improve this answer
    
Hi SwDevMan81, please see my update. –  kingrichard2005 Mar 10 '11 at 19:47
1  
no need to use locks here (_message writes are protected by _ready). Anyway, what this does is simple T1>T2>T1>T2>... in a blocking manner - you can do the same work on 1 thread. for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) Console.WriteLine(messages[i]) does exactly the same. –  Jaroslav Jandek Mar 10 '11 at 20:51
    
@Jaroslav - Yeah, its just a simple example, there isnt any real work done here –  SwDevMan81 Mar 11 '11 at 17:15
    
That is not my point. It does not matter what you are doing. The only difference is the work (any work it might be doing) will run on 2 threads instead of just one. Or in other words: one thread works, the other waits, then the other way around and repeat. Or simply: it does 1 task synchronously over 2 threads, which is the opposite of what multiple threads are used for. I hope you've got the point. –  Jaroslav Jandek Mar 11 '11 at 17:21
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