Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm having difficulty initializing a struct in code per below. Can this even be done, or do I really need to memcpy (urg) the 5-character string into the struct?

struct MyStruct  
{  
    char x[5];  
};

main(...)  
{  
    const char* MyString = {"mnopq"}; // I understand this is a non-NULL terminated string -  
                                  // it's OK, I just want five character fields in an array

struct MyStruct = {MyString};     // <---This gives warnings below  
}

warning: missing braces around initializer
warning: initialization makes integer from pointer without cast

If I wrap initializer like:

struct MyStruct = {{MyString}};

the first warning goes away. The second warning does not. And, thus, the struct is not initialized as hoped.

Thanks in advance for help.

share|improve this question
    
Oops...it's const char* MyString = "mnopq"; (no braces) –  user654077 Mar 10 '11 at 18:28
    
@user654077: Sorry, but your question and your comments contradict each other. If it should be const char* MyString = "mnopq", then it is a null-terminated string. Yet, in the code comments you say that it is not. ??? Decide what you want and edit your question. At this time it is a mess. –  AndreyT Mar 10 '11 at 18:37

4 Answers 4

"mnopq" is an array, const char * MyString is not.

struct MyStruct foo = {"abcde"}; will work, whereas your approach converts the pointer MyString to an integral value and assigns it to the first element of x.

share|improve this answer

You are trying to fill a char array with a pointer. MyString is seen as a const char * instead of an array. Change your type in the structure to const char *x, and it should do the trick. Also, MyString is actually a NULL terminated string here. The compiler sets it into memory with the extra NULL byte at the end, then treats MyString like a const char *.

If you do want the char x[5] instead of the const char *, you could initialize in a couple of ways,

struct MyStruct ms = {{'m', 'n', 'o', 'p', 'q'}};

or you could do

struct MyStruct ms = {{ MyString[0], MyString[1], MyString[2], MyString[3], MyString[4]}};

The first set of braces is for initializing the struct members, the second set is for initializing the char array members, so each member(char) has to be set individually.

share|improve this answer
    
I edited above to have an identifier. One other thing is that the MyString[index] version will print junk at the end whereas the first version does not (e.g. mnopq¦ah¦) –  Rob Mar 10 '11 at 19:51
    
Right, because there is no NULL terminator. But there shouldn't be a NULL at the end of the first example either... I don't think he mentioned using a defined print function to print out the array as a string. –  DavidMFrey Mar 10 '11 at 21:29

You need to declare a variable of the type MyStruct and assign it's x value to that string. This should work:

struct MyStruct {
char x[5];
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {

   struct MyStruct a;
   const char* MyString = "mnop";

   strncpy((a.x), MyString, 5);

   /* 
    *if within the 5 characters you do not have the null char it will 
    * also print garbage
    */
   printf("%s", a.x);

   return 0;
}

However you can't assign a pointer to const char to an array of char as they are different types. So you would need to either use char* in the struct or use memcpy / strcpy to get the information.

share|improve this answer

The answer by DavidMFrey is correct and should get credit before mine! However, here's the source code using his answer as I was able to run it:

#include <stdio.h>
struct MyStruct  
{  
    char x[5];  
};
int main(void)  
{  
    const char* MyString = "mnopq";
    struct MyStruct foo = {{ MyString[0], MyString[1], MyString[2], MyString[3], MyString[4]}};
    printf("foo.x is: %s\n", foo.x); // outputs: foo.x is: mnopq¦ah¦"

    struct MyStruct ms = {{'m', 'n', 'o', 'p', 'q'}};
    printf("ms.x is: %s\n", ms.x);   // ms.x is: mnopq

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.