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I have an application with a simple gui, very few graphics but a lot of objects ie. labels text boxes and a few panels.
On some panels it runs LDAP queries, in others it queries processes running and checks NIC status.
When I go to the LDAP searcher panel, memory usage drops down to app 30mb, when I return to the main panel that only runs a timer, It jumps to about 300mb + then keeps accumulating, I run GC.Collect() as often as I can, on minimize after primary methods have been run and such still to no effect, ive used optimize code under build in project properties and ive stripped out all of the Using system.whatever. I am a reasonably new programmer, its only been about 6 months since I started doing windows forms. Any help would be nice. My application is essentially a GUI that sits there with a timer running in the background, then does the aforementioned queries and some task skills. Nothing too memory intensive. Could the gui objects themselves be eating up my memory?

    public MainMethod()
    {
        try
        {

            InitializeComponent();

            notifyIcon1.Visible = true;


            // this.Opacity = .5;
            aTimer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(OnTimedEvent);
            aTimer.Interval = 1000 * 10;

            pword();
            this.ShowInTaskbar = false;
            this.Hide();
            this.Visible = false;
           // GC.Collect();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            eventWriter(ex);
        }

    }
    public void pword()
    {
        try
        {

            bool nCheck;
            string[] infoArray = new string[4];
            nCheck = checker.checkNetwork();
            int dayNum = 0;

            if (nCheck == true)
            {

                infoArray = checker.checkAD();   //this is similar code to CheckNetwork except it returns values from the user's AD account properties.
                label3.Text = infoArray[0];
                label2.Text = infoArray[2];
                label1.Text = infoArray[3];
                label21.Text = infoArray[0];
                label22.Text = infoArray[1];
                label23.Text = infoArray[2];
                label24.Text = infoArray[3];
                days = infoArray[3];
                dayNum = int.Parse(days);
                if (dayNum <= 15)
                {
                    timedIntervalChanger(2);
                    aTimer.Start();
                    GC.Collect();
                }
            }
            else
            {
                timedIntervalChanger(1);
                aTimer.Start();
                GC.Collect();
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            eventWriter(ex);
        }

} public bool checkNetwork() { bool connected; try {

            String objectName = WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent().Name;


            if (objectName.Contains("administrator"))
            {
                connected = false;
                return connected;
            }

            else
            {





                // Sets domain
                string LdapDomain = "mydomain.com"
                //Sets properties for directory Entry and Searcher
                string connectionPrefix = "LDAP://" + LdapDomain;
                DirectoryEntry entry = new DirectoryEntry(connectionPrefix);
                DirectorySearcher mySearcher = new DirectorySearcher(entry);


                mySearcher.Filter = "(&(objectClass=user)(objectCategory=Person)(|(cn=" + objectName + ")(sAMAccountName=" + objectName + ")))";

                //instantiates result object from the search

                SearchResult LDAPresult = mySearcher.FindOne();

                entry = LDAPresult.GetDirectoryEntry();
                connected = true;

            }
            return connected;
        }
        catch
        {
            connected = false;
            return connected;
        }
    }
    public void OnTimedEvent(object source, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        try
        {

            notifyIcon1.Visible = true;
            notifyIcon1.ShowBalloonTip(1000 * 9, "Test", "test text", ToolTipIcon.Warning);


         pword();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            eventWriter(ex);
        }


    }

It's when I show the form that the memory usage jumps tremendously. Each method is independant and I left out some of the object instantiation code.

share|improve this question
    
What problems are you observing? –  David Heffernan Mar 10 '11 at 19:44
    
As @mjmarsh said, we could help you some more if you can show us some of your source code. (But, his suggestions are good.) –  JasCav Mar 10 '11 at 19:44
    
Just overall way too much memory being used, its not really affecting the machine but I would like a small application to not use 300mb of memory. –  eBot Mar 10 '11 at 19:51
    
You're aware that the usual advice is to avoid GC.Collect because it decreases performance, right? It forces objects into higher generations and causes each collection to take longer. Use it if you really know what you're doing, but don't just pepper it through your code. –  Joe White Mar 10 '11 at 19:53
    
what allocations deos the timer make? stuff that happens in a loop (or timer) is were you should look, and like everone here said, post some code please? also how are you measuring the memory consumption ?. can you give numbers from the Bytes in all heaps counter and the private bytes counter? (so we know what kind of memory to look for). –  Menahem Mar 10 '11 at 19:54
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2 Answers

We really need more info here. But a few suggestions:

  1. Use the using keyword or call Dispose() on all disposable objects when you are done with them
  2. Make sure you unregister event handlers when you are done listening for events

I am not sure what LDAP library you are using but in System.DirectoryServices many of the classes (like DirectoryEntry) implement IDisposable and can 'leak' if they are not disposed of

share|improve this answer
    
I am using System.DirectoryServices and Directory entry, directorysearcher, essentially im querying LDAP for a specific user account and returning various user object properties. The memory usage begins before I instantiate those objects. –  eBot Mar 10 '11 at 19:51
    
I will go through and call a dispose on any objects not being used, I had a feeling that GC.Collect didnt pick them up. –  eBot Mar 10 '11 at 19:52
    
What other info are you looking for I will supply with whatever is needed. –  eBot Mar 10 '11 at 20:35
    
I have used a try catch finally block, and disposed of the objects in the finally block and my memory usage has not spiked over 19mb. –  eBot Mar 11 '11 at 15:27
    
How does one un-register their event handlers in code? –  theJerm Nov 12 '13 at 5:46
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Use the .NET Memory Allocation option of the Performance Wizard found in the Analyze menu to create a Performance Session which will help you figure out what changes you need to make in your code to reduce memory usage.

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