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As part of learning to write Java I found on the web the "case" function for Multiple conditions.

The problem for me with this function is that it compares the argument to the specific numbers that I use as a conditions, but what happens if I want to compare the argument each time for a different range of numbers, Is there more Elegant way than use a lot of "if"s? Something more like the "cond" syntax in scheme?

public class Assignment02Q03 {
public static void main(String[] args){
int grade=Integer.parseInt(args[0]);
if (grade >= 90) {
    System.out.println("A");
}else {
if (grade>=80 ){
    System.out.println("B");
}else {
    if (grade>=70){
        System.out.println("C");
    }else {
        if (grade>=60){
            System.out.println("D");
        }else { 
            System.out.println("F");
        }
        }
    }   
}   
}

}

There must be something more elegant :)

Thank you!

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4  
could you show an example of a code snippet you don't like and what you would like it to look like? –  Ramy Mar 10 '11 at 19:53
    
Sure Ramy, I'll finish writing the code this way and I'll edit my question afterwards. –  Unknown user Mar 10 '11 at 20:00

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Generally written as:

if (grade >= 90) {
    System.out.println("A");
} else if (grade>=80 ) {
    System.out.println("B");
} else if (grade>=70) {
    System.out.println("C");
} else if (grade>=60) {
    System.out.println("D");
} else { 
    System.out.println("F");
}

Not that there is anything special about else if. The braces can be replaced by a single statement, in this an if-else statement. The indentation is like nothing else in the language, but it's an idiom that should be easy to follow.

For an expression, there is also the ternary operator:

System.out.println(
    grade>=90 ? "A" :
    grade>=80 ? "B" :
    grade>=70 ? "C" :
    grade>=60 ? "D" :
    "F"
);
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Thank you Tom ! –  Unknown user Mar 10 '11 at 20:28

In Java there are the ifs, switch case construct and ternary operator(which is a shortened if). Nothing elegant I guess:)

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There's nothing built into the language. For terse and quick code, you can create a Map that maps your test values to Runnable or Callable actions. However, that tends to be a little opaque because you have to look elsewhere in your code for info on what's in the map.

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1  
+1. I think it's right way to reflect many conditionals expressions to Java. But it should be LinkedHashMap, as order matter. –  Stas Kurilin Mar 10 '11 at 20:05
    
@Stas - Of course, you are right that test order sometimes matters. I hadn't thought about that. They often don't matter (when the tests are mutually exclusive, like in a switch with no fall-through), but when the order does matter, the tests would have to be rewritten to be mutually exclusive. –  Ted Hopp Mar 10 '11 at 20:16
    
Of course in real cases order mostly doesn't matters. BUT in Schemes cond it metters) –  Stas Kurilin Mar 10 '11 at 20:23

Like many other languages you may use a ternary if-test.

String text = (1 < 10) ? "One is not greater than ten!" : "One is greater than ten";
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There is OOP and polymorphism in Java) You can write smt like

 ActionFactory.create(grade).execute()

 //returns some instance
 public static AbstractAction create(int grade){
      //can be based on Maps as @Ted Hopp mentioned
      if(grade >= 0){
           return new PositiveAction();
      } else {
           return new NegativeAction();
      }
 }
 //can be interface
 class AbstractAction{
     public abstract void execute();
 }
 class PositiveAction extends AbstractAction {
     public void execute(){Sout("positive");}
 }
 class NegativeAction extends AbstractAction {
     public void execute(){Sout("negative");}
 }

It seems more verbose, but it works in real tasks. Java isn't for elegant solutions. Java for work. Feel Java)

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if (a > b) 
{
  max = a;
}
else 
{
  max = b;
}

can be written like this....

max = (a > b) ? a : b;
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1  
Don't you mean 'can be written'? –  Zach L Mar 10 '11 at 20:00
    
yep .... good catch –  Holograham Mar 10 '11 at 20:35

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