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I have a Chronometer widget in my Android app. I was wondering how to get the time from it. I tried getText, getFormat, getBase, etc, but none of them work. This is probably a easy question, but I could not find it on Google.
Thanks, Isaac Waller

Example code snippet:

Chronometer t = (Chronometer)findViewById(R.id.toptime);
long time = SystemClock.elapsedRealtime()-t.getBase();
Log.d(null,"Was: "+time); //time is not the proper time for some reason - it is a random number between 0 and 50
t.setBase(SystemClock.elapsedRealtime());
t.start();
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7 Answers 7

up vote 49 down vote accepted
+100

If you look at the source of the Chronometer class, you'll see that it doesn't store the elapsed time in a field and it calculates it internally every time it needs to update the display.

However it's relatively easy to do the same in your own code:

long elapsedMillis = SystemClock.elapsedRealtime() - chronometerInstance.getBase();

This assumes that you have started your clock something like this:

chronometerInstance.setBase(SystemClock.elapsedRealtime());
chronometerInstance.start();

Here's a full example:

public class ChronoExample extends Activity {
Chronometer mChronometer;

@Override
protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

    LinearLayout layout = new LinearLayout(this);
    layout.setOrientation(LinearLayout.VERTICAL);

    mChronometer = new Chronometer(this);
    layout.addView(mChronometer);

    Button startButton = new Button(this);
    startButton.setText("Start");
    startButton.setOnClickListener(mStartListener);
    layout.addView(startButton);

    Button stopButton = new Button(this);
    stopButton.setText("Stop");
    stopButton.setOnClickListener(mStopListener);
    layout.addView(stopButton);

    Button resetButton = new Button(this);
    resetButton.setText("Reset");
    resetButton.setOnClickListener(mResetListener);
    layout.addView(resetButton);        

    setContentView(layout);
}

private void showElapsedTime() {
    long elapsedMillis = SystemClock.elapsedRealtime() - mChronometer.getBase();            
    Toast.makeText(ChronoExample.this, "Elapsed milliseconds: " + elapsedMillis, 
            Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
}

View.OnClickListener mStartListener = new OnClickListener() {
    public void onClick(View v) {
        mChronometer.start();
        showElapsedTime();
    }
};

View.OnClickListener mStopListener = new OnClickListener() {
    public void onClick(View v) {
        mChronometer.stop();
        showElapsedTime();
    }
};

View.OnClickListener mResetListener = new OnClickListener() {
    public void onClick(View v) {
        mChronometer.setBase(SystemClock.elapsedRealtime());
        showElapsedTime();
    }
};
}

One somewhat confusing thing about Chronometer is that you can't really use it as a stopwatch that gets started, stopped and restarted again. When it's running, it will always show the time elapsed since you last reset it, no matter how many times and for how long you have stopped it in the meantime. When it is stopped, it simply stops updating the display.

If you need something like a stopwatch you'll have to subclass Chronometer or maybe create your own version using the source.

alt text

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Hello, thank you, but I cannot get it to work - I always get a (seemingly) random number between 1 and 50 about when I try. Thanks, Isaac –  Isaac Waller Feb 8 '09 at 23:11
    
It should be an easy thing to fix. Can you post a code snippet? –  nyenyec Feb 8 '09 at 23:46
    
I posted a code snippet - thanks. –  Isaac Waller Feb 11 '09 at 2:21
1  
+1 you saved my time. –  Samuel Apr 7 '11 at 9:23
    
@nyenyec Can you also answer how to get time and set in another Activity? Thx –  Umitk Jun 11 at 13:47

I found this example really useful, thanks nyenyec!

Here's my two cents on how to turn it into a real stopwatch function, without subclassing Chronometer. Just change the mStartListener method to parse the text from mChronometer (it's derived from TextView after all), calculate milliseconds, and use setBase() to readjust the base time to that amount of time in the past:

  View.OnClickListener mStartListener = new OnClickListener() {
    public void onClick(View v) {

      int stoppedMilliseconds = 0;

      String chronoText = mChronometer.getText().toString();
      String array[] = chronoText.split(":");
      if (array.length == 2) {
        stoppedMilliseconds = Integer.parseInt(array[0]) * 60 * 1000
            + Integer.parseInt(array[1]) * 1000;
      } else if (array.length == 3) {
        stoppedMilliseconds = Integer.parseInt(array[0]) * 60 * 60 * 1000 
            + Integer.parseInt(array[1]) * 60 * 1000
            + Integer.parseInt(array[2]) * 1000;
      }

      mChronometer.setBase(SystemClock.elapsedRealtime() - stoppedMilliseconds);
      mChronometer.start();
    }
  };
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Thanks for you answer. I've used to solve this: stackoverflow.com/questions/2324701/… –  Macarse Feb 26 '10 at 12:30
    
Any ideea how to fix this: stackoverflow.com/questions/3811005/… ? –  Alin Oct 4 '10 at 8:39

My Solution:

    public void starttimer(View view){
    Button mybtn = (Button) view;
    if (mybtn.equals(findViewById(R.id.button1))) {
        mycm.setBase(SystemClock.elapsedRealtime() - elapsed);
        mycm.start();
    }
    else {
        mycm.stop();
        elapsed = SystemClock.elapsedRealtime() -  mycm.getBase();
    }
}

In onCreate:

    mycm = (Chronometer) findViewById(R.id.chronometer1);
    elapsed = 0;

There are two buttons in the layout which both call the starttimer method (start and stop)

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Somewhat late response, but I was trying to solve this myself today. I ended up just parsing the text of the view:

    // Expects a string in the form MM:SS or HH:MM:SS
public static int getSecondsFromDurationString(String value){

    String [] parts = value.split(":");

    // Wrong format, no value for you.
    if(parts.length < 2 || parts.length > 3)
        return 0;

    int seconds = 0, minutes = 0, hours = 0;

    if(parts.length == 2){
        seconds = Integer.parseInt(parts[1]);
        minutes = Integer.parseInt(parts[0]);
    }
    else if(parts.length == 3){
        seconds = Integer.parseInt(parts[2]);
        minutes = Integer.parseInt(parts[1]);
        hours = Integer.parseInt(parts[1]);
    }

    return seconds + (minutes*60) + (hours*3600);
}

So calling getSecondsFromDurationString with view.getText().toString() gives you the total elapsed time in seconds (my application is some kind of stop watch, so you can pause it and resume it).

Hope it helps.

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@nyenyec +1: here is what i ended up with, while using nyenyec's response without a sub class.

        chronometer.setOnChronometerTickListener(new OnChronometerTickListener() {                      
        @Override
        public void onChronometerTick(Chronometer chronometer) {
            long elapsedMillis = SystemClock.elapsedRealtime() - chronometer.getBase();
            if(elapsedMillis>THRESHOLD){
                doYourStuff();
            }
        }
    });

where THRESHOLD is

private static final int THRESHOLD_EXERSISE = 60000; //In milliseconds
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    final Chronometer counter = (Chronometer) findViewById(R.id.chronometer1);
    counter.setOnChronometerTickListener(new OnChronometerTickListener() {

        public void onChronometerTick(Chronometer chronometer) {
            // TODO Auto-generated method stub
            chronometer.refreshDrawableState();

        }
    });

    final ToggleButton togglebutton = (ToggleButton) findViewById(R.id.togglebutton1);
    togglebutton.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {
        public void onClick(View v) {
            // Perform action on clicks
            if (togglebutton.isChecked()) {
                counter.start();
            } else {
                counter.stop();
            }
        }
    });
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Welcome to Stack Overflow! While this may theoretically answer the question, it would be preferable to include the explanation as well. –  Unni Kris Nov 7 '12 at 5:41
//ok here is the final changed code which works well

import android.app.Activity;
import android.os.Bundle;
import android.os.SystemClock;
import android.view.View;
import android.view.View.OnClickListener;
import android.widget.Button;
import android.widget.Chronometer;
import android.widget.LinearLayout;
import android.widget.Toast;

public class HelloWidgetActivity extends Activity {
    Chronometer mChronometer;

    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

        LinearLayout layout = new LinearLayout(this);
        layout.setOrientation(LinearLayout.VERTICAL);

        mChronometer = new Chronometer(this);
        layout.addView(mChronometer);

        Button startButton = new Button(this);
        startButton.setText("Start");
        startButton.setOnClickListener(mStartListener);
        layout.addView(startButton);

        Button stopButton = new Button(this);
        stopButton.setText("Stop");
        stopButton.setOnClickListener(mStopListener);
        layout.addView(stopButton);

        Button resetButton = new Button(this);
        resetButton.setText("Reset");
        resetButton.setOnClickListener(mResetListener);
        layout.addView(resetButton);

        setContentView(layout);
    }

    private void showElapsedTime() {
        long elapsedMillis = SystemClock.elapsedRealtime()
                - mChronometer.getBase();
        Toast.makeText(HelloWidgetActivity.this,
                "Elapsed milliseconds: " + elapsedMillis, Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
    }



    View.OnClickListener mStartListener = new OnClickListener() {
        public void onClick(View v) {
          int stoppedMilliseconds = 0;
          String chronoText = mChronometer.getText().toString();
          String array[] = chronoText.split(":");
          if (array.length == 2) {
            stoppedMilliseconds = Integer.parseInt(array[0]) * 60 * 1000
                + Integer.parseInt(array[1]) * 1000;
          } else if (array.length == 3) {
            stoppedMilliseconds = Integer.parseInt(array[0]) * 60 * 60 * 1000 
                + Integer.parseInt(array[1]) * 60 * 1000
                + Integer.parseInt(array[2]) * 1000;
          }
          mChronometer.setBase(SystemClock.elapsedRealtime() - stoppedMilliseconds);
          mChronometer.start();
        }
      };

    View.OnClickListener mStopListener = new OnClickListener() {
        public void onClick(View v) {
            mChronometer.stop();
            showElapsedTime();
        }
    };

    View.OnClickListener mResetListener = new OnClickListener() {
        public void onClick(View v) {
            mChronometer.setBase(SystemClock.elapsedRealtime());
            mChronometer.stop();
            showElapsedTime();
        }
    };
}
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