Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Assume I have a server application which is working in computer not connected to internet directly but with router, so the question is how to connect to that server from another computer not within internal network(from internet)?

As I know Administrator can configure router to redirect specified port requests to that computer, but can I do this automatically?

I am using WCF and C#

share|improve this question
    
why closing vote? I want to know how to create wcf service in not real IP computer, which can't be answered by administrator but programmer –  ArsenMkrt Mar 10 '11 at 20:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If the router supports uPnP, and the server application requests it, the router can open the port on behalf of the server app.

This really only works on consumer grade routers since any sane admin will have turned this off on a real network.

edit

There is some code for enabling uPnP in C# here and here.

The alternative is to have a server at a well known location on the internet. The application behind the firewall creates a persistent connection to the internet server. The user then connects to the internet server which relays packets to the firewalled application. Programs like teamviewer use this method to get around the NAT.

share|improve this answer
    
well but how skype do it? –  ArsenMkrt Mar 10 '11 at 20:30
    
@ArsenMkrt, this poster told you the answer. ;-) Skype uses UPnP for things like high quality video conferences. As others have pointed out, this won't work in all cases. You'd need to give the option of either using UPnP or having the router's administrator open a firewall hole manually. (tell them which ports you require, etc) –  Mike Mar 10 '11 at 22:06

Port Forwarding and NAT have to be done at the router, you can't hijack that setting from a given local machine, that would lead to exploits of biblical proportions.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree, but technically speaking it is of course POSSIBLE. Routers are certainly programmatically configurable and do not generally speaking require a person to press physical buttons on the device. So if one wanted to, one could host a service of some kind that would configure the router on behalf of an authenticated client. But I'm not saying doing so wouldn't be madness. :) –  The Dag Mar 10 '11 at 20:23
    
well but how skype do it? –  ArsenMkrt Mar 10 '11 at 20:29
    
@The Dag I want general method, hacking all kind of router's is a bit complex ;) –  ArsenMkrt Mar 10 '11 at 20:33

No. Your network should be configured to host the Server or Service on the Internet. Making use of Network Address Translation, Port Address Translation, or a DMZ would be the best approach.

share|improve this answer
    
well but how skype do it? –  ArsenMkrt Mar 10 '11 at 20:30

Administrator can configure router to redirect specified port requests to that computer

I think that's your answer right there. It may be possible to perform such configuration from the outside (internet) if something on the inside which allows you to connect to it (i.e. something already connected to the internet) also lets you perform such configuration. But considering the whole point of leaving some computers without internet connectivity that would be a strange setup indeed.

This, to my suspicious mind, sounds more like wanting to break in than wanting to do something one's allowed to. For the latter, the answers already given are pretty good. :)

share|improve this answer
    
well but how skype do it? –  ArsenMkrt Mar 10 '11 at 20:31
    
I believe Skype needs internet access. I don't know what port it uses though. :D –  The Dag Mar 10 '11 at 21:56
    
Apparently it uses port 80/443, which are usually open for HTTP and HTTPS, but with no listeners on a client (will be on web servers tho). I speculate, but based on this: support.skype.com/en/faq/FA528/… –  The Dag Mar 10 '11 at 22:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.