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It's probably beginner question but I'm going through documentation for longer time already and I can't find any solution. I thought I could use implode for each dimension and then put those strings back together with str_split to make new simple array. However I never know if the join pattern isn't also in values and so after doing str_split my original values could break.

Is there something like combine($array1, $array2) for arrays inside of multi-dimensional array?

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Please check this link for solution : stackoverflow.com/questions/14951811/… –  Prasanth Bendra Feb 20 '13 at 5:12

13 Answers 13

up vote 28 down vote accepted

Use array_values. (Example from php site)

<?php

$aNonFlat = array(
    1,
    2,
    array(
        3,
        4,
        5,
        array(
            6,
            7
        ),
        8,
        9,
    ),
    10,
    11
);

$objTmp = (object) array('aFlat' => array());

array_walk_recursive($aNonFlat, create_function('&$v, $k, &$t', '$t->aFlat[] = $v;'), $objTmp);

var_dump($objTmp->aFlat);

/*
array(11) {
  [0]=>
  int(1)
  [1]=>
  int(2)
  [2]=>
  int(3)
  [3]=>
  int(4)
  [4]=>
  int(5)
  [5]=>
  int(6)
  [6]=>
  int(7)
  [7]=>
  int(8)
  [8]=>
  int(9)
  [9]=>
  int(10)
  [10]=>
  int(11)
}
*/

?>
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2  
Thank you! I should probably check also user notes next time. –  Adriana Feb 8 '09 at 23:11
    
Does anyone know why this doesn't work unless I use the (depreciated) call-time pass by reference. i.e. array_walk_recursive($array, create_function('&$v, $k, &$t', '$t[] = $v;'), &$flattened); The function definition is correctly defined as pass by reference. but doesn't work unless I pass by reference during call-time. –  jskulski Apr 28 '10 at 20:21
2  
@jskilski Objects ($objTmp in this example) are passed by reference automatically; arrays are not. Try using an anonymous function (php.net/manual/en/functions.anonymous.php) instead of create_function. –  dave1010 Aug 31 '11 at 11:57
1  
this doesnt work in php 5.3.3 due to a bug in array_walk_recursive - bugs.php.net/bug.php?id=52719 –  crazyphoton Jul 23 '12 at 5:09
1  
@crazyphoton The kink says also This bug has been fixed in SVN. –  Luc M Jul 23 '12 at 5:53

Here is clean and efficient answer :

$array  = your array

$result = call_user_func_array('array_merge', $array);

echo "<pre>";
print_r($result);

REF: http://php.net/manual/en/function.call-user-func-array.php

Here is another solution (works with multi-dimensional array) :

function array_flatten($array) {

   $return = array();
   foreach ($array as $key => $value) {
       if (is_array($value)){ $return = array_merge($return, array_flatten($value));}
       else {$return[$key] = $value;}
   }
   return $return;

}

$array  = Your array

$result = array_flatten($array);

echo "<pre>";
print_r($result);
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3  
Elegant solution, this should be the top answer. –  Jonline Jul 25 '13 at 14:49
2  
+1, with caveats, see below. It should be noted that this ONLY works for a 2-level array. You would still need some kind of recursion if you want to flatten a higher order array. Essentially, it's calling array_merge() with the 1st level elements of your array, which may be what you want, but is not exactly what the OP was asking. –  Tom Auger Aug 19 '13 at 14:13
2  
This is the most elegant answer to the stated problem. Thumbs up –  user2831723 Feb 21 at 17:52
// $array = your multidimensional array

$flat_array = array();

foreach(new RecursiveIteratorIterator(new RecursiveArrayIterator($array)) as $k=>$v){

$flat_array[$k] = $v;

}

Also documented: http://www.phpro.org/examples/Flatten-Array.html

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2  
Note: Only use for arrays of primitives. "RecursiveArrayIterator treats all objects as having children, and tries to recurse into them." php.net/manual/en/class.recursivearrayiterator.php#106519 –  ReactiveRaven Jan 31 '12 at 9:49
2  
There is also iterator_to_array –  hakre Jun 21 '12 at 10:52
    
@hakre: +1 agreed: adding iterator_to_array() to this answer would negate the need for the foreach loop. It could be a simple one-liner function. (albeit a somewhat long one-line) –  SDC Jul 19 '12 at 12:14
    
I know this is old but still useful, however the $k needs to be replaced by something unique, such as a counter. Just using $k causes elements to be removed if the names are the same in inner arrays as the main one. –  Austin Best Oct 8 at 20:19
function flatten_array($array, $preserve_keys = 0, &$out = array()) {
    # Flatten a multidimensional array to one dimension, optionally preserving keys.
    #
    # $array - the array to flatten
    # $preserve_keys - 0 (default) to not preserve keys, 1 to preserve string keys only, 2 to preserve all keys
    # $out - internal use argument for recursion
    foreach($array as $key => $child)
        if(is_array($child))
            $out = flatten_array($child, $preserve_keys, $out);
        elseif($preserve_keys + is_string($key) > 1)
            $out[$key] = $child;
        else
            $out[] = $child;
    return $out;
}
share|improve this answer

A non-recursive solution (but order-destroying):

function flatten($ar) {
    $toflat = array($ar);
    $res = array();

    while (($r = array_shift($toflat)) !== NULL) {
    	foreach ($r as $v) {
    		if (is_array($v)) {
    			$toflat[] = $v;
    		} else {
    			$res[] = $v;
    		}
    	}
    }

    return $res;
}
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Another method from PHP's user comments (simplified) and here:

function array_flatten_recursive($array) { 
   if (!$array) return false;
   $flat = array();
   $RII = new RecursiveIteratorIterator(new RecursiveArrayIterator($array));
   foreach ($RII as $value) $flat[] = $value;
   return $flat;
}

The big benefit of this method is that it tracks the depth of the recursion, should you need that while flattening.
This will output:

$array = array( 
    'A' => array('B' => array( 1, 2, 3)), 
    'C' => array(4, 5) 
); 
print_r(array_flatten_recursive($array)); 

#Returns: 
Array ( 
    [0] => 1 
    [1] => 2 
    [2] => 3 
    [3] => 4 
    [4] => 5 
)
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3  
Note: Only use for arrays of primitives. "RecursiveArrayIterator treats all objects as having children, and tries to recurse into them." php.net/manual/en/class.recursivearrayiterator.php#106519 –  ReactiveRaven Jan 31 '12 at 9:51

This is one line, SUPER easy to use:

$result = array();
array_walk_recursive($original_array,function($v, $k) use (&$result){ $result[] = $v; });

Is very easy to understand, inside the anonymous function/closure $v is the value and $k is the key of your original array.

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In PHP>=5.3 and based on Luc M's answer (the first one) you can make use of closures like this

array_walk_recursive($aNonFlat, function(&$v, $k, &$t){$t->aFlat[] = $v;}, $objTmp);

I love this because I don't have to surround the function's code with quotes like when using create_function()

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1  
if you're using anonymous functions, you might as well use a captured closure variable directly rather than this objTemp stuff –  user102008 Jun 9 '12 at 8:02
    
There is a bug in PHP5.3.3 which causes this to crash - bugs.php.net/bug.php?id=52719 –  crazyphoton Jul 23 '12 at 5:08

If you're okay with loosing array keys, you may flatten a multi-dimensional array using a recursive closure as a callback that uses array_values(). Callback works with either array_walk() or array_walk_recursive().

$nu_array = null;
$callback = function ( $item ) use(&$callback, &$nu_array) {
    if (!is_array($item)) {
    $nu_array[] = $item;
    }
    else
    if ( is_array( $item ) ) {
     foreach( array_values($item) as $v) {
         if ( !(is_array($v))) {
             $nu_array[] = $v;
         }
         else
         { 
             $callback( $v );
         continue;
         }    
     }
    }
};

array_walk($array, $callback);
var_dump($nu_array);
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A new approach based on the previous example function submited by chaos, which fixes the bug of overwritting string keys in multiarrays:

# Flatten a multidimensional array to one dimension, optionally preserving keys.
# $array - the array to flatten
# $preserve_keys - 0 (default) to not preserve keys, 1 to preserve string keys only, 2 to preserve all keys
# $out - internal use argument for recursion

function flatten_array($array, $preserve_keys = 2, &$out = array(), &$last_subarray_found) 
{
        foreach($array as $key => $child)
        {
            if(is_array($child))
            {
                $last_subarray_found = $key;
                $out = flatten_array($child, $preserve_keys, $out, $last_subarray_found);
            }
            elseif($preserve_keys + is_string($key) > 1)
            {
                if ($last_subarray_found)
                {
                    $sfinal_key_value = $last_subarray_found . "_" . $key;
                }
                else
                {
                    $sfinal_key_value = $key;
                }
                $out[$sfinal_key_value] = $child;
            }
            else
            {
                $out[] = $child;
            }
        }

        return $out;
}

Example:
$newarraytest = array();
$last_subarray_found = "";
$this->flatten_array($array, 2, $newarraytest, $last_subarray_found);
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/*consider $mArray as multidimensional array and $sArray as single dimensional array
this code will ignore the parent array
*/

function flatten_array2($mArray) {
    $sArray = array();

    foreach ($mArray as $row) {
        if ( !(is_array($row)) ) {
            if($sArray[] = $row){
            }
        } else {
            $sArray = array_merge($sArray,flatten_array2($row));
        }
    }
    return $sArray;
}
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you can try this:

function flat_an_array($a)
{
    foreach($a as $i)
    {
        if(is_array($i)) 
        {
            if($na) $na = array_merge($na,flat_an_array($i));
            else $na = flat_an_array($i);
        }
        else $na[] = $i;
    }
    return $na;
}
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If you're interested in just the values for one particular key, you might find this approach useful:

function valuelist($array, $array_column) {
    $return = array();
    foreach($array AS $row){
        $return[]=$row[$array_column];
    };
    return $return;
};

Example:

Given $get_role_action=

array(3) {
  [0]=>
  array(2) {
    ["ACTION_CD"]=>
    string(12) "ADD_DOCUMENT"
    ["ACTION_REASON"]=>
    NULL
  }
  [1]=>
  array(2) {
    ["ACTION_CD"]=>
    string(13) "LINK_DOCUMENT"
    ["ACTION_REASON"]=>
    NULL
  }
  [2]=>
  array(2) {
    ["ACTION_CD"]=>
    string(15) "UNLINK_DOCUMENT"
    ["ACTION_REASON"]=>
    NULL
  }
}

than $variables['role_action_list']=valuelist($get_role_action, 'ACTION_CD'); would result in:

$variables["role_action_list"]=>
  array(3) {
    [0]=>
    string(12) "ADD_DOCUMENT"
    [1]=>
    string(13) "LINK_DOCUMENT"
    [2]=>
    string(15) "UNLINK_DOCUMENT"
  }

From there you can perform value look-ups like so:

if( in_array('ADD_DOCUMENT', $variables['role_action_list']) ){
    //do something
};
share|improve this answer
    
This is a PHP knock-off of a CFML function by the same name. –  Jeromy French Jul 23 at 20:45

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