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public class SampleClass {
     public int value;

     public SampleClass(int v)
     { value = v; }
}

// i want to access value like this
SampleClass sc = new SampleClass(5);

int i = sc;

Is there a way to do this in C#? I don't want to have to say sc.Value every time i need to access the value.

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sorry to say that but this would be pretty bad coding style and hard to understand for a different person! –  MUG4N Mar 10 '11 at 20:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Use an implicit conversion:

public class SampleClass {
     public int value;

     public SampleClass(int v)
     { value = v; }

     public static implicit operator int (SampleClass c)
     {
       return c.value;
     }
}

You should look into properties however.

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+1 for properties. –  Kon Mar 10 '11 at 20:46
    
I'm ashamed to admit I never heard of the implicit keyword. –  Jay Riggs Mar 10 '11 at 20:46
    
Jay: you only encounter it when providing casting operations on custom objects, so you don't stumble over it often. However, you probably use the behaviour of implicit operator on a daily basis. –  Femaref Mar 10 '11 at 20:48
    
I doubt it, actually. I can only think of a very few examples of user-defined implicit conversion operators. The implicit conversions which are part of the language itself (and not really defined on a type, e.g. int to long) aren't quite the same. –  Jon Skeet Mar 10 '11 at 20:49
    
I meant the concept of implicit conversion, be it user defined or with integral types. One example is string to XName in linq-to-xml. –  Femaref Mar 10 '11 at 20:54

You can do it by including an implicit conversion from SampleClass to int:

public static implicit operator int(SampleClass s)
{
    return s.value;
}

... but I would strongly recommend that you don't do so, or at least that you think very carefully beforehand. Implicit conversions make it harder to reason about the language in various ways (consider things like overload resolution, for example).

Very, very occasionally it's a good idea to introduce implicit conversions - for example LINQ to XML makes great use of it with string to XNamespace and string to XName conversions - but I wouldn't do it here just to avoid having to use .Value.

It's slightly more reasonable to make an explicit conversion (just change implicit to explicit in the operator conversion) in that at least that makes it clear-ish what's going on in the calling code... but at that point there's really not much difference in source size between a cast to int and using .Value.

(And as suggested elsewhere, don't make fields public - use properties instead.)

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Take a look at this. You need to overload the implicit cast operator for int.

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Yes, it's possible. You need to implement implicit for your SampleClass: Here it is:

public class SampleClass
{
  public int Value;
  public SampleClass(int v)
  {
    Value = v;
  }

  public static implicit operator int(SampleClass d)
  {
    return d.Value;
  }
}
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