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I'm familiar with the split command in linux. If I have a file that's 100 lines long,

split -l 5 myfile.txt

...will split myfile.txt into 20 files, each having 5 lines, and will write them to file.

My question is, I want to do this by column. Given a file with 100 columns, tab delimited, is there a similar command to split this file into 20 smaller files, each having 5 columns and all the rows?

I'm aware of how to use cut, but I'm hoping there's a simple UNIX command I've never heard of that will accomplish this without wrapping cut with perl or something.

Thanks in advance.

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by the way, i'm doing this on a 100GB file, 4 million columns, 11000 rows. –  Stephen Turner Mar 10 '11 at 23:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted
#!/bin/bash

(($# == 2)) || { echo -e "\nUsage: $0 <file to split> <# columns in each split>\n\n"; exit; }

infile="$1"

inc=$2
ncol=$(awk 'NR==1{print NF}' "$infile")

((inc < ncol)) || { echo -e "\nSplit size >= number of columns\n\n"; exit; }

for((i=0, start=1, end=$inc; i < ncol/inc + 1; i++, start+=inc, end+=inc)); do
  cut -f$start-$end "$infile" > "${infile}.$i"
done
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+0.91 (Deducted 0.02 for the dollar sign in the for arguments, 0.02 for the curly braces around infile and 0.04 for using AWK instead of something like read -r -a arr < "$infile"; ncol=${#arr[@]}, also 0.02 for echo instead of printf.) ;) –  Dennis Williamson Mar 11 '11 at 3:59
    
Hi SiegeX, Your solution is very nice. Cheers! –  Andy K Apr 18 at 12:47
# do something smarter with output files (& clear on start)
XIFS="${IFS}"
IFS=$'\t'
while read -a LINE; do 
  for (( i=0; i< ${#LINE[@]}; i++ )); do
    echo "${LINE[$i]}" >> /tmp/outfile${i}
  done
done < infile
IFS="${XIFS}"

Try the above ... using file name 'infile'

Note the saving and restoring of the IFS (does anyone have a better idea? a subshell?)

Also note that this appends, if you are running for a second time - you would want to delete prior run's outputs ...

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I don't think this script does what you think it does. Also, for your IFS question, just use while IFS=$'\t' read -a LINE; do –  SiegeX Mar 10 '11 at 21:44
    
Good idea about the IFS before the read! As for the rest - it does what I think - I tested it before I posted it ... I had 3 columns separated with tabs with 3 lines in the whole file. It created 3 output files with the individual columns - try it! Also I like it better than using cut because it scales better for large data –  nhed Mar 10 '11 at 23:17
    
nhed: Ok let me rephrase that, I don't think this script does what the OP wants =). He wants multiple columns (5) per file –  SiegeX Mar 10 '11 at 23:44
    
@Siege: OK, I stand corrected, I just re-read about the 5 columns (I guess I may have stopped reading at 'tab delimited' :) –  nhed Mar 11 '11 at 1:51

Thanks for the help. I hoped there would be a unix command similar to split, but I ended up wrapping the cut command with perl, via SiegeX's suggestion.

#!/usr/bin/perl

chomp(my $pwd = `pwd`);
my $help = "\nUsage: $0 <file to split> <# columns in each split>\n\n";
die $help if @ARGV!=2;


$infile = $ARGV[0];
chomp($ncol = `head -n 1 $infile | wc -w`);

$start=1;
$inc = $ARGV[1];
$end = $start+$inc-1;

die "\nSplit size >= number of columns\n\n" if $inc>=$ncol;

for($i=1 ; $i<$ncol/$inc +1 ; $i++) {
    if ($end>$ncol) {$end=$ncol;}
    `cut -f $start-$end $infile > $infile.$i`;
    $start += $inc;
    $end += $inc;
}
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perl schmerl, see my updated answer –  SiegeX Mar 10 '11 at 22:40

Here you have my solution:

First an input generator:

    1 #!/usr/bin/env ruby                                                                                                                                                                                       
    2 #                                                                                                                                                                                                         
    3 def usage(e)                                                                                                                                                                                              
    4   puts "Usage #{__FILE__} <n_rows> <n_cols>"                                                                                                                                                              
    5   exit e                                                                                                                                                                                                  
    6 end                                                                                                                                                                                                       
    7                                                                                                                                                                                                           
    8 usage 1 unless ARGV.size == 2                                                                                                                                                                             
    9                                                                                                                                                                                                           
   10 rows, cols = ARGV.map{|e| e.to_i}                                                                                                                                                                         
   11 (1..rows).each do |l|                                                                                                                                                                                     
   12   (1..cols).each {|c| printf "%s ", c }                                                                                                                                                                   
   13   puts ""                                                                                                                                                                                                 
   14 end 

The split tool:

    1 #!/usr/bin/env ruby                                                                                                                                                                                       
    2 #                                                                                                                                                                                                         
    3                                                                                                                                                                                                           
    4 def usage(e)                                                                                                                                                                                              
    5   puts "Usage #{__FILE__} <column_start> <column_end>"                                                                                                                                                    
    6   exit e                                                                                                                                                                                                  
    7 end                                                                                                                                                                                                       
    8                                                                                                                                                                                                           
    9 usage 1 unless ARGV.size == 2                                                                                                                                                                             
   10                                                                                                                                                                                                           
   11 c_start, c_end = ARGV.map{|e| e.to_i}                                                                                                                                                                     
   12 i = 0                                                                                                                                                                                                     
   13 buffer = []                                                                                                                                                                                               
   14 $stdin.each_line do |l|                                                                                                                                                                                   
   15   i += 1                                                                                                                                                                                                  
   16   buffer << l.split[c_start..c_end].join(" ")                                                                                                                                                             
   17   $stderr.printf "\r%d", i if i % 100000 == 0                                                                                                                                                             
   18 end                                                                                                                                                                                                       
   19 $stderr.puts ""                                                                                                                                                                                           
   20 buffer.each {|l| puts l}

Notice that the split tool dumps to the stderr the value of number of line it is processing so you can get an idea how fast is going.

Also, I am assuming that the separator is an space.

Example of how to run it:

 $ time ./gen.data.rb 1000 10 | ./split.rb 0 4 > ./out

Generate 1000 lines with 10 columns each and split the first 5 columns. I use time(1) to measure the running time.

We can use a little oneliner to do the splitting you requested (sequentially). It is very easy to process it in parallel in a single node (check bash building command wait) or to send them to a cluster.

$ ruby -e '(0..103).each {|i| puts "cat input.txt | ./split.rb #{i-4} #{i} > out.#{i/4}" if i % 4 == 0 && i > 0}' | /bin/bash

Which basically generates:

cat input.txt | ./split.rb 0 4 > out.1
cat input.txt | ./split.rb 4 8 > out.2
cat input.txt | ./split.rb 8 12 > out.3
cat input.txt | ./split.rb 12 16 > out.4
cat input.txt | ./split.rb 16 20 > out.5
cat input.txt | ./split.rb 20 24 > out.6
cat input.txt | ./split.rb 24 28 > out.7
cat input.txt | ./split.rb 28 32 > out.8
cat input.txt | ./split.rb 32 36 > out.9
cat input.txt | ./split.rb 36 40 > out.10
cat input.txt | ./split.rb 40 44 > out.11
cat input.txt | ./split.rb 44 48 > out.12
cat input.txt | ./split.rb 48 52 > out.13
cat input.txt | ./split.rb 52 56 > out.14
cat input.txt | ./split.rb 56 60 > out.15
cat input.txt | ./split.rb 60 64 > out.16
cat input.txt | ./split.rb 64 68 > out.17
cat input.txt | ./split.rb 68 72 > out.18
cat input.txt | ./split.rb 72 76 > out.19
cat input.txt | ./split.rb 76 80 > out.20
cat input.txt | ./split.rb 80 84 > out.21
cat input.txt | ./split.rb 84 88 > out.22
cat input.txt | ./split.rb 88 92 > out.23
cat input.txt | ./split.rb 92 96 > out.24
cat input.txt | ./split.rb 96 100 > out.25

And gets piped to bash.

Be careful with the number of processes (or jobs) you compute in parallel because it will flood your storage (unless you have independent storage volumes).

Hope that helps. Let us know how fast it runs for you.

-drd

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if you only need a QAD (Quick & Dirty) solution for in my case a fixed 8 column ; separated csv

#!/bin/bash
# delimiter is ;
cut -d';' -f1 "$1" > "${1}.1"
cut -d';' -f2 "$1" > "${1}.2"
cut -d';' -f3 "$1" > "${1}.3"
cut -d';' -f4 "$1" > "${1}.4"
cut -d';' -f5 "$1" > "${1}.5"
cut -d';' -f6 "$1" > "${1}.6"
cut -d';' -f7 "$1" > "${1}.7"
cut -d';' -f8 "$1" > "${1}.8"
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